10mm

JasonG

Active Member
#16
My glock 23 is great. Handles round after round with no issue. .40 is fine by me, 13+1 will suit me well whenever needed.
I like the idea of the 40 , but I'm looking for a little more gun. The only thing that has me on the fence is ammo availability for 10mm
 
#17
I've found that 10mm ammo isn't that hard to come by. Practice rounds are easy enough to find at places like Walmart and Cabela's. Not that I've fired a whole lot of the good stuff, but hard hitting loads are easy to get online. I would have absolutely zero hesitation about buying my G20 again. It's a great woods gun.
 

4sallypat

Active Member
#18
My first gun when I turned 21 was a 10mm - fell in love with the only 10mm around: S&W 1076 FBI.

Now I have the G20 ! It's the best gun for handling the powerful 10mm rounds. Being the first generation G20 without the rails, fatter grip, first generation magazine (U shape steel liner), and lack of finger grooves; so I had mine modified with a stippled grip, reduced grip size, titanium innards, night sights, 20 round mag extension (Arredondo) and Arotek slide release.

I also have the subcompact G29 it's little brother but it recoils more and blast is greater. Nice feature is that the 15 or 20rd mags fit and functions in the little grip....

I took the G20 to Alaska when I went sockeye fishing and will be taking the G29 to Washington for fishing this month.
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#19
John Wayne Carried a Colt 1911 .45 , that gun has a well proven record for settling disputes with all critters, being a gentleman ... I prefer a officers model for convience of carry.
 

steelydan

Newb seeking wisdom
#20
If you really think you need a 10mm, get a real one....http://smith-wessonforum.com/s-w-revolvers-1980-present/112118-mdl-657-classic-hunter-ii.html
No sense pansying around.
And as our resident expert will quickly confirm, if 6 won't solve your problem, 15 won't.
For backcountry carry, a wheelgun is hard to beat and a 5-6.5" barrel puts you in another time zone for ballistics.
For open carry, you will see me with a SW 386 XL Hunter, 7rds, 30 ounces, 6" barrel.
 
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JasonG

Active Member
#21
If you really think you need a 10mm, get a real one....http://smith-wessonforum.com/s-w-revolvers-1980-present/112118-mdl-657-classic-hunter-ii.html
No sense pansying around.
And as our resident expert will quickly confirm, if 6 won't solve your problem, 15 won't.
For backcountry carry, a wheelgun is hard to beat and a 5-6.5" barrel puts you in another time zone for ballistics.
For open carry, you will see me with a SW 386 XL Hunter, 7rds, 30 ounces, 6" barrel.
I'm also looking at a smith and wesson 329 pd.
 
#22
I also have a 329. Great carrying gun, less so for shooting! With normal factory ammo it's ok for me, with any of the hyperloads like the Buff Bore stuff, the recoil is unreal. Even with the reduced recoil stuff of Buff Bore, recoil is pretty 'sporty'. A fun gun to shoot, however, with 200 grain loads or .44 special rounds. I have had two issues with mine that make me nervous to use for a woods gun: 1) severe recoil causing bullets in the cylinder to jump their crimps and jam the cylinder. With factory Hornady 240 gr xtp ammo - it's happened 3 times with me and the cylinder was jammed until I could work the bullets back into the cases slightly with small tools...2) recoil causing the stupid little hammer lock thingy to engage, thereby making another shot impossible until I found the little S&W tool...I had a gunsmith take the lock out. So, I still have the issue of more than one bullet trying to go down-range, perhaps can be solved with reloading and extra crimping? I don't reload, so prefer the Glock 20 or a 4 inch 629 for this use.
 

4sallypat

Active Member
#23
If you really think you need a 10mm, get a real one....http://smith-wessonforum.com/s-w-revolvers-1980-present/112118-mdl-657-classic-hunter-ii.html
No sense pansying around.
And as our resident expert will quickly confirm, if 6 won't solve your problem, 15 won't.
For backcountry carry, a wheelgun is hard to beat and a 5-6.5" barrel puts you in another time zone for ballistics.
For open carry, you will see me with a SW 386 XL Hunter, 7rds, 30 ounces, 6" barrel.
Hey, this brings back memories - I had a 657 with a 610 barrel screwed on it for 10mm since the 610 were so rare.
Funny how the 610 parts are readily available but the frame was not.

So that's why I had the custom made 657/610 revolver with full moon clip 10mm revolver for ICORE competition....

Another reason for 10mm:
wide variety of rounds you can load up -
  • 135gr super fast 1500 fps JHP for 2 legged predators
  • 155-180gr subsonic loads for competition
  • 220gr heavy hard cast for 4 legged bear loads
 

steelydan

Newb seeking wisdom
#24
I also have a 329. Great carrying gun, less so for shooting! With normal factory ammo it's ok for me, with any of the hyperloads like the Buff Bore stuff, the recoil is unreal. Even with the reduced recoil stuff of Buff Bore, recoil is pretty 'sporty'. A fun gun to shoot, however, with 200 grain loads or .44 special rounds. I have had two issues with mine that make me nervous to use for a woods gun: 1) severe recoil causing bullets in the cylinder to jump their crimps and jam the cylinder. With factory Hornady 240 gr xtp ammo - it's happened 3 times with me and the cylinder was jammed until I could work the bullets back into the cases slightly with small tools...2) recoil causing the stupid little hammer lock thingy to engage, thereby making another shot impossible until I found the little S&W tool...I had a gunsmith take the lock out. So, I still have the issue of more than one bullet trying to go down-range, perhaps can be solved with reloading and extra crimping? I don't reload, so prefer the Glock 20 or a 4 inch 629 for this use.
Yep, bullets can jump crimp if you shoot hot loads out of light revolvers.
I had a 629-5 Classic and is was as light a 44m as I'd ever want to shoot.
I think for the Scandium weight class, 45acp(SW 325) or 357(386, 327) are the only practical cartridges.

I would really like the 327 R8 for the larger grip and 8rd capacity.
Also, the 5 inch barrel clears the holster easier than the 6 inch on the 386XL that I own.
If anyone wants to demo my revolver, let me know.
I'm a member at Renton Fish and Game.
 
#25
Yep, bullets can jump crimp if you shoot hot loads out of light revolvers.
I had a 629-5 Classic and is was as light a 44m as I'd ever want to shoot.
I think for the Scandium weight class, 45acp(SW 325) or 357(386, 327) are the only practical cartridges.

I would really like the 327 R8 for the larger grip and 8rd capacity.
Also, the 5 inch barrel clears the holster easier than the 6 inch on the 386XL that I own.
If anyone wants to demo my revolver, let me know.
I'm a member at Renton Fish and Game.
The amazing thing with the 329 is that bullets jump the crimps even with factory ammo!
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#28
As stated previously, I prefer a tactical thigh rig in the woods when not fishing; doesn't get in the way of anything, comfortable carry, & readily accessible.
 
#29
I've thought ab
As stated previously, I prefer a tactical thigh rig in the woods when not fishing; doesn't get in the way of anything, comfortable carry, & readily accessible.
ou
As stated previously, I prefer a tactical thigh rig in the woods when not fishing; doesn't get in the way of anything, comfortable carry, & readily accessible.
I've thought about those, especially for backpacking, but it's very brushy in northern Idaho and I think the thigh holster would get hung up a lot in brush? Good on trails and open country?
 

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