Trip Report Report: Golden Trout in a Cascades high lake

#31
What an awesome trip, reminds me of a hike up to an alpine lake a couple years ago in which I was part of a volunteer project to count mountain goats for the state. I brought my 3 wt and once we made it to our destination I caught a single trout and put the rod away because I was so tired from the hike in myself.
 
#32
Sweet report, great pics.
I'm also late reading this and I just have to wonder why?
Why would WDFW spend all that $ to plant Golden trout in a place no one in their right mind would go to the effort to get there.
I'm not saying you are out of yer mind, cause in my younger days I did some crazy shit to fish places no one else would go.
Thank you for your effort
 

Troutnut

Active Member
#33
Why would WDFW spend all that $ to plant Golden trout in a place no one in their right mind would go to the effort to get there.
I read somewhere that a lot of the stocking is done by hi-lakers volunteers, although I have to guess this one was stocked by helicopter because I can't imagine how anyone would hike a bucket of fish up that mountain without spilling it.

As for the value, I'd say that even sitting here in my living room it makes me happier to know there are places like that out there. Any given lake might not be visited much, or at all, but collectively having a bunch of hard-to-access lakes with elusive fish provides a lot of people with real adventure and a lot more with dreams of adventure.
 
#34
So true.

I don't have to ever visit a wilderness area to appreciate the fact that it simply "exists".

What wild places we have left are precious, simply because of the fact that they are wild.
 
#36
I read somewhere that a lot of the stocking is done by hi-lakers volunteers, although I have to guess this one was stocked by helicopter because I can't imagine how anyone would hike a bucket of fish up that mountain without spilling it.

As for the value, I'd say that even sitting here in my living room it makes me happier to know there are places like that out there. Any given lake might not be visited much, or at all, but collectively having a bunch of hard-to-access lakes with elusive fish provides a lot of people with real adventure and a lot more with dreams of adventure.
I used to hike in to many back country lakes and in places that a person would never expect to find trout, (mostly brookies) because of the hi-laker volunteers.
I just can't get my mind around the cost to helicopter in those beautiful trout when so many other projects have been cut.
Yes I'm glad some adventurous souls might get in there to enjoy the wilderness, but it won't be me. I'll have to go to some other state if I want to catch a golden trout.
No more bush whacking for me
 
#37
DFW doesn't do any helicopter stocking any more. You are right that the Hi-Lakers do a lot of it, even in very out of the way lakes, but a few other fishing clubs around the state also provide volunteer effort to stock lakes. I've gone along a couple of times with friends in the H-L; it is a pretty slick operation. Fish are picked up at hatcheries very early in the a.m. and placed in ca. 5-gal collapsible plastic jugs with most of the air forced out. Then they fill the jug ca. half or more full with pure O2, so that the diffusion gradient into the water with the fish will stay high for the several hours needed to drive to the trailhead and hike to the destination lake. Once at the lake, the jug, with fish in it, is placed in the lake water until temperature of the water inside the jug has equilibrated with the lake water temperature, so that the release won't shock the fish. Fish are then released and the volunteer is expected to get a count on the number of floaters (dead fish). Both of the times I've gone along the count was zero!

Some of those guys are real gluttons for punishment; making the effort to get the fish to out of the way lakes, often with lots of elevation gain and no trail, in one day.
 

Dan Nelson

Hiker, Fisher, Writer, Bum
#38
DFW doesn't do any helicopter stocking any more. You are right that the Hi-Lakers do a lot of it,
I may be wrong, but I believe the Hi-Lakers are a fishing club. The volunteer fish stocking is done by the Trail Blazers (though a lot of membership cross-over).

https://www.watrailblazers.org/
"Formed in 1933, the Trail Blazers are a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to better alpine fishing. Trail Blazers act as volunteers for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to stock and survey mountain lakes. The club also volunteers for the Forest Service doing trail maintenance and other projects that meet the club's goals."

http://www.hilakers.org/about-the-hi-lakers/
"The Washington State Hi-Lakers is a membership organization that brings together people who enjoy high lake fishing and hiking. Regular Club activities include a monthly meeting, quarterly newsletter, and winter social. Hearing trip reports, finding fishing companions and learning about high lake issues are just some of the benefits of membership."
 

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