Beans?

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#4
Hmmmm, I'll see if I have the recipe around. They called them cowboy beans, but told me they're aka ranch beans. Pretty simple and tasty. Was my relatives long time friend who was an old school cowboy/ranch hand in Texas. Haven't made them in years but think I know where I put the recipe.
 

Alex MacDonald

that's His Lordship, to you.....
#5
I start with a pound of pinto beans, enough water in a pot to cover them by about an inch an a half, and once they're a-boilin` for about an hour, I toss in a hamhock, a diced onion, and a couple of chopped up tomatoes. Reduce the heat to simmer. Another two hours goes by (check the water level frequently and stir), and I'll check to see if the beans are getting tender-watch for the skin cracking. If they are, i'll toss in 3-4 cloves of chopped garlic, two chopped jalapenos, seeds and all, some salt, a shot of bourbon, a little beer, some dehydrated cumin and a handful of fresh cilantro. I'll wait about a half hour, check the seasoning, and they're ready. My recipe's actually pretty similar to Kent's.
 

KerryS

Ignored Member
#6
Navy beans (soaked or parboiled), ham hock(s), small finely chopped carrot, bay leaf or two, enough water to cover, simmer until beans are almost tender, remove hocks and pull meat from them, return meat to beans, add one chopped onion, third of a bottle or so hot sauce, salt, pepper to taste, finish simmering until beans are tender, serve with crusty bread.
 

Alex MacDonald

that's His Lordship, to you.....
#9
Don't make 'em to salute. They are for burning on the way in and the way out. Mighty fine eating after a cold, wet day steelhead fishing or any other winter activity.
yeah, if we make `em hot enough, they're the gift that gives both on the way in, and the way out.....:eek:
 

Jaydub

Active Member
#10
As a kid, I used to love these baked beans. When I made them as an adult I thought they were too sweet. So I cut back on the sugar and maybe add some heat.

Boil 2 cups of dry beans in plenty of water (about 2 ½ hours) Never stir.
Place in baking dish
Add: ½ to ¾ cup brown sugar
¼ to 1/3 cup molasses
½ can tomatoes or 1 small can tomato sauce
1 ½ tsp salt
½ tsp dry mustard
1 small onion chopped

Cover with bacon strips.
Bake about 2 hours or until excess moisture is gone.
 

Porter

Active Member
#11
I always have liked most (cowboy/ranch style) baked beans on the second day or reheat up/go around. Seems flavors of sweet and bacon (salty) have blended better and just yum! So I vote for twice cooked baked beans just saying.
 

hbmcc

Active Member
#12
A can
A hand full of needles, small sticks
A match
A p-38
And a flat stick, if no spoon.

When the lid pops they are done.
 

2506

Active Member
#13
A can
A hand full of needles, small sticks
A match
A p-38
And a flat stick, if no spoon.

When the lid pops they are done.
I love a good p-38. Completely underappreciated key-ring, ashtray, tacklebox, glovebox, cup-holder, pocket accessory. If I ever go out into the woods without one of those and a corkscrew, I feel unprepared.
 
#14
Alex: that's a great recipe you got there.

I grew up in a rural part of Texas, and Mom pretty regularly cooked up a big batch of pinto beans in a large stewpot.

Down there, the custom was to have plenty of liquid in the pot of beans because most of time we ate them not out of a plate but out of a deep-sided soup bowls. Mom would make a big batch of cornbread cooked in cast iron skillets to go with the beans.

We'd crumble up one big piece of cornbread in the bowl, ladle the beans and the bean liquid over it, and add a dab of butter and a couple spoonfuls of homemade picante or salsa on top.

And we'd have a second piece of cornbread with butter and honey on a small plate next to bowl of beans.

Big glass of iced tea or milk.

Sit down and feast.
 

TDub

Active Member
#15
Alex: that's a great recipe you got there.

I grew up in a rural part of Texas, and Mom pretty regularly cooked up a big batch of pinto beans in a large stewpot.

Down there, the custom was to have plenty of liquid in the pot of beans because most of time we ate them not out of a plate but out of a deep-sided soup bowls. Mom would make a big batch of cornbread cooked in cast iron skillets to go with the beans.

We'd crumble up one big piece of cornbread in the bowl, ladle the beans and the bean liquid over it, and add a dab of butter and a couple spoonfuls of homemade picante or salsa on top.

And we'd have a second piece of cornbread with butter and honey on a small plate next to bowl of beans.

Big glass of iced tea or milk.

Sit down and feast.
That's exactly how we did it. Almost every Saturday night. I was also raised in Texas. Then we would use the left over cornbread to put into milk for snacks. Sounds weird, but good.
 

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