Glass & Grass Rod Casting 'clave August 8th in Redmond

#61
Found the ferrule plugs!
I looked through the grass at the park for a good 10 minutes and nothing. Then I followed the trajectory like a bloodhound to where my truck had been parked and voila! - there they were, laying on the asphalt.
I'm sure I'd folded them up in the camp chair and they fell out as I was putting it in the truck.

Glad you found the ferrule plugs Greg!

Mike
 
#62
I was so inspired by yesterday's casting bacchanal that I decided to take that 7' 4wt Chris Barclay prototype creekin' today. What a great performer for summer dry fly fishing on small mountain streams. Anyone else think Chris should put this rod into production?
I thought that was one sweet rod Tom!

Mike
 
#63
Looks like I missed a good gathering and opportunity to meet more local classic fly rod junkies. I am only 7 months into my new bamboo hobby and my first rod is only 1/2 built but it has been a blast so far. Met with Mike Monsos a couple of times for some help and inspiration. Hope to finish this first rod by the end of the year. I'll make sure to keep a watch out for the next gathering.

Dave Krismer
Snohomish, WA
 
#65
Looks like I missed a good gathering and opportunity to meet more local classic fly rod junkies. I am only 7 months into my new bamboo hobby and my first rod is only 1/2 built but it has been a blast so far. Met with Mike Monsos a couple of times for some help and inspiration. Hope to finish this first rod by the end of the year. I'll make sure to keep a watch out for the next gathering.

Dave Krismer
Snohomish, WA
Dave, sorry we didn't get a chance to meet you. Enjoy your first build, its a great learning experience and you picked a good one (Mike M) to get that early help and inspiration from. Ron
 

tonemike

fish'n glass
#67
I was so inspired by yesterday's casting bacchanal that I decided to take that 7' 4wt Chris Barclay prototype creekin' today. What a great performer for summer dry fly fishing on small mountain streams. Anyone else think Chris should put this rod into production?

This gem was my favorite little 4wt of the morning! i hope it was as nice streamside as it was in the park.
 
#69
I, too, loved that rod. I really like the Steffan 8' 4 piece 4/5 of Lugan's as well.
This was my first day ever casting bamboo and I had a great time. Some rods that stuck in my mind for various reasons:
Kent's T&T Special Trouter: a very nice, smooth casting rod
Para_Adams' Dennis Stone Cascade hollow built: Super fast action, could really put some force into that rod and throw a lot of line
Kent's Mike Monsos double parabolic: really unique feel in the hand, two distinct phases to the cast depending on amount of line
Dick's Mike Monsos Para 14: my favorite bamboo rod, the action really agreed with me, the rod seemed to just guide my casting motion into rhythm by itself, great fun
 

Lugan

Joe Streamer
#70
One more rod I loved and forgot about: The Tom Maxwell-built Leonard 39. It was a tippier dart thrower which I normally don't like, but this one was great. Also very good was the Morgan 8'6" 6wt Streamer Special which was a lot faster and more stable than the 7'6" 5wt of his that I owned briefly and sold.
 

tonemike

fish'n glass
#71
One more rod I loved and forgot about: The Tom Maxwell-built Leonard 39. It was a tippier dart thrower which I normally don't like, but this one was great. Also very good was the Morgan 8'6" 6wt Streamer Special which was a lot faster and more stable than the 7'6" 5wt of his that I owned briefly and sold.
I'd forgotten to mention Ron's Streamer Special. Liked the small fighting butt he put on it. I may do the same I mine!
 

Tim Cottage

Formerly tbc1415
#72
Two bamboo rods that surprised me.

Homer Jennings because it felt smooth and capable. Always a pleasant surprise. More or less casts itself with little effort and very positive turnover.
Mike Clark's, Gierach model because it felt a bit heavy and sluggish for its length even though I do like slower rods. Maybe that changes on the water as many rods do.

TC
 
#73
I felt like a kid in the candy store and my memory of all the rods blurred way too quickly. Two rods that stood out for me were the two extremes - The Orvis Flea was a hoot to try out, was that Kent's? It felt like the king of the tiny creeks…I could see myself chasing the little guys with small dries and having the time of my life. And on the other end of the spectrum Tom Bowden's 8-9" rod felt like it could cast a mile before you even realized you were trying. It could handle a day on the Yakima in hopper season and your wrist would hardly know you weren't swinging your old graphite. And all of the rods Mike Monsos built, whether he brought them or if they were brought by their new owners, were all beautiful and wonderful casters. Those who bought them from Mike are lucky folks for certain.

And one more to mention…perhaps my favorite rod to cast, but no surprise (I own one too)was Bruce's superb W&M Granger 8642 Victory with the original plastic protector still on the cork. That rod has a special magic in its taper. Love it. Ron
 
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#74
One of the fun things about bamboo rods is the variety of rods. We had an amazing number of rods, ranging from old classics to new designs. The ones that stood out for me were Mike Monsos's 7'10" version of Ray Gould's "double parabolic", and Tim Cottage's Constables. I also enjoyed casting Kent Lufkin's Orvis rods.

I sure hope we can do this again!

Tom
 

hbmcc

Active Member
#75
For my part, just watching you all casting and seeing how each rod performed was a pleasure. The stories connecting the toys to owner were just as valuable. I wish I could remember more. Names would be good.

I hefted Lugan's glass and intentionally avoided the white Barclay only because I knew a scribbled phone number would follow the cast of that temptation. My wife saw the sorted stack for the event. Need I say more?

I have read, and watched numerous YouTubes on making bamboo rods. Seeing Mike's display, hearing his explanations, holding and casting and watching the rods he made being cast is far more meaningful. I have poured over Gould's books of bamboo tapers. Kent's rod of Gould's double parabolic built by Mike spoke subtly of power and why so many of Gould's tapers are in this design and construction range. I think we all want to see how far the old materials can evolve to complement the newest.

Dick's century-old sentimental ?Leonard? wore its age gracefully. On first glance, I thought it was drooping, tired in the butt. People snigger at the pace of bamboo. Watching this rod in Dick's and Tim's hands had one description: sedate. I delighted in pointing out the broken rods Tom brought, Scotch-taped. I admired an experimenter's confidence in technical assessment of rod joints in spliced, graphite, metal ferrule, even none. He had built and fished those designs.

Begging Ron to try my Victory that I am too afraid of elicited a complaint about the plastic protector on the handle. Almost every rod I own still has plastic on the handle, so that distraction is not on my own radar. I think my disagreement with Victory is that I am just jealous of something that is about my age (older) still in diapers while I anticipate the latest in bionic innovations to repair normal wear and tear of age. And then, while identifying my eBay Charity Rod I didn't want, that actually, finally, felt good in my hands--I think, only because it was light and didn't hurt--I forgot telling of the $7.25 mistake to Monsos, who found it all humorous.

What we missed was the crackle, licking streamers, and scent of fire. Stories hurried out in the few minutes allowed could have matured into the next day's zombie cup of Joe. Of course, midnight visits by the Sheriff from 35 miles over the pass just don't seem to fit in next to the Microsoft Campus; and Redmond police. Perhaps, this postscript is the next morning for me.

So, did anyone get a fishing loaner out of this event? :D
 

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