Casting Basket Tangle

#1
Started using a basket on the beach this Fall and have a tough time getting "on reel" when I got a larger fish on, in close, and a bunch of line in the basket. The reel line is underneath all the other. Lost a Fatty trying to control the line and get "on reel" at the same time. End up with a birds nest..What am I doing wrong?
 
#2
Why does the fish need to be on the reel? If it's close, and hasn't earned the reel, then I don't see much point in forcing the issue.

Fish that need to be on the reel tend to end up that way one way or another on their own. If they are just gonna run at me and wallow around in the shallows I'd just take it to 'em and not worry about it.
 
#4
Ok. I would get on the reel quick to keep from stepping all over the line before using the basket. Just need a bit more experience..The basket has made casting a lot easier. I've been putting the rod in my armpit and using a two hand strip lately. Had a hard time getting the line in one handed even after trying various ways of positioning the basket. Ah, live and learn.
 

Bob Triggs

Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
#6
One good trick. After you lay out your line, make sure you have a foot or two of line hanging out of the side of the basket, before you begin stripping the fly. This will make it easier to reduce tangles when you are playing a fish, landing, casting, shooting line, etc. If you strip all of the line into the basket, with the line coming of the spool completely trapped under the pile of line, when you raise your casting hand to hook a fish, or make a cast, the line won't play out, it will often tangle.
 
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jasmillo

Active Member
#9
I cannot remember the last time an SRC was on my reel. Really not necessary in most cases. I think the last time was when I hooked up right after the cast.

I have had a lot of salmon on the reel this year - not all but a lot of them. I have only had one issue with a tangle causing an issue. I had to handline in a pretty decent coho. I use a basket similar to the one @VIUcutthroat describes. In the few other scenarios where small tangles occurred, they were easily shaken or pulled out as I was fighting the fish.

I have found that most tangles coming out of a stripping basket although annoying, especially to casting, are easy to untangle with one hand even while fight a fish with the other...
 
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gt

Active Member
#10
'on the reel' is a skill everyone who fly fishes should master. tangled line? stretch it before you start fishing. the line has a memory and unless you stretch that line each and every time, you are going to end up with a mess in your basket.
 

jasmillo

Active Member
#12
'on the reel' is a skill everyone who fly fishes should master. tangled line? stretch it before you start fishing. the line has a memory and unless you stretch that line each and every time, you are going to end up with a mess in your basket.
Not necessary in most cases for trout. If you try to get most trout you catch on the reel, your probably causing unneeded stress on the fish.
 
#13
Not necessary in most cases for trout. If you try to get most trout you catch on the reel, your probably causing unneeded stress on the fish.
While I totally agree this isn’t necessary for almost all trout (except the one in our dreams!), it is good to practise this firedrill prior to a decent coho or Chinook taking hold. If the fish is in close, just land it.
 

jasmillo

Active Member
#14
While I totally agree this isn’t necessary for almost all trout (except the one in our dreams!), it is good to practise this firedrill prior to a decent coho or Chinook taking hold. If the fish is in close, just land it.
Very true, good point.

Actually remembered one of my dumbest moments on the water from this year when rereading this thread. I hooked a coho this summer and did not have my reel completely secured because I had rinsed it after the previous trip. Had to handline that guy in too. Luckily he was on the smaller side.

The best part was a young kid fishing next to me on the beach laughing as I struggled to get the reel on the rod and then just give up and drop it in my basket. Little prick....but totally justified considering. We both had a laugh once I released the fish.
 
#15
I very seldom put a fish on the reel. Now, if they make a nice run, I will
try and recover some line, but I never bring them to the net on the reel - including the tackle busting chums.
I agree with Scott here. It took me a very long time to learn that I didn't have to get a fish on the reel. I lost way too many thinking it necessary. When a fish runs I'll let him put himself on the reel. If he comes at me I can strip much faster than I can reel up the slack being created.

I sold my stripping basket and now use a stripping tray called Flexi-Stripper. It's out of Denmark. I like it a lot better.
 

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