Article Pufferfish, Pufferfish, Pass

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#5
Puffer fish are interesting to catch. They eat your fly and then just... well... puff up. You can just drag them in at that point.
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
#10
Stoned dolphins, very interesting. I know that small strips of fugu (the Japanese preparation of pufferfish) are considered a delicacy, in part because of its neurological effects (loss of sensation) if the dosage is low. High doses are deadly and sashimi chefs who are legally allowed to prepare fugu undergo extensive training which culminates in them tasting their own preparation. In pufferfish, the liver and other internal organs have the highest dosages; obviously, there must be some toxin associated with the skin if the dolphins are to experience a response just from chewing on the outside of the body. This is similar to thrill-seeking humans who ingest fugu sashimi.

The toxin, tetradotoxin, is extremely dangerous, nastier than cyanide. It blocks sodium channels and sodium channels are critical for sending nerve signals along axons and contraction of skeletal muscles. If you ingest (or are injected with or inhale) a lethal dose, death is quick via respiratory failure. The diaphragm, the major muscle responsible for respiration, is paralyzed and one dies of asphyxiation

Tetratodoxin is found in a wide range of organisms, including pufferfishes (levels vary by species, season, and location), ocean sunfishes, rough-skinned newts [Our local Taricha granulosa secretes tetradotoxin from glands in its skin but common garter snakes have evolved resistance to the toxin], blue-ringed octopi, ribbon worms, and moon snails. None of these species make the tetradotoxin; several genera of bacteria, including Pseudomonas and Vibrio, are responsible for the synthesis. The defended animals either have symbiotic relationships with these bacteria or concentrate it from their environment. The defended animals appear to have evolved resistance, like the garter snakes, to the impacts of the toxin.

Steve
 
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mbowers

Active Member
#11
Stoned dolphins, very interesting. I know that small strips of fugu (the Japanese preparation of pufferfish) is considered a delicacy, in part because of its neurological effects (loss of sensation) if the dosage is low. High doses are deadly and sashimi chefs who are legally allowed to prepare fugu undergo extensive training which culminates in them tasting their own preparation. In pufferfish, the liver and other internal organs have the highest dosages; obviously, there must be some toxin associated with the skin if the dolphins are to experience a response just from chewing on the outside of the body. This is similar to thrill-seeking humans who ingest fugu sashimi.

The toxin, tetradotoxin, is extremely dangerous, nastier than cyanide. It blocks sodium channels and sodium channels are critical for sending nerve signals along axons and contraction of skeletal muscles. If you ingest (or are injected with or inhale) a lethal dose, death is quick via respiratory failure. The diaphragm, the major muscle responsible for respiration, is paralyzed and one dies of asphyxiation

Tetratodoxin is found in a wide range of organisms, including pufferfishes (levels vary by species, season, and location), ocean sunfishes, rough-skinned newts [Our local Taricha granulosa secretes tetradotoxin from glands in its skin but common garter snakes have evolved resistance to the toxin], blue-ringed octopi, ribbon worms, and moon snails. None of these species make the tetradotoxin; several genera of bacteria, including Pseudomonas and Vibrio, are responsible for the synthesis. The defended animals either have symbiotic relationships with these bacteria or concentrate it from their environment. The defended animals appear to have evolved resistance, like the garter snakes, to the impacts of the toxin.

Steve
We also have this saxitoxin in puffers in the next county north.

http://myfwc.com/fishing/saltwater/recreational/puffer-fish-prohibition/

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cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
#12
We also have this saxitoxin in puffers in the next county north.

http://myfwc.com/fishing/saltwater/recreational/puffer-fish-prohibition/

Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
Hi MB,
Yes, saxitoxin acts very similarly and is also synthesized by bacteria, either dinoflagellates or cyanobacteria. As you probably know, production of saxitoxin by dinoflagellates is responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) when they are concentrated in the tissues of filter-feeders by bivalves, like butter clams or razor clams, and these filter-feeders are consumed by predators, like us.
Steve
 
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mbowers

Active Member
#13
Hi MB,
Yes, saxitoxin acts very similarly and is also synthesized by bacteria, either dinoflagellates or cyanobacteria. As you probably know, production of saxitoxin by dinoflagellates is responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) when they are concentrated in the tissues of filter-feeders by bivalves, like butter clams or razor clams, and these filter-feeders are consumed by predators, like us.
Steve
Thanks for the extra details on saxitoxin.

Puffers were caught / gathered. They sleep on the sand at night so we just scooped them up in a net like picking up apples. Made up for the lack of flounder.

Fried in flour, egg and panko. Phenomenal!



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jwg

Active Member
#14
Those crazy dolphins....

“After chewing the puffer gently and passing it round, they began acting most peculiarly, hanging around with their noses at the surface as if fascinated by their own reflection.


http://www.independent.co.uk/enviro...refully-chewing-and-passing-them-9030126.html


Pretty amazing really.
Interesting. Many animals have figured out how to get intoxicated and deliberately seek out such opportunities.

I did not know dolphins knew how to trip on puffer fish!

j
 

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