Upper Gibbon River in Yellowstone to be poisoned to kill nonnative fish

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
WFF Supporter
I've fished the upper Gibbon. Nothing over 8" long, obviously stunted growth. The fish were fairly easy to catch, but maybe this will increase the size of the catch?

I also experienced one of my eeriest moments on the trail into the upper Gibbon. On my way out of Yellowstone and decided to stop at the trailhead and run up to a spot real quick to make a couple of casts. Sort of a good bye fish. I ran up the trail, made the casts and started running back out, maybe 15 minutes total. On the way out though, right in the middle of the trail, and I mean right smack dab in the middle of the trail, lay a giant pile of steaming fresh bear scat, and I do mean steaming. This was not black bear scat, this was grizzly scat and it was not there on the way in. The spot in the trail was fairly open, somewhat meadow like, and the tree line was open, no sign of a bear, but that did not stop the hairs on my bod from standing to attention all at once.

I walked briskly the rest of the way back to my car and drove the heck out of there. On the way out I talked to a park employee and told them about the encounter. At that time (maybe still are) the park asked patrons to share with them any bear sitings. They were happy for the information, mentioning that they hadn't heard about a bear in that area, but that it wouldn't be unheard of for a Grizzly to be there.
 

freestoneangler

Not to be confused with Freestone
We used potassium permanganate to descale metallic oxides... good to know it's safe for aquatic life. I guess if we start seeing descaled and extra bright finish fish downstream of the kill zone, we might know why.
 

longputt

Active Member
My son caught his first trout on a dry fly in this stream...he caught rainbow and brookies. All very small and dumb but what an experience for a young kid. The first trip had bear sightings in the area so I barely looked at the river....very relieved when we got back to the truck.

I'm not a Griz fan...too many uncomfortable experiences in AK.
 
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Jim Darden

Active Member
I've fished the upper Gibbon. Nothing over 8" long, obviously stunted growth. The fish were fairly easy to catch, but maybe this will increase the size of the catch?

I also experienced one of my eeriest moments on the trail into the upper Gibbon. On my way out of Yellowstone and decided to stop at the trailhead and run up to a spot real quick to make a couple of casts. Sort of a good bye fish. I ran up the trail, made the casts and started running back out, maybe 15 minutes total. On the way out though, right in the middle of the trail, and I mean right smack dab in the middle of the trail, lay a giant pile of steaming fresh bear scat, and I do mean steaming. This was not black bear scat, this was grizzly scat and it was not there on the way in. The spot in the trail was fairly open, somewhat meadow like, and the tree line was open, no sign of a bear, but that did not stop the hairs on my bod from standing to attention all at once.

I walked briskly the rest of the way back to my car and drove the heck out of there. On the way out I talked to a park employee and told them about the encounter. At that time (maybe still are) the park asked patrons to share with them any bear sitings. They were happy for the information, mentioning that they hadn't heard about a bear in that area, but that it wouldn't be unheard of for a Grizzly to be there.
It isn't really grizzly scat unless it contains the little bells........too bad to see them killing the grayling in grebe lake....they tried this eco engineering 55 years ago and it didn't go well.....bet you it returns to the current stat in a few years....
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
WFF Supporter
It isn't really grizzly scat unless it contains the little bells........too bad to see them killing the grayling in grebe lake....they tried this eco engineering 55 years ago and it didn't go well.....bet you it returns to the current stat in a few years....
How do you think I knew it was grizzly scat? As for the grayling in grebe, they were all mostly tiny anyway.
 

Dr. Jim

Member
The only native fish above Gibbon Falls is the mottled sculpin. They are going to stock Westslope cutthroat trout and grayling; neither are native to this section of the Gibbon River. Will they salvage any of the native mottled sculpins during this project?
 

Matt Paluch

Active Member
The only native fish above Gibbon Falls is the mottled sculpin. They are going to stock Westslope cutthroat trout and grayling; neither are native to this section of the Gibbon River. Will they salvage any of the native mottled sculpins during this project?
"After the action is complete, biologists will reintroduce native fish species to the upper Gibbon River drainage." From the YNP press release.
 

Dr. Jim

Member
"After the action is complete, biologists will reintroduce native fish species to the upper Gibbon River drainage." From the YNP press release.
As I've said, neither the Westslope cutts or grayling are native to these waters, only the mottled sculpin is native.
 

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