Sanding paint off new fiberglass blank??? Anyone tried this?

Mike Ediger

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I just got a new Proof fiberglass blank, and would really like to have the "raw" or unpainted look, rather than the painted if possible. I emailed Matt at Proof and he said to give it a try, and that it shouldn't hurt anything. Has anyone tried this before? It isn't a terribly expensive blank, but I also don't want to ruin it. Any suggestions, hints, or cautions? Recommendations on sand paper progression?
This is the blank I purchased https://www.proofflyfishing.com/col...lanks/products/devon-8-6-5wt-fiberglass-blank
Thanks,
Mike
 

veilside180sx

Active Member
It'll be fine. Best if you have a powered rod lathe. I'd use 400 then 600 grit wet/dry. Make sure the sand paper stays nice & wet. You dont want too much heat.

The better question is...if the raw doesn't look as good as you hoped...are you prepared to re-paint it.


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Mike Ediger

Active Member
WFF Supporter
It'll be fine. Best if you have a powered rod lathe. I'd use 400 then 600 grit wet/dry. Make sure the sand paper stays nice & wet. You dont want too much heat.

The better question is...if the raw doesn't look as good as you hoped...are you prepared to re-paint it.

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Thanks, I wonder if my Sully Rod Wrapper is strong enough to keep turning with pressure of sanding? Good question about liking the raw look. The reality is I am not repainting regardless, so I better like it.
Thanks for the suggestions.
Mike
 

veilside180sx

Active Member
I only asked that...because I've sanded quite a few rods over the years...and not all look good naked depending on the layup schedule of the materials. About 1/2 of them...I wound up repainting.

Most power rod wrappers are powered by sewing machine motors. They are just fine for sanding. You'll cut your sandpaper into a strip of 1-2" wide and 4-5" long...start at one end (I typically started at the butt end) and work your way forward. The last foot you'll likely have to do by hand to be very gentle with the tip.
 

Mike Ediger

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I only asked that...because I've sanded quite a few rods over the years...and not all look good naked depending on the layup schedule of the materials. About 1/2 of them...I wound up repainting.
You've got me second guessing myself now. I didn't realize there could be different or bad looking blanks.


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MattB

Active Member
On these chinese glass blanks sometimes (pretty much all the time) the ferrule/glue work is god awful ugly. I would recommend citristrip and a credit card....I've stripped a scrap blank before as a test and it was a pain in the ass. Honestly wouldn't want to sand a blank in risk of compromising the blank itself.
 

Steve Kokita

FISHON206
So Mike, did you ever sand and finish this rod? I redid my first glass fly rod, a 7’6” 5wt Phillipson. Had to sand the paint off, matte white blank, wrapped it with green, gave it an agate stripper, Ray Lee seat and new grip.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
I manufactured several hundred fiberglass rod blanks and i can tell you every step of the is extraordinarily difficult.
It's difficult to cut, its impossible to keep clean, it doesn't stick to the mandrel, it won't stay rolled up, it won't come off the mandrel as a straight part, it destroys sanding belts.

If a manufacturer got all that work done successfully the last thing i would do is mess with it.
 

longputt

Active Member
You might try a chemical stripper for the paint but be careful it doesn't impact the resin. Also be careful that the paint is not on there to avoid moisture pick-up. For recreational items, you can use cheap resins and seal with paint but the cheap resins are prone to moisture pick-up and lose their strength (dramatically). The paint may be a sealer. You wouldn't want to paint an airplane for a sealer but a fly-rod that gets used occasionally it's OK.


it destroys sanding belts.
This is so true, I've made quite a few carbon and glass fiber composite parts over the years. The wear and tear on equipment from glass is amazing. Using chopped carbon (or nano-tubes) for filleting additives is night and day compared to Silica or Titania, it is easy to sand or machine if you use high speeds.
 

Mike Ediger

Active Member
WFF Supporter
So Mike, did you ever sand and finish this rod? I redid my first glass fly rod, a 7’6” 5wt Phillipson. Had to sand the paint off, matte white blank, wrapped it with green, gave it an agate stripper, Ray Lee seat and new grip.
Sorry Steve I just saw this. I did not sand the blank. I just kept second-guessing and didn’t really want to ruin it so I wrapped it as is. I did however get a unpainted Kabuto and absolutely love the look of it.
 

Steve Kokita

FISHON206
Which color was the blank you were going to sand? The paint on my Phillipson was fairly thick, but sanded of ok with sandpaper and steel wool. The bare white color is cool and I also have my dad’s mint original bought at the same time but rarely fished. I’d still rather play with bamboo!
 

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