Tying Position

Kilchis

WFF Supporter
This item allows a person to sit or stand at their work surface as preference changes through the day. It seems as though it could be applicable to tying. I'm sure a number of vendors sell it. Illustrations for clarity only so spare me the WalMart angst.
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761C1D41-84BE-42A1-A2F2-64EDE771D0F4.jpeg
 

jaredoconnor

WFF Supporter
This item allows a person to sit or stand at their work surface as preference changes through the day.

I worked at two companies that tried these, to avoid replacing all the desks with proper standing desks. Let's just say... after wasting a lot of money on those, both companies ended up replacing all the desks with proper standing desks. :p

At work, we have the fancy ones with motors. I just use a cheap manual one, from IKEA, at home. See below. They are not very expensive and I'm sure there's even cheaper ones around.

 

longputt

Active Member
I worked at two companies that tried these, to avoid replacing all the desks with proper standing desks. Let's just say... after wasting a lot of money on those, both companies ended up replacing all the desks with proper standing desks. :p

At work, we have the fancy ones with motors. I just use a cheap manual one, from IKEA, at home. See below. They are not very expensive and I'm sure there's even cheaper ones around.

That looks beefy enough to let me tie bass flies with kevlar thread!
 

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
I worked at two companies that tried these, to avoid replacing all the desks with proper standing desks. Let's just say... after wasting a lot of money on those, both companies ended up replacing all the desks with proper standing desks. :p

At work, we have the fancy ones with motors. I just use a cheap manual one, from IKEA, at home. See below. They are not very expensive and I'm sure there's even cheaper ones around.

@longputt Though it was an old thread but I see where your going.
They swept through our building about 3 years ago. I think 2 people work at standing desks now. (Before we were sent home. )I don't care for the standing podium work stations and use them as little as possible, even in the classroom (they are one size fit all and after 4-6 hr's of running gis and cad class on the computer it hurts).
IT at work and my PT people (been in PT off/on for 20yrs) helped set me up a seated position at work in my office so my arm doesn't tingle or go dead and my lower back doesn't lock up. I can set up a tying station similar, but I still have to get up and move. After years of working on my feet cooking, surveying and teaching I'd recommend good, sturdy, supportive footwear when standing at a desk for any length of time if you go that way.
 

longputt

Active Member
@longputt Though it was an old thread but I see where your going.
They swept through our building about 3 years ago. I think 2 people work at standing desks now. (Before we were sent home. )I don't care for the standing podium work stations and use them as little as possible, even in the classroom (they are one size fit all and after 4-6 hr's of running gis and cad class on the computer it hurts).
IT at work and my PT people (been in PT off/on for 20yrs) helped set me up a seated position at work in my office so my arm doesn't tingle or go dead and my lower back doesn't lock up. I can set up a tying station similar, but I still have to get up and move. After years of working on my feet cooking, surveying and teaching I'd recommend good, sturdy, supportive footwear when standing at a desk for any length of time if you go that way.
I was headed for surgery for a pinched nerve but a new arm rest on my desk chair (and truck) made a huge difference. I still get a little numbness from my tricep and occasionally drop things but my severe headaches are gone. So I was curious how how others were dealing with ergonomics when tying flies. I like the ides of standing but supporting my arm is probably more important.
 

MGTom

Living at the place of many waters
WFF Supporter
I was headed for surgery for a pinched nerve but a new arm rest on my desk chair (and truck) made a huge difference. I still get a little numbness from my tricep and occasionally drop things but my severe headaches are gone. So I was curious how how others were dealing with ergonomics when tying flies. I like the ides of standing but supporting my arm is probably more important.
Sounds awfully familiar. Standing wasn't for me. Seated, feet flat, chair correct height knees 90 degrees, back straight, desk at height of bottom of elbows, flat forearms and wrists, and keeping the work on the desk close, not reaching, was the trick for me. Get the monitor, or tying work, at a netral point so you don't look too up or down. I look down just a bit so I don't reach up too much. Good luck, I have occasional issues but I'm good more often than not.
Luckily most days I can hold the rod like in my avatar, but only with some movement and no higher, and not for long periods. No all day high sticking/contact nymphing, but I do enjoy it.
 
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