Geezus...Now It's Squirrels!!!

Old406Kid

Active Member
#1
So I sit down in my chair this evening and hear this sound. At first I think it's the dog chewing a Nylabone on the wood floor behind my chair but when I look the dog is across the room from the sound.
I go outside with a flashlight and see a squirrel that has chewed through or knocked a screen out of a birdblock vent hole and is now chewing from the inside to enlarge the hole.

I planned on leaving tomorrow afternoon for a month so looking for quick and effective solutions.
Any and all suggestions appreciated.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#4
Lure it out with bait & shoot it (if possible.). Or fashion a 1-way door out of reinforced, HEAVY MESH hardware cloth, so when it exits it can't get back in. I did this 2 years ago to evict a Rockchuck that took-up residence under my storage barn. I used heavy hardware cloth reinforced with weld rod to maintain rigidity. I propped mine open & set a trip wire since it was at ground-level, but the squirrel should be able to push such a door open to exit; if the door is appropriately sized, re-entry should be impeded (maybe weight the door at the bottom). If you see it trying to get back in, you should have a good opportunity to introduce it to a pellet at that time.I used screw eyes as hinges. I made a bunch of racket to run the rodent out of the space. Good luck, Dean.

I also have a kill trap I'd be glad to loan you & it is effective. You can also soup-up a rat trap by placing shims under the tail springs to provide more forceful & quicker closing if you can get to the area (there are videos on-line.). Or, I'd be glad to drive-up with a highly-accurate & very quiet squirrel remover if shooting at your place is feasible/legal.

Good luck. Squirrels & I are NOT friends:D. Let me know; I used to be with the government and I'm still here to help.
 

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weiliwen

Active Member
#5
I hate squirrels - they've chewed through my soffit a couple times; we had bad flooding in July and my house was an island (although not flooded itself) for two weeks. Since then, the squirrels are way fewer. I agree fully on the hardware cloth - it's the only way to keep them out until you replace the chewed-up portion.

After I shoot a squirrel with my pellet gun, I cut off the tail and take a hair trimmer I have and shave the little bastard; where I live, the Pink Squirrel is the go-to fly, so I tie up dozens of those. I'm also going to start tying the Jensen's Hackle Hair Streamer that ScottP put up an SBS for recently; it uses squirrel tail.
 

Old406Kid

Active Member
#6
Thanks @Jim Ficklin and @weiliwen,
I'll be sighting in the pellet rifle this morning and hope he's out sunning himself some time today.
Nothing is open on Sunday for materials here unless I drive 1/12 hours but I'll gather up what I need tomorrow to build a trap.
It's hard to see in this picture but the blocks between each rafter have holes with wire screen stapled behind them for ventilation. Evidently he was able to knock one loose or chew or scratch through it.
IMG_1281.jpg

This is the garage but the house has 3 holes in each block so now that it knows the drill this game could go on indefinitely unless it's gone permanently. Also it could well be a pregnant female which could really add to the situation.
 
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Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#7
You could also make a snare from soft, woven picture-hanging wire. Twist a small loop in one end, feed the other end through the loop to form the snare; attach the tail end to the house (nail/screw-eye?) & position the snare in front of the hole ("stick" it to the wall with a couple dabs of plumbers putty). The soft wire tangles in the squirrel's hair when it cinches-down & permanently ends the problem that squirrel is causing. The pest comes out & never goes anywhere else again (well, maybe the tail goes into your tying inventory & the carcass into the ground/trash.). Then I'd be covering those vent holes with hardware cloth.

Set a bait pile out in a good location & zero at that range this morning. I can be there in 2 hours if you need a hand.
 

Old406Kid

Active Member
#8
This is what I'm thinking for a one way trap but the roof pitch is a 10/12, around 40 degrees, so gravity is against me unless I can weight the door enough or somehow design it so the door ends up closer to level.
I'm also going to get a rat trap to bait and set while I'm fabricating.

A huntin' I'll go.
hunting-clipart-elmer-fudd-1.jpg
 

Old406Kid

Active Member
#9
You could also make a snare from soft, woven picture-hanging wire. Twist a small loop in one end, feed the other end through the loop to form the snare; attach the tail end to the house (nail/screw-eye?) & position the snare in front of the hole ("stick" it to the wall with a couple dabs of plumbers putty). The soft wire tangles in the squirrel's hair when it cinches-down & permanently ends the problem that squirrel is causing. The pest comes out & never goes anywhere else again (well, maybe the tail goes into your tying inventory & the carcass into the ground/trash.). Then I'd be covering those vent holes with hardware cloth.

Set a bait pile out in a good location & zero at that range this morning. I can be there in 2 hours if you need a hand.
The snare sound like a good idea!
Are you by any chance related to Bill Murray?;)
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#10
Are you by any chance related to Bill Murray?;)
Nope, but I have done my share of trapping. I always carried a few snares in my emergency hunting pack - they provided more than a few Cottontails & Snowshoes for dinner. I have also been at war with Fox Squirrels for many years. Hank has accounted for a dozen or so; I'm leading the pack however. One air rifle is always kept zeroed at minute-of-squirrel at bait-pile range:cool:.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#12
I wouldn't do that much fabrication. Put a temporary wooden ledge below the hole, stake a baited & souped-up rat trap on the ledge. Attach a wire lanyard from the trap to the ledge. You could drive a couple nails up through the bottom of the rat trap to increase lethality (but also add mess, lol.).

When the Chuck got under my barn & I couldn't get it out (tried squirting it, poking it, tried live trapping to no avail & didn't want to shoot it under there) - I turned it into a fun game. That beats hob out of being pissed & frustrated. I decided to find out if I was smarter than a rodent; turns out I am.

I had a mouse in an interior wall one time - the refrigerator receptacle cover plate had cracked leaving an access hole at one corner - the mouse had climbed-up the low-hanging cord. I baited the thing near the base of the cord for a day or two, then placed the same bait on a glue trap. Finis. Replaced the cover with a more durable one.
 

Old406Kid

Active Member
#13
I wouldn't do that much fabrication. Put a temporary wooden ledge below the hole, stake a baited & souped-up rat trap on the ledge. Attach a wire lanyard from the trap to the ledge. You could drive a couple nails up through the bottom of the rat trap to increase lethality (but also add mess, lol.).

When the Chuck got under my barn & I couldn't get it out (tried squirting it, poking it, tried live trapping to no avail & didn't want to shoot it under there) - I turned it into a fun game. That beats hob out of being pissed & frustrated. I decided to find out if I was smarter than a rodent; turns out I am.

I had a mouse in an interior wall one time - the refrigerator receptacle cover plate had cracked leaving an access hole at one corner - the mouse had climbed-up the low-hanging cord. I baited the thing near the base of the cord for a day or two, then placed the same bait on a glue trap. Finis. Replaced the cover with a more durable one.
Hence the title of my post. I just got done trapping 13 mice out of my basement in Spokane after some sealant dried up around the A/C lineset. We've lived there 15 years and never had even one before.
I'm developing a strong dislike for rodentiae at this point.:D
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#14
Best mouser I ever had was a 9# Jack Russell Terrier - death on mice. Sadie even cleaned them out of the yard. I never saw another mouse until 3 years after she died. They incurred a sudden demise also.
 

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