Oil Spill - How is this possible?

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#4
Yeah, but what about . . . ? Deflection, the classic approach for those who can't handle the subject at hand.

Oil spills are inevitable, whether the transport method is pipeline, rail, truck, or ship. Probability analysis indicates the inevitability. Assuming oil transport is in the public interest (why else would gov't. allow it, unless they're being bought off), what can be done is to reduce the frequency and magnitude of spills through mitigation measures. With a political administration like the current one, that believes such a thing as "clean coal" actually exists, fewer mitigation measures are required, so the reasonably expected outcomes are greater frequency of spills and spills of larger magnitude. That's how this is possible.
 

Bajema

Active Member
#5
ASME B31.4 (Code that governs this type of pipeline) requires radiographic testing of only 10% of welds. It does require a higher percentage in certain areas (near waterways, cities, etc.). Not saying a bad weld caused this, but it could be the failure mode. You also have instances like the Olympic pipeline explosion here in Bellingham where the pipe was damaged externally by a work crew.
 

freestoneangler

Not to be confused with Freestone
#6
Yeah, but what about . . . ? Deflection, the classic approach for those who can't handle the subject at hand.
Just as cherry picking what to rail about is the classic approach from those trying to push agendas. Swing, and another miss. Hopefully your fishing has been more successful.
 
#11
ASME B31.4 (Code that governs this type of pipeline) requires radiographic testing of only 10% of welds. It does require a higher percentage in certain areas (near waterways, cities, etc.). Not saying a bad weld caused this, but it could be the failure mode. You also have instances like the Olympic pipeline explosion here in Bellingham where the pipe was damaged externally by a work crew.
Interesting. What Dept. or who sets these codes?
 
#13
American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 49 CFR Part 195 also governs (put out by the DOT).

https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title49-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title49-vol3-part195.pdf

As a piping engineer, I’m curious to see what the source of the leak turns out to be.
I too am interested in the cause of the spill. I am always amused at how fast some in the media and government agencies want information and then get upset if the information changes as the investigation continues.

Anyone who has had to report to a government agency in short time periods knows how difficult this can be. The reality is the agency can do precious little about most reported conditions so knowing about the occurrence in 4 hours or in 24 hours makes no real difference in their ability to mitigate the condition. In this case the spill was reported as stopped in 15 minutes which is pretty good. (how long would it take you to shut off the water or gas in your house if the leak occurred at 5:00 a.m. and you had to first find a working flashlight?) How long would it take to to get an expert to your house to determine the cause of the leak after you had isolated the source?

As was previously posted, there is no such thing as zero risk of spills regardless of the transport mechanism. Spills will continue to happen either in the ocean or on the land (and potentially enter near-by water) along the transport route. Which do you think is easier to clean up?
 

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