Looking for a hard to find chef knife

dld

Active Member
#16
Got to ask. What do you guys think of Cutco?
Never been a fan. They are high priced. I don't like the goofy handle. I had no idea what cutco was the first time I ran across them. I thought they looked like something you'd buy at Walmart--they just seemed cheap.

I appreciate that they are made in the US, but that is about it.

I generally like my knives made in Solingen or Seki City. I would love to find a US-made brand that I like and was competitive to the Messermeisters and Viking Elites I currently use.
 

Trapper

Author, Writer, Photographer
#17
I've had several different chef knives. I think knives are very personal and depending on what sort of cooking you do, you might very well choose something different than the next guy.

In 2017 I worked 140 days of cooking gigs, plus what I do at home. That's a lot of knife work and some of it is very varied from mincing garlic to deboning moose. No one knife could ever handle that range of work well.

FWIW: What I look for in a chef knife.



1. How it fits my hand. It's weight, balance, spine width and bolster design
2. The edge needs to be razor sharp and stay that way for long periods with a simple steel tune up
3. I choke up on my knives so the bolster has to fit where my thumb and opposing fingers normally hold the knife.
4. The spine width needs to be narrow for the knives I use for most work as it reduces friction.
5. The spine width needs to be wider for knives I use for deboning as I tend to use more side pressure
6. A paring knife with a Raven's beak is easier for what I do than a straight design

One thing people often remark about when they see me doing prep work is how I scrape the cutting board with the spine instead of the edge. Scraping the board with the edge just means I have to retune the edge. I don't sharpen or tune the spine of course.

Trapper
 

jersey

livin' the dream
#19
Found a local store and purchased a Japanese sharpening stone and another new knife.

Like Trapper, I prefer to choke up on my knives. This new knife is so sharp, there is no friction when cutting items. When cutting a carrot, there is no change in pressure needed from the initial cut through to when the knife hits the board. This thing is crazy sharp. Still not a do all and be all, but I've got a new chopper.

The stone has been fun retuning my other knives. It does take some time, but it's well worth it.
 

Trapper

Author, Writer, Photographer
#22
I know a lot of people who see these sort of knives as a waste of money. But its like a lot of other things including fly rods and reels.

Can I catch a trout on my 60 year old True Temper fiberglass rod that when you hold it out the tip deflects a good 12” downward and is a complete noodle? Can I palm my 60 year old Cortland reel that has no drag?

Of course.

But last summer when I was in Alaska catching 12-15 lb Silvers and crazy Arctic Char straight out of the salt, it was a lot less work and thus a lot more fun casting with a fast action 8 wt Sage and playing them off my Abel reel.

Trapper
 

Skip Enge

Active Member
Staff member
#23
I've had several different chef knives. I think knives are very personal and depending on what sort of cooking you do, you might very well choose something different than the next guy.

In 2017 I worked 140 days of cooking gigs, plus what I do at home. That's a lot of knife work and some of it is very varied from mincing garlic to deboning moose. No one knife could ever handle that range of work well.

FWIW: What I look for in a chef knife.



1. How it fits my hand. It's weight, balance, spine width and bolster design
2. The edge needs to be razor sharp and stay that way for long periods with a simple steel tune up
3. I choke up on my knives so the bolster has to fit where my thumb and opposing fingers normally hold the knife.
4. The spine width needs to be narrow for the knives I use for most work as it reduces friction.
5. The spine width needs to be wider for knives I use for deboning as I tend to use more side pressure
6. A paring knife with a Raven's beak is easier for what I do than a straight design

One thing people often remark about when they see me doing prep work is how I scrape the cutting board with the spine instead of the edge. Scraping the board with the edge just means I have to retune the edge. I don't sharpen or tune the spine of course.

Trapper
still love this perennial best buy...have a couple

https://www.surlatable.com/product/...3867&creative=9318703164&device=c&matchtype=e
 

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