NFR Private Well Water

seaalki

Active Member
With a well, you are your own municipality as dittohead likes to say, you would be very surprised what is in the water table around you, its pretty cheap peace of mind and you can do many tests yourself, this site: http://terrylove.com/forums/index.php?forums/water-softener-forum-problems-installation-and-r.22/ is the holy grail, any question/questions usually get immediate answers, dittohead, Bannerman, Reach4, are as good as it gets in all things water, best plumbing/ water site on the web, most plumbing/water purification outfits are trying to sell you " there " products, these guys " give " you incredibly valuable free information, its very complex, be prepared for your head to start spinning.
 

jeff bandy

Make my day
Get it tested. You have no idea what someone else uphill has dumped. Some of the worst things we ever used are just now showing up in some systems. That water could have taken decades to get to you.
 

Old406Kid

Active Member
I would start with your county health dept. as many of these offer this for a nominal fee.
If you're new to a property I would suggest establishing a base line and then periodic testing going forward. Most agencies recommend annually but it's whatever you're comfortable with.

Madison
County Health Department
7 Placer Loop
Virginia City MT 59755
(406) 843-5395
[email protected]
 

kmudgn

Active Member
I am on a well in NH where I live (345 deep). It was tested when I moved in about 20 years ago for Radon/Arsenic (problems in NH) and other contaminants. No issues and no reason to re-test. The only problem I have is that the water is very very hard. I could have put in a softener system, but I just live with it. Hard water is supposed to be heart healthy anyway.
 

freestoneangler

Not to be confused with Freestone
Thanks all. We decided the $100 is worth knowing water quality. That price includes a bacterial, nitrates, metals, pH, TDS, and conductivity. In speaking with some locals, it seems most don't test except when the well was originally commissioned. @kmudgn, I've not heard about that benefit of hard water.
 

Robert Engleheart

Robert
WFF Supporter
Thanks all. We decided the $100 is worth knowing water quality. That price includes a bacterial, nitrates, metals, pH, TDS, and conductivity. In speaking with some locals, it seems most don't test except when the well was originally commissioned. @kmudgn, I've not heard about that benefit of hard water.
My dentist told me hard water creates harder teeth and bones in people.
 

freestoneangler

Not to be confused with Freestone
This two sites have some information about health effects.

http://water-research.net/index.php/water-treatment/tools/hard-water-hardness
http://www.freedrinkingwater.com/water_health/health1/1-get-healthier-heart-with-water.htm

The other useful thing we'll get from the investment is the chemistry which is needed to calculate adjustments to the water softener system the home has. It uses a flow meter to trigger the backflush and regeneration (cleaning) of the plastic media tank. It seems to be set to high as the water feels a bit too soft for a period of time following the cycle. Great, another mini technical project, one that includes math calculations, to keep me from getting bored.
 
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