Ideas for getting more Fish & Wildlife Officers

Would you donate money to pay for more WDFW officers?

  • Yes

    Votes: 18 52.9%
  • No

    Votes: 16 47.1%

  • Total voters
    34
#47
So I'm thinking about a fund that would not be in the government's control. In the early 20th century, the Audubon Society hired and paid for wardens to protect the new bird refuges. This may be a big undertaking, but I'm trying to see if we can do something similar to protect the fish from poachers.
Now that I like. You mean sportsmen actually having a say where resources are spent!! My lord it harkens back to the days of the Washington department of fish and game. I remember those times when the department was in the black and the rest of the state was jealous so they neutered them. I may change my vote if that's the direction. I like the people paying having a say about the spending. I know it's a strange concept but it works
 
#48
Oregon the state patrol and sheriff can bust game crime. It works. But then Washington couldn't pad their budget as much. What works for you doesn't work for Washington politicians. It's science.

Thanks for clearing that up. What a simple solution. And if not a total solution at teast it would of helped with very little effort
 

tallguy

Active Member
#49
Taxes. The answer is taxes. That is what pays for game wardens and other nice things in societies.

Otherwise known as "the price of civilization".

At least 80% of taxes will be used for shit you dont agree with at all or dont support. But other people do.

This is all perfectly OK. It has been this way for 2000+ years. It will be this way for the next 2000 years too.

To maintain your own sanity, the only thing that counts, laugh at the 80% of shit you dont support, and smile at the few percent of tax expenditure that are done perfectly, just as you hoped they be spent.

Then carry on with your day and life. Its just money.
 

tallguy

Active Member
#50
And remember, in our American democracy, we have precisely the government that we deserve.

This is actually the best we can do, together!
 

spadebit

Active Member
#51
They're stretched thin. I called non emergency 911 when I saw some guys fishing closed waters. It was on a holiday and they said most WDFW were off. I was told theyd give my comtact information to an officer but would see if State Patrol could stop by and check out the violators. Hours later a game warden called and said in a frustrated tone that he was the only warden on shift in 3 counties. No way hed be able to make it to check the area out due to other more pressing issues. Just made me realize how short handed they are. Besides their budget, I dont know how they can fill spots efficiently with their requirements and salary offered.
 

Kilchis

Active Member
#52
144 officers sounds like quite a few, but some adjustments need to be made to envision the actual number potentially working the field at any one time. Start with 144, then divide that among three shifts. Then make an adjustment for days off, sick time, and vacation earned. From the remaining number, adjust for time spent in court, preparing testimony, training, et al. What's left is damn few.
 
#53
144 officers sounds like quite a few, but some adjustments need to be made to envision the actual number potentially working the field at any one time. Start with 144, then divide that among three shifts. Then make an adjustment for days off, sick time, and vacation earned. From the remaining number, adjust for time spent in court, preparing testimony, training, et al. What's left is damn few.
Yet I see no less than a dozen to twenty law enforcement officers on a short trip from Aberdeen to Naselle. It's about priorities. Washington wants DUI and speeding tickets to generate revenue for stupid shit. They don't care about real crime or game crime. The answers are simple, look around. It's a priorities problem not a budget issue. These things are one percent about public safety and ninety nine percent about fleecing the public for money. Washington polices for profit. Washington sees corrections and policing as an industry.
 
Last edited:

kmudgn

Active Member
#54
There are several issues nationwide with increasing the number of officers:
1. A reduced number of people want to be cops-good economy, bad "image" of officers by public, and increased danger to the cops
2. A reduced number of people want an "outdoors" job today-think of the smaller percentage of people who want to be cops who also want to work a job like a warden, conservation officer (CO), or F&G Police
3. Being a F&G/Warder/CO is a "hard" job with many organizations requiring extra PT type tests to qualify
4. Funding is limited in many states as this type of job is usually an "afterthought" for politicians
 

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