archery -500 years

Bjorn

Active Member
#6
I would have liked to see the Irish/English outfits...and their bows.
This is what my son and I looked like when we taught archery at Rendezvous Fairs. We made our own bows and arrows for the events and we hunted with that equipment as well. My son made that longbow, he was 15 at the time. I am holding a sinew backed recurve that I made-both of those bows are osage. English archers in the 15-16 th century did not look like that but fun just the same-the women's Rendezvous outfits were even better!
Roper, seriously I can have you shooting that Montana well pretty easily if you are interested. Depending on where you are located most of it could be done over the 'net. PM me if you feel like it.
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Bjorn

Active Member
#7
The muskets that superseded the English longbow in the mid 1500's were terribly bad weapons-short range, unreliable and inaccurate. English archers in formation would shoot at targets 350 yards away, and the second arrow could follow the first seven seconds later, and the third arrow seven seconds after that-repeat. Muskets of the day had difficulty hitting a barn door at 80 yards-reloading an early musket probably took a fair bit of time too. But they won out because they required comparably little training and they were terrifying to the enemy because they were so loud.
Google 'Battle of Agincourt' if you want an idea of just how formidable English archers were in the day.
 

ribka

Active Member
#8
Read quite a bit on the battle of agincourt as a teen. That's what got me started, along with the writings of Fred Bear,Pearson and Saxton Pope, on building and shooting bows.
 

ribka

Active Member
#9
This is what my son and I looked like when we taught archery at Rendezvous Fairs. We made our own bows and arrows for the events and we hunted with that equipment as well. My son made that longbow, he was 15 at the time. I am holding a sinew backed recurve that I made-both of those bows are osage. English archers in the 15-16 th century did not look like that but fun just the same-the women's Rendezvous outfits were even better!
Roper, seriously I can have you shooting that Montana well pretty easily if you are interested. Depending on where you are located most of it could be done over the 'net. PM me if you feel like it.
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that is a great pic! I ve made a few osage flat bows on one long bow from vine maple and one yew long bow.

Impressed made a long bow from osage
 

Alex MacDonald

that's His Lordship, to you.....
#11
think about this: The average longbowman could put between 6 and 10 arrows in flight in a minute. The Black Prince had 7500 archers in his contingent at Agincourt (we know how many thanks to his payroll sheets). lop off 500 for illness and "whatever" and you get 7000 times 6 arrows/minute-being conservative-that's 42,000 arrows a minute....into which the French knights rode...have fun stormin` the castle, boys.....
 

Bjorn

Active Member
#12
think about this: The average longbowman could put between 6 and 10 arrows in flight in a minute. The Black Prince had 7500 archers in his contingent at Agincourt (we know how many thanks to his payroll sheets). lop off 500 for illness and "whatever" and you get 7000 times 6 arrows/minute-being conservative-that's 42,000 arrows a minute....into which the French knights rode...have fun stormin` the castle, boys.....
Maybe even more bizarre is how many fletchers were kept busy making arrows for all those guys!
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#13
This is what my son and I looked like when we taught archery at Rendezvous Fairs.
Great photo & nice-looking bows, Bjorn! Yours is a very similar design to my 60# bow crafted by a gent from Reflection Lake, WA. While I have never endeavored to make my own bow, this one is constructed from all WA state wood. Only one word comes close to describing it - Sweet.
 

Alex MacDonald

that's His Lordship, to you.....
#14
Watching a NOVA presentation last night on Neandertal habitations in northern Europe, one of the featured archeologists who's also a skilled flint knapper, had found a bunch of flakes that could only be small game arrowheads. He recreated them, tested them on a goat, and compared the fractures he got with his points to those his team had found, and concluded that the points were indeed arrowheads for relatively small game, as opposed to the large game of the time. Archeologically speaking, we have remains of bows and arrows that are pushing 5 thousand years old, but these points-based on strata artifacts and such, are 45-50 THOUSAND years old!!!!! and definitely NOT atlatl points, but arrows points. I had no idea that the practice of archery was that old. Amazing!!
 

Bjorn

Active Member
#15
The cave art at Lascaux sp? shows guys using bows 20,000 yrs ago and the Smithsonian ran an article suggesting killing with bows maybe 70,000 yrs ago. I have seen references suggesting 80,000 years ago too....................it is hard to find really old compelling evidence of anything complex, cave art only goes back so far and flint napping can be inconclusive too. Archeologists (and scientists) are also limited by their egos and having to conform to accepted ideas-Right?
The earliest arrow heads must have been fire hardened pointy sticks and who knows what they might have killed, or wounded-or when?
 

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