archery -500 years

Alex MacDonald

that's His Lordship, to you.....
#16
we do know what kind of game they took based on the marks on the bone left by flint knives and such-YUUUUGGGE critters:D. Pleistocene megafauna which, truth be told, I kinda wish there were a few examples still around. Megaloceros-the Irish elk comes to mind pretty quick. There's also extant examples of Clovis points embedded in mammoth bones. Must have taken some serious balls to hunt something like that!!!
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#17
There's also extant examples of Clovis points embedded in mammoth bones. Must have taken some serious balls to hunt something like that!!!
No sh!t! The technique supposedly involved running up underneath the monster and thrusting a spear between the ribs for a heart or lung shot. Presumably followed by a super hasty retreat from taking said shot.
 

Alex MacDonald

that's His Lordship, to you.....
#19
No sh!t! The technique supposedly involved running up underneath the monster and thrusting a spear between the ribs for a heart or lung shot. Presumably followed by a super hasty retreat from taking said shot.
As a scientist, and strictly in the interest of furthering the science of Paleoanthropology, one should ask....after spearing the mammoth, does one exit forward, to the sides, or out the back? And as a scientist, i'd postulate that the front would most likely have the highest risk. The sides would be second in risk factor, leaving the stern of the beast as the most viable. But in the rear, one has the risk of encountering "other" beastly defensive mechanisms. For example, what if, with your spear, you succeeded in scaring the living shit out of this ponderous plant-eating pachyderm. I must assume it takes a second or two to generate said shit response---just about the time our intrepid Neanderthal is "exiting, stage rear".......and as we all know, the rear of any beast is fraught with danger......
 

Bjorn

Active Member
#20
As a scientist, and strictly in the interest of furthering the science of Paleoanthropology, one should ask....after spearing the mammoth, does one exit forward, to the sides, or out the back? And as a scientist, i'd postulate that the front would most likely have the highest risk. The sides would be second in risk factor, leaving the stern of the beast as the most viable. But in the rear, one has the risk of encountering "other" beastly defensive mechanisms. For example, what if, with your spear, you succeeded in scaring the living shit out of this ponderous plant-eating pachyderm. I must assume it takes a second or two to generate said shit response---just about the time our intrepid Neanderthal is "exiting, stage rear".......and as we all know, the rear of any beast is fraught with danger......
Spoken like a true scientist, Alex! And not always did the giant flapjack land on it's top or bottom, sometimes when the mammoth was running fast the giant cow pie would land on it's side and then start rolling along standing up on end and this would make the Neanderthals scratch their heads and they'd go 'holy shit is that for real'? And pretty soon they were calling it 'wheel' and the rest is history-Yeah OK I did have a drink-maybe two.
 

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