Cast Iron: Show Me Yours!!

Buck

"Ride'n Dirty."
#46
Cooking up a few of the profits from the day's harvest. This little spot pumped out a fair amount until word got out. Jumped ship the next day and hit paydirt. Worked those hills over for about 3 weeks with hardly a soul around until the summer heat dried things up.

View attachment 110324

Chicken fried steak and morels. This was a pretty big departure from the usual fare of gas station food:eek:

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That looks amazing!
 

dld

Active Member
#47
So looking up Lodge cooking wear....Those who have used satisfied? Bought a 10" 1.5" deep skillet. In first test run in was good. Need to rplace a couple items...just looking for opinions.
I wouldn't live without my lodge skillet. Sure I'd love to have my great grandmother's pan, but my mother is using it. It's black gold...pretty much a mirror that nothing can mar. Lodge is the easiest, fastest way to get into cast iron cooking. It's also cheap enough that if you decide it isn't for you, you can bail without much investment.

Look for the treasures, if you want, later.

I have a lodge 10.5 which accounts for much of my cooking. I also have an 8" cast skillet which I saved from my great-aunt's place 15yrs ago--it had been hanging in a barn for probably 25yrs before that.

It's kinda funny, my mother had my great-grandmother's large skillet forever, but it was relegated to storage until one night when my dad cooked (a rarity) and pulled it out. My mother saw how easily it cleaned, so she started using it. Odd thing, tho, it took a long time before she 'learned' how to clean it, so dad always did it...I think that may have been part of mom's motive.

Now she uses cast iron for most things.
 

Freestone

Not to be confused with freestoneangler
#48
Rare-ish #6 "ERIE" (pre-Griswold) pan. Circa 1880-1905. A Value Village find. Paid $6 bucks. Was covered in crud and rust but brought it back to life with the help of lye and vinegar:)

Dave

I just check the skillet my 86 yr old mom keeps on her stove and uses regularly. It's an Erie from the third series, c. 1892-1905. Unfortunately, she no longer remembers which grandparent gave it to her.

image.jpg
 

SHD

Active Member
#50
I've stomped em, drowned em, and shot em. Used to work on a fly ranch and had them in cabins where the food was and guests could see. We were ruthless.
To the OP, I have a large skillet, medium skillet, and medium with the grill lines on it. All are Lodge, and I love em. They just get better and better. A couple months ago Fred Meyer had a BOGO sale on Lodge... I should have spent more but only got my two mediums View attachment 116113
Nice, those grill pans are pretty sweet. I need to add one of those to my stack.
 

SHD

Active Member
#51
I just check the skillet my 86 yr old mom keeps on her stove and uses regularly. It's an Erie from the third series, c. 1892-1905. Unfortunately, she no longer remembers which grandparent gave it to her.

View attachment 118565
That's a sweet pan right there, love the Erie stuff. It's no wonder many companies used the Erie/Griswold patterns latter on. There is a nice selection of older CI at a booth in the antique mall in Cashmere that is worth checking out, FYI. Here is a picture of the original factory in Erie, PA.

 

TexBC

Fly Addict
#54
Man, this stuff is COOL. My Dad rarely cooked when I was growing up, but when he did, he always did so using a cast iron skillet... pancakes, pepper steak, and hashbrowns were the usual suspects. I wonder if he still has it?

Dammit, now you guys have awoken a new interest I didn't realize I even had!
 

bconrad

Active Member
#55
Not to derail this thread but do any of you guys have tried and true methods for reconditioning a cast iron skillet?

I have a lodge that I bought 5 years ago or so but despite regular use it's never built up that mirror finish, and it's far from non stick. I can't cook potatoes or fry eggs cause they stick too much.

I'd like to scour it out and reseason it, would appreciate any advice.
 

Jeff Dodd

Active Member
#56
Not to derail this thread but do any of you guys have tried and true methods for reconditioning a cast iron skillet?

I have a lodge that I bought 5 years ago or so but despite regular use it's never built up that mirror finish, and it's far from non stick. I can't cook potatoes or fry eggs cause they stick too much.

I'd like to scour it out and reseason it, would appreciate any advice.

If you have a FB account join this group
https://www.facebook.com/groups/castironenthusiasts/?ref=ts&fref=ts

Lots of knowledge there and information about reconditioning old skillets. I have had good luck with the Cone, I think they call it the Crisco 500 method.
 

jersey

livin' the dream
#58
Not to derail this thread but do any of you guys have tried and true methods for reconditioning a cast iron skillet?

I have a lodge that I bought 5 years ago or so but despite regular use it's never built up that mirror finish, and it's far from non stick. I can't cook potatoes or fry eggs cause they stick too much.

I'd like to scour it out and reseason it, would appreciate any advice.
Cool article by Sheryl is great, thanks Geared
Lower heat and longer cook time can eliminate some sticking too. Don't need high heat with CI.

We don't really clean our pans too much either, my opinion is pre heating kills the bad bugs...
 

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