Reference Technique of the day

#2
Minimizing Stream Current Drag: Mending your line by throwing a loop of line into the drifting line can help it to move at the same speed as the current, reducing current drag. Depending on the cast and the drift situation, appropriate mends may be upstream, downstream, or a series of 'S' mends.

 
#5
I'm going to attempt to keep this thread on topic.

Here's another. So that's two for today.

"S" Cast: A cast used to put deliberate and controlled slack into a cast; used in getting a drag-free float and in conjunction with mending line (see Drag, Dead Drift, Mending Line).

 
#6
Current Seam (or Seam): Current seams are formed by the nature of current flow. Usually the middle of a river or stream contains the fastest flow with its edges having slower flows due to friction with the bank and the streambed obstacles. A stream channel's curvature redirects its heaviest flow away from the remainder of the stream creating current seams.

 
#7
A bit more on drag free line drift.

Mending Line:
A method used after the line is on the water to achieve a drag-free float. It constitutes a flip, or series of flips with the rod tip, that puts a horseshoe shaped bow in the line. This slows the speed with which the line travels if mended upstream and speeds up the line if mended downstream. For example: If a cast is made across the flow of the stream and the fastest part of the current is on your side of the water, an upstream mend would be required to slow the rate of the line's drift downstream. Thus, your line will better keep pace with the fly traveling in the slower water on the far side of the main current.
 
#9
Here's a good small stream cast.

River Load (or Water Tension) Cast: This is a cast, motion or technique where the caster uses the river's current to load the rod. Let the line get straight and almost 90 degrees in relation to the rod tip. Point the rod down toward the water. Using a side arm motion, quickly move the rod toward the target. The force of the river's current and your motion against the current will quickly load the fly rod.

 
#10
Roll Cast: This is a main cast every fly fisher should master. It can be used to cast short to medium distances - 15 to 30 feet of line. It can also be used as a means of picking up the line off the water. When performed properly, this cast can deliver small dry flies to large nymphs.

 

Jeremy Floyd

fly fishing my way through life
#11
Roll Cast: This is a main cast every fly fisher should master. It can be used to cast short to medium distances - 15 to 30 feet of line. It can also be used as a means of picking up the line off the water. When performed properly, this cast can deliver small dry flies to large nymphs.

The roll cast is good for the entire length of the line, and can be shot with a double haul, just like overhead casting. A touch-and-go roll cast can be shot an amazing distance.
 

weiliwen

Active Member
#13
Mending is my major weakness (in fly fishing, at least). These are good videos.

I do better roll casting. Years ago, even though I had two decades of fly fishing experience, I roll casted terribly, rarely exceeding 15 feet. My local fly club had a twice-annual casting clinic. My cast went from 15 to 40 feet in about 10 minutes. I will never forget the help given me.
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#14
At this point, I need to put in plenty of practice, after looking at some online instructional vids to ensure that I avoid practicing any bad habits...;)
 

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