NFR Yard/garden Thread 2017

Buzzy

Active Member
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Cherry tomatoes ripening, three varieties of heirloom tomatoes, ripe and delicious.

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Japanese eggplants - sliced thin and fried with garlic and fresh grated ginger root, amazing!

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far too many apricots for us and our next door neighbors.

Basil is cut back, enjoying pesto two or three times a week. Oh, the strawberries and raspberries are done but is there anything better than strawberry/rhubarb pie? Yes: strawberry/rhubarb/raspberry pie!
 
Here's my little fence project that's been keeping me off the water and away from the tying bench.

Lots of improvements on the radar around here, but new fencing and gates in front are near the top of the list. Besides the old fence falling apart, I always thought it was dumb that the original owners set the fence at the back of the house. Lots of wasted, unusable "front yard" space. Fortunately my neighbor agreed and we decided to bring our fence lines forward.

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Simple enough, except for a couple problems to work around. First, the slope where the new fence line will be was too steep (sideways) for my neighbor to put in a gate, or have a reasonably level path. So about 20 wheelbarrow loads if dirt later, I had an acceptably graded surface.

The second problem was how to place the first post against the existing crappy fence without taking it down, or it simply falling over. Initially I thought I'd just dig up to the existing post and place the new one against it, since it appeared to be set directly into the ground without concrete. Except there was concrete hiding almost a foot below the surface. Yet another hallmark of great "craftsmanship" from the builder that I'm having to deal with .

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My work around was to screw some 4x4 spacers to the old post and butt the new post against. But not before compacting 6" of gravel to set it on and painting it with preservative.

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New post plumbed in and secured in compacted 5/8" minus. No concrete necessary. One down, 8 more to go!

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Buzzy

Active Member
Heres my little fence project that's been keeping me off the water and tying bench.

Lots of improvements on the radar around here but new fencing and gates in front are near the top of the list. Besides the old fence falling apart, I always thought it was dumb that the original owners set the fence at the back of the house. Lots of wasted, unusable space. Fortunately my neighbor agreed and we decided to bring our fence lines forward.

View attachment 148532

Simple enough, except for a couple problems to work around. First, the slope where the new fence line will be was too steep for my neighbor to put in a gate. So about 20 wheelbarrow loads if dirt later, I had an acceptably graded surface.

The second problem was how to place the first post against the existing crappy fence without taking it down. Initially i thought I'd just dig up to the existing post and place the new one against it since it appeared to be set directly into the ground without concrete. Except there was concrete hiding almost a foot below the surface.

View attachment 148536

My work around was to screw some 4x4 spacers to the old post and butt the new post against. But not before it after compacting 6" of gravel to set it on and painting it with preservative.

View attachment 148537

New post plumbed in and secured in compacted 5/8" minus. No concrete necessary. One down, 8 more to go!

View attachment 148540
The first thing I notice when looking into your post hole: you don't live in Grant (rock pile) County! My last little project, with only three post holes, took a full day to dig. Breaker bar. Nice job!
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater
My plants look like shit but they've produced great in this hot weather.
Even eating multiple tomatoes per day I can't keep up with them.
I've told all the neighbors to help themselves.

The family next door has been getting good use out of them.
They grow a bunch of basil and made me a big batch of killer homemade pesto.
SF

IMG_3797.JPG
 
The first thing I notice when looking into your post hole: you don't live in Grant (rock pile) County! My last little project, with only three post holes, took a full day to dig. Breaker bar. Nice job!
Maybe no rocks but that's compacted clay. I finally took a file and put a sharp edge on my post hole shovel to break through that stuff. The edges of the post hole felt and looked like the inside of a clay pot. The upside is that the ground is so solid, compacted gravel works as well as concrete. Better really since it drains. That post should outlast me.
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
Tomatoes are going gang busters. Not complaining since the flavor is so much better than store bought. I built a tomato house cuz it usually doesn't get hot enough in western WA to ripen tomatoes. That hasn't been the case these last couple of summers. It gets so hot that the leaves are curling on my tomato plants because they get too hot according to my horticulturist sister.

Peas and green beans are about done. Second planting of carrots is beginning to show. Haven't done this before, so it will be interesting to see how it works out. My WW sweet onions are kind of small; maybe planted too close together or shaded by adjacent row of taller plants.

Speaking of fences, if it weren't for my deer fence exclosure, I couldn't have a garden. Damn deer are vermin and a gardener's nightmare around here.
 
Tomatoes are going gang busters. Not complaining since the flavor is so much better than store bought. I built a tomato house cuz it usually doesn't get hot enough in western WA to ripen tomatoes. That hasn't been the case these last couple of summers. It gets so hot that the leaves are curling on my tomato plants because they get too hot according to my horticulturist sister.

Peas and green beans are about done. Second planting of carrots is beginning to show. Haven't done this before, so it will be interesting to see how it works out. My WW sweet onions are kind of small; maybe planted too close together or shaded by adjacent row of taller plants.

Speaking of fences, if it weren't for my deer fence exclosure, I couldn't have a garden. Damn deer are vermin and a gardener's nightmare around here.
I'm jealous reading about all the harvesting going on. I didn't get anything planted this spring when I was working on the #$%#!!! SUV. Only had one deer in our yard in the 9 years we've been here. Rabbits however, have been a problem since think something happened to the redtail hawk population around here. Haven't seen any in quite a while. Might have to get the .22 out before planting season next spring (shorts should work at close range and be relatively safe in a residential area - I'm also gubermint trained in firearms).
 

Buzzy

Active Member
My plants look like shit but they've produced great in this hot weather.
Even eating multiple tomatoes per day I can't keep up with them.
I've told all the neighbors to help themselves.

The family next door has been getting good use out of them.
They grow a bunch of basil and made me a big batch of killer homemade pesto.
SF

View attachment 148541
Grab (beg, borrow?) a handful of the basil, chop it fine, chop a couple ripe tomatoes, stir 'em together, a little olive oil, salt and pepper and spoon it on hot, crusty and crispy garlic bread. With on of your salmon? Mmmmmmm bruschetta!
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This is an oxhart heirloom. Maybe the sweetest ever!
 
2nd weekend down the tubes and still not finished with the fence, and haven't even started on the gates. Worse, one of the posts might be pushing an eighth out of plumb! Friggen OCD.

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