More winning for Big Oil

FinLuver

Active Member
I don't even know how to respond to this. You are too far gone.



This tells me you are operating within your own reality. Anyone who has been in construction over the last decade would read this comment and scratch their head. Ask me how I know...
Were you one of those kids, on the playground, who picked his scabs and ate 'em?
No...don't answer that. (we already know the answer)

Clearly however, your comprehension skills are lacking, as no where have I said anything about how great the Obama era was; quite the contrary as a matter of fact. Also clear, is that you don't live anywhere near my neck of the woods; therefore, you have no comprehension of the turn around in the construction and manufacturing in the area. Nor do you have a clue as to the upturn for businesses associated within the industry I work in.

What is clear...

No matter how many times you pick at it, my experience is just that...my experience. It's also in the history books of time, so to speak. Nothing you or anybody does or says can change it. There's no statues to burn...there's no books to re-write...there's no twists to the story you can exploit.

What isn't clear...

Your own experience...and not what the fake news tries to tell the masses, it is.

Please share with the classroom your "own personal" experience. There's no wrong answer...you'll not be picked at for your answers.

You have an attentive audience.

Yard Sale...feel free to share as well.
(and to answer your question...I also deal with the public sector...their spending has blossomed this year as well)
 
Last edited:

The T.O. Show

Buenos Hatches Ese
Were you one of those kids, on the playground, who picked his scabs and ate 'em?
No...don't answer that. (we already know the answer)
Fucking gross, what?????

You keep saying you "deal" with these industries which is a clear giveaway that you don't actually specialize or work in any of this shit. You clearly are not in construction anywhere in the United States if you think this just started to pick up in the last year, plain and simple. Again, ask me how I know because I'm happy to tell you.
 

FinLuver

Active Member
Fucking gross, what?????

You keep saying you "deal" with these industries which is a clear giveaway that you don't actually specialize or work in any of this shit. You clearly are not in construction anywhere in the United States if you think this just started to pick up in the last year, plain and simple. Again, ask me how I know because I'm happy to tell you.
I did just that...you have the floor.
 

The T.O. Show

Buenos Hatches Ese
I did just that...you have the floor.
Commercial project management for the last decade. Fresh out of school when the economy was in the tank and no one could get a job including myself. I've watched this industry transform from literally nothing, every contractor and developer laying people off, architects and designers going out of business, manufacturers reps closing their doors (I worked for one and left before the ship sank)... I didn't make dick when I started in this industry. I would have been better off being a fly fishing guide because at least there aren't that many people who can row a boat. Now, I can't find good people because this market is absolutely tapped out. We are bidding and building more shit than you could ever imagine (not if you actually worked in the industry). And guess what, it's been that way for at least 3 years, probably 4. I remember the buzz around this in 2014 when they started running the data and figured out we were building more in the PNW than anywhere in the world outside of Dubai. This isn't a new phenomenon. I understand that it varies by area but it hasn't skipped that many places. Everywhere on the west coast has been like that, and unless you live in Mississippi or somewhere with no economy then the construction industry has been off the charts. And that isn't just commercial. My family has made their living off of residential real estate and property management in rural areas ever since I was a wee lad.... If you didn't catch it until January 20th 2017 then that's your fault, not the economy's.
 
Last edited:

Rob Allen

Active Member
SALT deductions were important. So is trying to reduce student debt. Unfortunately the current administration is going the other way.

We took Avery serious look at solar panels. Unfortunately our roof will need replacing soon so it didn’t pencil out. When our roof goes bad in a few years I’m hoping we can then make the move but without the deductions it won’t work.

Bottom line is we need to invest in our power grid. We need better transmission lines. We need more alternatives energy sources. We need to shut down coal in favor of NG. We need to regulate energy efficiency in the home, transit, and work place.

There is no silver bullet. Like Dr Marvin said; baby steps. Unfortunately we seem to be moonwalking purely out of spite of the last admin simply to appease a tiny base group. 2018 mid terms can’t happen soon enough.
I am more for the simplification of the tax code. Eliminate deductions and lower the rates at which people are taxed. We shouldn't be trying to shape peoples behavior, they need to be free to make thoes decisions themselves.
Student debt: i think there are multiple issues here. Costs of school, study choices of students, and personal responsibility and many others. I don't believe paying for peoples college is a good idea at all.
I know too many people choosing useless degrees then wondering where all the good jobs are. Too many people following their desires into fields in which there is no opportunity, no way in hell should anyone pay their student debt for them by force. There are many fields that are in desperate need of people and pay well that no one wants to do. You have to follow opportunity not your desires.

As for regulating energy efficiency in homes.. nope. People need to be free to make thoes decisions themselves.

I agree with working on the electrical infrastructure and that is what government should be spending it's money on. It makes us better prepared for the future and puts people to work.
 

weiliwen

Active Member
Dunno sounds like a bad idea.. same with lumber.. never sell off your natural resources to another country.
On that, I'll agree. At least export completely processed goods, keeping those jobs in the country.

