Attn. All Nymphers: SLOW DOWN

That's just it it's not an effective method. Not when compared to using the right gear for that presentation.

Though i never really indicator fished for steelhead i gave up nymph fishing for them because it was too easy.

I'd argue that in certain conditions a bobber and bead on a fly rod with a good person on the sticks of a good drift boat can be the most effective method. Think high pressure river late fall with low clear water.
 
That's just it it's not an effective method. Not when compared to using the right gear for that presentation.
.
And yet none of you will accept Ira's challenge and prove to us all that gear rods are a better tool for the type of fishing were discussing.

BTW Dustin Bise was spot on with his question, which you so skillfully dodged. Ya you throw 1/2 ounce of lead in the mix and a gear rod is king no doubt. But we're not talking about 1/2 ounce and neither was Dustin when he asked about a single bead, tiny split shot, and a small indicator. Answer the question for once Rob, how far can YOU cast that rig with a spinning rod?? Not how far can you cast a slinky or 1/2 ounce of lead.... How far can you cast the outfits actually being discussed in this thread.

Please please please someone take Ira up on his challenge and prove us wrong once and for all.
 
I find it disturbing guys like Charles won't open their minds and hearts. I bet you are against the third bathroom designation too. Bastards.

I once knew a guy who insisted on calling winter steelhead he caught under an indicator "dry line" steelhead. I didn't argue.
 

quilbilly

Big Time Hater
I once knew a guy who wanted to nymph out of my boat.....I said no, and he got all kinds of bent out of shape about it.
I tried to explain that we were doing a long float, and to hit the good swing water we would be hauling ads to each spot, taking our time swinging, and then go to the next spot.
He just fukin wouldn't shut up about some guide he knew from Montana who nymphed all the time.

Finally I found a nymph spot, kicked his ass out and said, go ahead nymph here.

I rowed a bit back upstream, dropped anchor and watched for a while, then noticed a fish roll below the boat about 20 feet, the number was 100 feet or so below me, so I grabbed my rod, roll cast about 20 feet of line out and half heartedly let it hang in the current for a while...like 2 minutes.

13 pound chrome hen......

He was not pleased.

Closest I've come to nymphing.
 

Charles Sullivan

ignoring Rob Allen and Generic
I find it disturbing guys like Charles won't open their minds and hearts. I bet you are against the third bathroom designation too. Bastards.

I once knew a guy who insisted on calling winter steelhead he caught under an indicator "dry line" steelhead. I didn't argue.
I'm a 1 bathroom guy. Just label it bathroom or people room and move on.

I'm not a bastard. If you ever met my parents that would be clear.

I believe my heart and mind are open. I'll be damned if I'm going to listen to any cockamamie argument that using a bobber on your flyrod is fly-fishing. It's a god damned bobber.

Bobber.

Go sox,
Cds
 
Of course most people know that I don't fish for steelhead at all anymore. Personally I think they are the most overrated fish on the planet. The steelhead marketing team has done a hell of a great job painting this picture that these fish are some mythical creature that requires an enormous amount of skill to catch. Horse shit. They require very little skill to catch. The true skill is FINDING steelhead, at which point it really doesn't matter what method you choose to fish for them,
Nick, I see your point, however, I disagree. Any fish which we target whether salt or freshwater has vulnerability at certain times and situations to angling. I agree that steelhead are not difficult to fool, on average....Where I disagree is that steelhead are not actively feeding, their environment in freshwater is constantly changing, and they are migratory. These changing conditions reflect how often we are successful. We have all fished over hundreds of steelhead which were dour, had them
travel by us without giving a shit about our offering. Not an easy target. Flip side, a freshly arrived steelhead takes up temporary residence in your favorite drift, he is resting and anticipating moving soon...game over, fish on. Bottom line is they don't bite all the time, but often enough for the guys that understand them to make it easy.

