New Puget Sound Chinook Resource Management Plan

#76
Maybe the commission wanted it to go this way. They get someone to do their dirty deeds for them and they get to say “we didn’t even know this was going on!” This whole deal is moving me to be an open advocate for poaching.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater
#77
Maybe the commission wanted it to go this way. They get someone to do their dirty deeds for them and they get to say “we didn’t even know this was going on!” This whole deal is moving me to be an open advocate for poaching.
I personally don’t think that is the case.
For the amount of time the commission puts in and what that are compensated for, I just don’t see it.
This is on WDFW staff selling the state’s sportpeople down the road.
If you haven’t done so already, please continue to call, write and email the commission, Director Unsworth, Gov Inslee and your representatives and tell them this plan is a POS.
SF
 

Smalma

Active Member
#78
If interested the audio of the agency presentation to the commission (was available via phone conference for those that signed up early) and the material (power point) provide is available on line. I encourage folks to dig into that material is this issue is of concern.

Bottom line NMFS is very concern with the continued declined in the PS ESA listed Chinook following the listing nearly 20 years ago. It looks to me that the Stillaguamish situation is just the tip of the ice berg! As a society we have not faced up to the fact changes in our collective behaviors is needed if the habitat of our rivers and Sound are to restored to the point that salmon can be supported. Clearly the salmon have paid a heavy price but it is equally clear that as the feds tight the fishing impact screws the anglers in Washington about to pay a very heavy price for that neglect as well. Hey it is less disrupting to throw the anglers under the bus than modify behaviors that are negatively affect salmon habitat. At this point not sure there is much WDFW or Washington State can do at this point.

Curt
 

JayB

Active Member
#79
When the NMFS and NOAA actually take any action that keeps all gillnets out of the water in the Puget Sound in addition to shutting down the sport fisheries then I'll be persuaded that their objective is species preservation. Until then it's hard to conclude that this is anything other than an overtly political intervention on behalf of the tribes masquerading as a conservation effort.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater
#80
If interested the audio of the agency presentation to the commission (was available via phone conference for those that signed up early) and the material (power point) provide is available on line. I encourage folks to dig into that material is this issue is of concern.

Bottom line NMFS is very concern with the continued declined in the PS ESA listed Chinook following the listing nearly 20 years ago. It looks to me that the Stillaguamish situation is just the tip of the ice berg! As a society we have not faced up to the fact changes in our collective behaviors is needed if the habitat of our rivers and Sound are to restored to the point that salmon can be supported. Clearly the salmon have paid a heavy price but it is equally clear that as the feds tight the fishing impact screws the anglers in Washington about to pay a very heavy price for that neglect as well. Hey it is less disrupting to throw the anglers under the bus than modify behaviors that are negatively affect salmon habitat. At this point not sure there is much WDFW or Washington State can do at this point.

Curt
How about addressing the loss of Washington fish in Alaska and BC?
We are at the bottom of the barrel while all the cream gets taken off the top.
I equate this agreement to be on the same level that stopped folks from fishing searuns in streams.
That closure saved what, 1.5 Stilly coho?
This agreement saves 9-10 Stilly chinook?
How many Stilly chinook get harvested before they hit Washington waters?

I’ll continue to press on those I think need to hear my opinion on this.
SF
 

Bob Smith

Active Member
#82
Aside from commenting on the Washington Chinook Resource Management Plan - I would also suggest that you monitor the salmon regulation process in the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) process and provide public input prior to the setting of the salmon season regulations (April 5-11 2018 in Portland). The link to the PFMC salmon page is: https://www.pcouncil.org/salmon/background/
 
#83
Maybe the commission wanted it to go this way. They get someone to do their dirty deeds for them and they get to say “we didn’t even know this was going on!” This whole deal is moving me to be an open advocate for poaching.
What does this plan have to do with your poaching, and poaching advocacy? Explain the connection. I like to know how poachers think. I thought most were poor people trying to feed there families and not confused fly fishermen.
 
#84
How about addressing the loss of Washington fish in Alaska and BC?
We are at the bottom of the barrel while all the cream gets taken off the top.
I equate this agreement to be on the same level that stopped folks from fishing searuns in streams.
That closure saved what, 1.5 Stilly coho?
This agreement saves 9-10 Stilly chinook?
How many Stilly chinook get harvested before they hit Washington waters?

