What length line?

Bjorn

Active Member
#1
I have a 13' 7 weight rod what is the minimum length line y'all are using for classic spey casting? I mean the line that is in front of your running line. I am being told it should be 50 feet or more and finding a line that long is not a simple task. What say y'all?
 

Tim Ihle

Active Member
#2
It sounds like you are new to Spey casting. If your looking for a line my suggestion to you is to call Poppy at the Red Shed and he will give you good advice on what line best matches your rod. If you do this you will avoid wasting a bunch of $ and the frustration of trying lines that don't work on your rod.

When you say "I mean the line that is in front of your running line" tells me that you are looking for a head, presumably a full floating head. It also tells me that you are a newbie and have not fine tuned your casting mechanics. If I'm correct , then it's fair to say you will struggle with a long head- anything over 40' will very likely give you fits! Do yourself a favor and call the Red shed, I imagine they will suggest a Scandi head approximately 30-35 feet maybe even a Rage head by Airflo.

Also, all lines will allow you to execute your "classic" Spey casting technique you so desparatly desire--you don't need a 50' line to join the club of classic Spey casters and to feel like you are employing "classic" casting. Pretty much the mechanics are all the same with lines of various lengths- it's just that long lines are more.....finicky and less forgiving to cast.

Then, after you have fine tuned your mechanics get your self an 18' wooden Greenheart Spey rod from the days of yor, hire some serenading bag pipes , buy some full dress flies,.....and have at it! It won't get more classic....

Good luck...and consider having someone teach you.

Ps- don't forget the Kilt! And wear it like a man...
 
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cmann886

Active Member
#3
I find lines of that length on a 13' rod difficult to manage. Nextcast Fall Favorite 45 and Rio AFS are about my limit on that particular rod length---others do not share my problem.

I've tried Ballisic Vector and a Galeforce 54' head. Using the Red Shed try before you buy program. (It is a fantastic program.

After several hours trying to adapt to a longer line I chose to stay with lines that are in the 36-45 foot range. The Galeforce laid out extremely well at the marked balance point, but I could never get the right timing down to cast the entire 54' using a single spey, or even circle spey. If you are bent on "Classic" full or even mid belly lines, I would go get lessons before buying the line for your rod. If you can swing a trip to Peck Idaho to and have poppy help you in person it would be well worth the trip.
 
#4
In traditional spey lines Rio makes a 'short' at 40 something, a 'mid' at 50 something, a 'long at 60 something. They used to make a full DT 120' and a Grand Spey at 70'. I personally use their 60' on a 13'6 Sage. I wouldn't recommend it for a novice. I learned using a Cortland DT, if you shot 10' ft. of line you were lucky, not running line mind you.
I think with a 13' rod and wanting some immediate success a 40 something head would be in order. I'd really like to say 50' but I don't know how long your willing to learn.
 

Jason Chadick

A Fish, A Fish, A Fishy, Oh...
#5
On my 13' 7wt my favorite line is an Airflo Delta 7/8. I believe the head is 52'. It's a really versatile line, especially when you cut it back to accommodate sinking tips. It handles the wind better than most mid-belly lines, I think the nextcast WA 55 might handle wind a tad better. But the airflo is a great line.

Basically in a 13' rod, I like lines between 44 and 55 feet, when I'm fishing the traditional stuff.
 

Jason Chadick

A Fish, A Fish, A Fishy, Oh...
#7
delta..often overlooked, but as classic as it gets!
In my opinion a totally underrated line! And for a couple years they made it in a shooting head which you can find online for cheap. I fish it year round, it's surprising how well it throws tips to about 130 grains (the 7/8 does at least).

Another line that I've grown really fond of this summer is the Beaulah Aerohead. It doesn't handle wind as well as the delta, but for touch and go casts it's a real thrill. Lots of distance, and tight loops. But I wouldn't fish weighted flies with it, and if the weather kicks up I find myself yearning for the delta.
 
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FT

Active Member
#8
There are a lot of what are known as "short-belly" spey lines available on the market and they are very easy to find. Short-belly spey lines have a belly (from tip to end of rear taper-i.e. ahead of the running line) of 50'-56'. The exception to this is the Nexcast (Winter Authority) WA 45, which is a head with no rear tape of 45' and is still a short-belly spey line. RIO, Airflow, Cortland, Scientific Angler, Gaelforce, Ballistic all make short-belly spey lines that are easy to find.

You're 13' 7wt rod would be balanced correctly with any of these short-belly lines in a 7/8 line weight.

I use mid-belly lines on my 13' rods. These have a belly of 60'-67' (or in the case of the Nextcast Winter Authority (WA) 55, a head with no rear taper of 55' or a little shorter.

As has been mentioned, casting a short-belly line takes more skill than casting a short, heavy Skagit line or a Scandi line. Anchor placement is critical with the traditional short-mid-long belly lines, as is good "D" Loop formation. But it is well worth the effort (and practice) the learn how to cast the longer, more traditional belly length lines.
 

Bjorn

Active Member
#9
Hey I really appreciate the help. I have been taking lessons and kinda' wanted to put what my instructor was telling me into context and this has been very helpful.:cool:
 

Bjorn

Active Member
#12
Airflo Scandi Long-600 gn worked best for me and my rod. The line is 45' long and casts very nicely-everything lands pretty much at the same time.
 

Bjorn

Active Member
#13
Airflo Scandi Long-600 gn worked best for me and my rod. The line is 45' long and casts very nicely-everything lands pretty much at the same time.
 

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