Take a look at the Port of Longview, and all the raw logs exported for others to mill. They skin them and call that "processed," but that's just a loophole - that's a raw resource being exported to where it's cheaper to process. If we are going to export lumber, at least make it finished lumber.
 

freestoneangler

Not to be confused with Freestone
Solar still works when it's cloudy. And the naysayers need to do some homework.
Stupid ass statements keep spilling from the forums Jester. Meanwhile the technologies Achilles heel has been been outed and continues to be skirted by the proponents stone drunk on fantasy punch.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
On that, I'll agree. At least export completely processed goods, keeping those jobs in the country.

Take a look at the Port of Longview, and all the raw logs exported for others to mill. They skin them and call that "processed," but that's just a loophole - that's a raw resource being exported to where it's cheaper to process. If we are going to export lumber, at least make it finished lumber.
That's bugged me for a long time.
We are doing it with coal too.
Selling raw natural resources is about the worst trade policy a country can have.
 

FinLuver

Active Member
Commercial project management for the last decade. Fresh out of school when the economy was in the tank and no one could get a job including myself. I've watched this industry transform from literally nothing, every contractor and developer laying people off, architects and designers going out of business, manufacturers reps closing their doors (I worked for one and left before the ship sank)... I didn't make dick when I started in this industry. I would have been better off being a fly fishing guide because at least there aren't that many people who can row a boat. Now, I can't find good people because this market is absolutely tapped out. We are bidding and building more shit than you could ever imagine (not if you actually worked in the industry). And guess what, it's been that way for at least 3 years, probably 4. I remember the buzz around this in 2014 when they started running the data and figured out we were building more in the PNW than anywhere in the world outside of Dubai. This isn't a new phenomenon. I understand that it varies by area but it hasn't skipped that many places. Everywhere on the west coast has been like that, and unless you live in Mississippi or somewhere with no economy then the construction industry has been off the charts. And that isn't just commercial. My family has made their living off of residential real estate and property management in rural areas ever since I was a wee lad.... If you didn't catch it until January 20th 2017 then that's your fault, not the economy's.
Thank you for sharing. As you mentioned, it varies from area to area...sometimes it just takes a bit longer for it (the economy) to hit its stride...it certainly did in my neck of the woods. And if you'll recall, the discussion was about Obama's effect on the economy, while in office, versus the first year of Trump's tenure; not, catching this or that. And, there is no fault or blame to be handed around. I made comments from my experience, just as you have from yours...it wasn't until Obama left office, that things started to pickup. Coincidence? Maybe. However, my suppliers and some of my customers are national and global players. Their stories are very similar in certain areas of the country and sectors of their businesses.

[I'm not sure why it was so hard for a civil answer to be had in the first place.]

PS:...I too worked as a multi-product line manufacturer's rep, out of the Bellevue area. It was a multi-state gig, with reps along the west coast+, during the big box hardware stores expansions between 2001-2008. It sounds like the guy who hired me then, and you have followed similar career paths. Towards the latter part of the gig, we could see business sliding south. Now, I do B2B sales in the public and private sector, for the industries outlined earlier. [Not that it matters much] I also have a cousin who is and has been quite busy (at times) as a commercial project manager for well past 15+ years; but, it took him moving 200+ miles away to find the steady work...work he loves to do.
 
Last edited:

FinLuver

Active Member
On that, I'll agree. At least export completely processed goods, keeping those jobs in the country.

Take a look at the Port of Longview, and all the raw logs exported for others to mill. They skin them and call that "processed," but that's just a loophole - that's a raw resource being exported to where it's cheaper to process. If we are going to export lumber, at least make it finished lumber.
Not to forget, that "processed" logs go for big bucks overseas. It's worth more, hittin' a ship, than if it was processed here for big timber.
 
Last edited:

FinLuver

Active Member
Drill baby drill! Cleanup baby cleanup!
Sounds like a nice economic stimulus and jobs creation package...;)

I thought this an interesting perspective...

"Liberals here in the northwest happily put on coats and hats and gloves made from oil, climb into their Subaru’s fueled with oil and gas, and take their kayaks made from oil out to protest against drilling for oil. Go figure. Expect to see a lot of those sustainability hypocrites after the Trump administration announced new oil leases off the coast of Oregon and Washington. They can use oil and natural gas every day to keep their lives comfortable...and yet protest actual drilling to get that oil and gas out of the ground. The last time the federal government leased land off the pacific northwest coast for drilling was half a century ago...and they found evidence there’s oil out there. But the so-called environmentalists...whose heroes jet around the planet in fossil fueled jets...don’t want it in their backyard. But before they turn you off to oil drilling here in the northwest with scare tactics, consider two things. We have thousands of oil platforms in the Gulf of Mexico and with an admirable safety record an occasional big accident or two. And second...look up “fishing the rigs” and you’ll find that drill rigs and oil platforms are potent breeding grounds for fish." – Lars Larson


It's OK...except, not in my backyard. ;)
 
Last edited:

Rob Allen

Active Member
Here's a little information for the dinosaurs on the forum:

http://www.directenergysolar.com/blog/will-my-solar-panels-work-when-its-cloudy-or-rainy/
  • The undisputed leader, Germany is able to cover 50% of its electricity needs using nothing but solar energy.
  • Not far behind is the United Kingdom—a country with notoriously overcast skies. And yet, the UK has enjoyed tremendous success with its solar initiatives.
And they can afford to invest in all that because the USA provides their defence and medical research.
 

Latest posts