NFR Union Gap Fissures

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#31
Amen to that! I wonder who owns the surrounding land and who sold/authorized development of the gravel pit at that location. Sort of makes you wonder how such things are reviewed & approved, if that is/was done at all . . .
 

Big Rob

Active Member
#32
Doubt it was even a thought. They probably only looked at potential runoff into the yak, but not slides.
I wonder if all the recent St Helens tremors shook it enough get an old crack moving again....
 
#33
Amen to that! I wonder who owns the surrounding land and who sold/authorized development of the gravel pit at that location. Sort of makes you wonder how such things are reviewed & approved, if that is/was done at all . . .
Back then, I doubt it. Consequences to the environment weren't even a footnote.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#34
My intent is not to trivialize this potential disaster but to remind us all that we aren't Clan of the Cave Bear; I live in a house built with harvested wood (logged trees). The wood sits on a concrete foundation with gravel from a pit making up the structural component of the concrete. The street in front of my house has concrete curb and gutter and bituminous pavement most often called asphaltic concrete. I'm guessing each and everyone of us has pretty much the same habitat.

I hope the slide is confined to the quarry site. I hope no one is injured, or God forbid, killed. My heart goes out to the folks who are living in the likely slide path. I hope that our planners and government officials learn from this. Question: When did this site become a mine for gravel? How long has it been mining rock at this location?
 

Gyrfalcon2015

Wild Trout forever
#36
Really feel bad for the kids and pets, livestock who do not have input, or for the poverty and income that keeps people in the risk zone.

Also, do not need heroes or Harry Truman Spirit Lake-types.

Safety to all involved.
 
#42
Doubt it was even a thought. They probably only looked at potential runoff into the yak, but not slides...
I buy a few million in rock each year, and there’s a lot more science that goes into the investigation of a potential site, and the final product than anyone on here seems to understand.
The geologists that did the initial drills/samples to let the owner know the types of rock, quantity of mineable rock, and quality of rock at the time didn’t feel that there was a warrantable issue like a slide, or they wouldn’t have advised development of the site.
 

Lue Taylor

Lue Taylor/dbfly
#45
I was fishing on the Naches a few days before that slide. It was a bright sunny day with very little wind when a tree just fell across the road near my truck, another person driving along help me move some of the tree that we could move. Then 3 days later the slide happen in the area I was fishing.
 

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