The one yard line

Im going to estimate that your little group of fish conservationists is going to go by the way side very soon. Because it has little to do with actual wild fish conservation through a large angler base. Yes, that includes the plug pullers, the plunkers, the side drifters every method that falls into the legal means of fishing these rivers. Thats a much larger base then you want to comprehend but it all has to be taken into consideration.
Brian, lots to digest and debate in your comments, but if we happen to cross paths on the river I'll happily show you my gear bag. You'll find just as many WFO worms and 50-50 spoons as spey flies.

Other than a certain Duvall-based litigation factory, Washington's wild fish conservation orgs are far from fly purists. I agree we need to do a much better job of rebuilding our base and presenting an inclusive and collaborative brand. Did you catch Wild Steelhead Coalition's Steelhead Country campaign and video series? It was one small step towards doing so.
 
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The subject of accurate spawning escapement estimates gets mentioned from time to time, so I thought I'd pick that part out of your post and respond to it. The answer is that escapement estimates are not a count, they are not accurate, but they are precise. I say precise because the method used to make the estimate provides a point estimate (with a substantial confidence interval), and it is systematic from year to year. That point estimate is really an index value. It's accuracy doesn't matter very much. What does matter is the relationship (whatever it is) between the index value and the real, but unknown, value. An underlying assumption in the fairly simple spawning escapement estimation model is that the relationship between the index value and the real actual value is the same, or about the same from year to year.

So long as that underlying assumption is valid, the index value for escapement, which is an estimate, and the actual or estimated number of fish harvested (or assumed mortality for CNR recreational fishing) are accurate enough to satisfy conservation and harvest management goals. I'm not certain, but I think many or most of the world's fisheries are managed using lower quality data that is used to manage Skagit steelhead. Maybe that's not saying much for fish management, but it can add some perspective about how accurate or risky Skagit steelhead management is.

Sg
Sg, I do appreciate your reply and it does shed some light on a topic I have never fully understood which is how do you project a spawning escapement for rivers like the Sauk or Skagit. Where do the numbers come from? When you hear 9,000 fish returned and you wonder just how accurate that estimate is. It could be higher or lower. The word assumption isnt an easy one for me to get my head around in reguards to data but I also understand its not perfect science when it comes to a species that spends the majority of its time swimming in the pacific ocean.
 
Brian, lots to digest and debate in your comments, but if we happen to cross paths on the river I'll happily show you my gear bag. You'll find just as many WFO worms and 50-50 spoons as spey flies.

Other than a certain Duvall-based litigation factory, Washington's wild fish conservation orgs are far from fly purists. I agree we need to do a much better job of rebuilding our base and presenting an inclusive and collaborative brand. Did you catch Wild Steelhead Coalition's Steelhead Country campaign and video series? It was one small step towards doing so.
Chase, I did not check out the Steelhead Country campaign. I will definetly give it a look. My issue is and will always be the short sided approach of user groups wanting it there way or nothing. There is no place in the world today for that ideology or thought process. It doesnt work especially when it comes to a particular species and our assumed best method of protecting it. Strength is in getting all user groups involved and having a stake in the proposed fishing seasons.

Clearly you will agree that keeping the rivers closed is a really bad choice when it comes to steelhead management? You get that with out eyes on the river its pretty much the fucking wild west out there? Did you fish these rivers when the catch and release season existed?

If you did then we would not be having this conversation. We possibly might be having a beer around a camp fire at Howard Miller park. Hopefully that will happen. I appreciate your response and I will always keep an open mind.
 

smc

Active Member
“Conclusion A proposal to conduct directed harvest of an ESA-listed Puget Sound steelhead population, whether lethal tribal or recreational catch and release (C&S), is undeniably controversial.“

To conflate a directed lethal harvest with catch and release is undeniably controversial.

and... I thought C&S was a sugar company.
 
During the recent training of the techs that will be on the river, many poachers have been spotted and ticketed.
This is like a Raymond Carver sentence. It is laden with information and meaning. While I’m happy that techs are being trained, I’m disappointed to hear of “many poachers.” Thanks for the update.
 

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