NFR Advice on my first digital camera

Tugs

Just Keep Fishing
#1
Hi,
I'm looking into my first digital camera and there are too many options. I take a lot of pics with my iPhone but it's time to grow up!
I'd like to use for spur of the moment shots and to catch the Northern Lights here in the Washington area.
I have a budget of under $600.
Any tips or advice would help


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Tugs

Just Keep Fishing
#3
I'll have to do some research. No idea what a Dslr is but can probably take a guess on the point and shoot does...lol
 

Josh

dead in the water
#4
One of the easiest ways to narrow it down is:

Do you want something with a fixed lens, or do you want to be able to switch lenses?
 

Tugs

Just Keep Fishing
#5
One of the easiest ways to narrow it down is:

Do you want something with a fixed lens, or do you want to be able to switch lenses?
I'd like to be able to change lenses per need. I really want to take panoramic shots and Northern light shots and not sure if changing lenses is required?
 

Josh

dead in the water
#6
I'd like to be able to change lenses per need. I really want to take panoramic shots and Northern light shots and not sure if changing lenses is required?
Probably not really required for that sort of use. But generally, the ability to change lenses is always better than not being able to. It just increases your costs.
 

Tugs

Just Keep Fishing
#7
Probably not really required for that sort of use. But generally, the ability to change lenses is always better than not being able to. It just increases your costs.
Can you recommend a DSLR and a point and shoot? I'd like to take a look at both to contrast and compare.
 
#9
I have a Sony A6300 mirrorless camera. Small and light. Interchangable lenses. Takes great photos and 4K videos. Has a setting for "no brains needed" as well as some of the more "enthusiast" modes. I ditched my big DSLR, a Nikon D810 and went small. Well worth the switch. Big DSLR's are a pain in the ass unless you fancy yourself as a semi pro..

But it exceeds your budget at around $950 with lens.

The older model, Sony A6000 is still available and is just as good, with a few less features. I think they can be had for $650 with lens.
 
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hbmcc

Active Member
#10
Get something you can stuff into a pocket. That's the reason why you use an iPhone--convenience. I still use the neck strap after oopsing a few untethered ones into digital hell. I found image stabilization a godsend.

Mine is too old, Canon Powershot G10, and it is on the edge of too big and ball and chain. But it does cool stuff. There should be something that fits by now.

I have a dslr, with a bag of bank-killing lenses, parked on a shelf. The suitcase is an extra requirement. Some day, I may be a new Ansel Adams, but the 4x5 is too small; and didn't help.
 

Tugs

Just Keep Fishing
#11
Get something you can stuff into a pocket. That's the reason why you use an iPhone--convenience. I still use the neck strap after oopsing a few untethered ones into digital hell. I found image stabilization a godsend.

Mine is too old, Canon Powershot G10, and it is on the edge of too big and ball and chain. But it does cool stuff. There should be something that fits by now.

I have a dslr, with a bag of bank-killing lenses, parked on a shelf. The suitcase is an extra requirement. Some day, I may be a new Ansel Adams, but the 4x5 is too small; and didn't help.
thanks. I'm seeing that some of these smaller pocket size cameras are very powerful. I am reading about the Sony RX100 20.2 MP. It looks very portable and full of features. Just the first that crossed my path so I'll analyze this purchase to death like I do when buy fly gear.
 

KerryS

Ignored Member
#12
I'd like to be able to change lenses per need. I really want to take panoramic shots and Northern light shots and not sure if changing lenses is required?
My two cents. A DSLR is likely overkill for you and a waste of money unless you have money to burn. To get the benefits of a DSLR one should have a good understanding of composition, light, aperture, shutter speed, white balance, focal point, depth of field, just to name a few. Sure you can set your $800.00 camera on auto continuous fire, attached your $400.00 zoom lens to it, shoot away and get a good photo out of a hundred but in reality a decent point and shoot at half the cost is going to give you the same thing.
 

Tugs

Just Keep Fishing
#13
My two cents. A DSLR is likely overkill for you and a waste of money unless you have money to burn. To get the benefits of a DSLR one should have a good understanding of composition, light, aperture, shutter speed, white balance, focal point, depth of field, just to name a few. Sure you can set your $800.00 camera on auto continuous fire, attached your $400.00 zoom lens to it, shoot away and get a good photo out of a hundred but in reality a decent point and shoot at half the cost is going to give you the same thing.
thanks for the feedback.
 

Josh

dead in the water
#14
There are essentially three main classes of cameras:

1. Point and shoot cameras

If you are going to get a point and shoot, the only one to bother with is a waterproof "tough" camera. Otherwise a recent smartphone can do everything an point and shoot can (for the most part) and some things better. I prefer the Olympus cameras in this range.

2. Fixed lens "prosumer" cameras

This can be a pretty wide group. Everything from "superzooms" like the Nikon Coolpix B700 to single focal length cameras with DSLR sized sensors like the Fujifilm X100F. Most all of these camera have more manual controls, more features, and better image quality (sometimes a LOT better) than point and shoot cameras.

3. DSLR or Mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras.

These are what most people think of as a "real" camera. The cameras that sports and national geographic photographers use. The most features and the best image quality, for sure. But also the largest package and highest price.
 

Tugs

Just Keep Fishing
#15
There are essentially three main classes of cameras:

1. Point and shoot cameras

If you are going to get a point and shoot, the only one to bother with is a waterproof "tough" camera. Otherwise a recent smartphone can do everything an point and shoot can (for the most part) and some things better. I prefer the Olympus cameras in this range.

2. Fixed lens "prosumer" cameras

This can be a pretty wide group. Everything from "superzooms" like the Nikon Coolpix B700 to single focal length cameras with DSLR sized sensors like the Fujifilm X100F. Most all of these camera have more manual controls, more features, and better image quality (sometimes a LOT better) than point and shoot cameras.

3. DSLR or Mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras.

These are what most people think of as a "real" camera. The cameras that sports and national geographic photographers use. The most features and the best image quality, for sure. But also the largest package and highest price.
Thanks Josh.


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