I’ll continue to press on those I think need to hear my opinion on this.
SF
Stillaguamish fishing related mortality
AK BC SUSTroll SUS Net SUS Sport
7.5% 63.6% 7.0% 4.9% 17.0%

71.1% killed north of the border.
 

bk paige

Wishin I was on the Sauk
#85
What does this plan have to do with your poaching, and poaching advocacy? Explain the connection. I like to know how poachers think. I thought most were poor people trying to feed there families and not confused fly fishermen.

Not all poachers are poor, I know a guy that is far far from being poor that is a poacher. He does it because he can and would rather take more so the tribes cant.
Stupid is as stupid does
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#86
Not all poachers are poor, I know a guy that is far far from being poor that is a poacher. He does it because he can and would rather take more so the tribes cant.
Stupid is as stupid does
billy Franks Jr. was a rogue Native American gillnetter who illegally netted rivers for years. At the time of his passing he was heralded as a Native American icon for his illegal protesting activities. Soon I may become a person noted for my C&R protest fishing.
 

Greg Armstrong

OldRodsHaveMoreFun
#87
#88
Stillaguamish fishing related mortality
AK BC SUSTroll SUS Net SUS Sport
7.5% 63.6% 7.0% 4.9% 17.0%

71.1% killed north of the border.
That's the discussion that needs to get started. While I like harvesting in the mixed stock areas of the ocean (better table fare, higher adventure), it'd be better for the fish and for management to move toward terminal-heavy fisheries. That way we actually get our half of the pie, and it's a much bigger pie. Tribes win with a bigger pie too.

Problem is the inertia of the status quo. . .how to curb the enormous commercial intercept fisheries in BC and AK, and how to convince Joe-Q-Public that wild salmon aren't that good to eat from the supermarket after all?

fb
 

TJ Fisher

Active Member
#89
First I'd like to say this post is just my opinion.

I've spent quite a large amount of time reading all of the posts here and trying to find as much information as I could. The only fishery that I can relate this to is the Maryland striped bass. Definitely a huge success story and I think it is achievable with this salmon population as well.

With this 10 year plan I haven't seen anything that is going to help with recovery of this population. First and foremost, tribal or not, gill nets are horrible. No I can't even say "preserving a way of life" makes gill netting acceptable. Salmon should be hook and line ONLY even for the commercial fishery and this should be implemented by ALL parties involved. Unfortunately for the powers that be it seems salmon aren't salmon but only dollar signs and negotiating tokens.

Habitat restoration should be priority #2 after making drastic changes to the COMMERCIAL and TRIBAL fisheries. Decrease mortality rate, take the steps to protect and increase the young fish.

Proper conservation training. How to properly handle and release fish. This is where catch and release fisheries really shine. The opportunity to teach people of the importance of proper handling, proper habitat management, proper releasing.

This 10 year plan is a kick in the crotch and a big FU to all recreational anglers. Until steps are taken to properly manage these fish, instead of brow beating recreational anglers to allow more for tribal and commercial fisheries, these fish stocks will never recover.

Tim
 

Dizane

Coast to Coast
#90
First I'd like to say this post is just my opinion.

I've spent quite a large amount of time reading all of the posts here and trying to find as much information as I could. The only fishery that I can relate this to is the Maryland striped bass. Definitely a huge success story and I think it is achievable with this salmon population as well.

With this 10 year plan I haven't seen anything that is going to help with recovery of this population. First and foremost, tribal or not, gill nets are horrible. No I can't even say "preserving a way of life" makes gill netting acceptable. Salmon should be hook and line ONLY even for the commercial fishery and this should be implemented by ALL parties involved. Unfortunately for the powers that be it seems salmon aren't salmon but only dollar signs and negotiating tokens.

Habitat restoration should be priority #2 after making drastic changes to the COMMERCIAL and TRIBAL fisheries. Decrease mortality rate, take the steps to protect and increase the young fish.

Proper conservation training. How to properly handle and release fish. This is where catch and release fisheries really shine. The opportunity to teach people of the importance of proper handling, proper habitat management, proper releasing.

This 10 year plan is a kick in the crotch and a big FU to all recreational anglers. Until steps are taken to properly manage these fish, instead of brow beating recreational anglers to allow more for tribal and commercial fisheries, these fish stocks will never recover.

Tim
I used to live in NJ and fished striped bass back there. I've sometimes wondered what imposing a rule similar to the 3-mile rule would do for salmon. It seems that would be a possible way to allow people to continue to fish up and down the coast, but also provide refuge for a certain percentage of the population.
 

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