The part I really don't agree with you on is skill needed. Put a fish in a deep, fast, boulder strewn tailout, 60' out.....u game? How about picking your way through canyon water and dealing with hydraulics? Pocket water? Log jams? That clay bank ledge with fish suspended? Everybody can pull steel out of walking speed, 5-6' riffles....... I know you probably posses skills to catch them in all conditions and situations, but for 95% of dudes.....not happening.PERIOD. We take for granite the skills it takes to be consistent. To me the steelhead is king, for challenging my casting, presentations, color selection, and conditions, etc..?
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
I'm a 1 bathroom guy. Just label it bathroom or people room and move on.

I'm not a bastard. If you ever met my parents that would be clear.

I believe my heart and mind are open. I'll be damned if I'm going to listen to any cockamamie argument that using a bobber on your flyrod is fly-fishing. It's a god damned bobber.

Bobber.

Go sox,
Cds
Denier

Yet they are literally called different things by people; if I placed a red and white bobber in front of you, a steelhead float, a Chernobyl, and a strike indicator, I imagine you would call them all bobbers. Call it a bobber if you like, doesn't mean you are correct.

Denier
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
Nick, I see your point, however, I disagree. Any fish which we target whether salt or freshwater has vulnerability at certain times and situations to angling. I agree that steelhead are not difficult to fool, on average....Where I disagree is that steelhead are not actively feeding, their environment in freshwater is constantly changing, and they are migratory. These changing conditions reflect how often we are successful. We have all fished over hundreds of steelhead which were dour, had them
travel by us without giving a shit about our offering. Not an easy target. Flip side, a freshly arrived steelhead takes up temporary residence in your favorite drift, he is resting and anticipating moving soon...game over, fish on. Bottom line is they don't bite all the time, but often enough for the guys that understand them to make it easy.

The part I really don't agree with you on is skill needed. Put a fish in a deep, fast, boulder strewn tailout, 60' out.....u game? How about picking your way through canyon water and dealing with hydraulics? Pocket water? Log jams? That clay bank ledge with fish suspended? Everybody can pull steel out of walking speed, 5-6' riffles....... I know you probably posses skills to catch them in all conditions and situations, but for 95% of dudes.....not happening.PERIOD. We take for granite the skills it takes to be consistent. To me the steelhead is king, for challenging my casting, presentations, color selection, and conditions, etc..?
Sounds like many trout situations. Have you tried carp?
 

Gyrfalcon2015

Wild Trout forever
Nick, I see your point, however, I disagree. Any fish which we target whether salt or freshwater has vulnerability at certain times and situations to angling. I agree that steelhead are not difficult to fool, on average....Where I disagree is that steelhead are not actively feeding, their environment in freshwater is constantly changing, and they are migratory. These changing conditions reflect how often we are successful. We have all fished over hundreds of steelhead which were dour, had them
travel by us without giving a shit about our offering. Not an easy target. Flip side, a freshly arrived steelhead takes up temporary residence in your favorite drift, he is resting and anticipating moving soon...game over, fish on. Bottom line is they don't bite all the time, but often enough for the guys that understand them to make it easy.

The part I really don't agree with you on is skill needed. Put a fish in a deep, fast, boulder strewn tailout, 60' out.....u game? How about picking your way through canyon water and dealing with hydraulics? Pocket water? Log jams? That clay bank ledge with fish suspended? Everybody can pull steel out of walking speed, 5-6' riffles....... I know you probably posses skills to catch them in all conditions and situations, but for 95% of dudes.....not happening.PERIOD. We take for granite the skills it takes to be consistent. To me the steelhead is king, for challenging my casting, presentations, color selection, and conditions, etc..?
Good stuff, JACKspASS.
A prime freshwater Steelhead is the most beautiful fish that swims in coastal river waters, bar none, IMHO. They have just a different feel than salmon.
 
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Sounds like many trout situations. Have you tried carp?
Very similar to trout situations. I love catching trout, along with their bigger chrome brothers. I just don't target the searun variety as much anymore.

There is a backwater to a large river 30 miles from my house which has Carp..... Is it worth it?

So what should I hang under my indicator for them?
 

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