Sous Vide. Anyone use it?

jwg

Active Member
#31
jwg. Thanks for that and information. It took me a while to get through it, but well worth the read.
So, in terms of cookery, would there be any reason not to cook sous vide at 160F ?
This is still well below water boiling temperature at 212F, and well below grilling or frying temperatures?

But it is a temperature one can be more confident about with regard to food safety.

At 160F, would you still gain a lot of the slow cook, sealed bag, advantages of sous vide?

I am attaching another article, on smoking fish safely, that says a lot about temperatures and food safety. Once I knew this, I discovered that my small size Little Chief Smoker, even with extensive insulation put around ti, does not generally reach much above 140F, so once the fish is both well smoked and dry, I move it into the house oven for a final spell to make sure it is over 160F in the meat for 30 min.

In the food smoking case, we not only want the bacteria to not be multiplying, we want to make sure they are dead, or at least not going to multiply at refrigerator temperatures, if you are not going to eat the food immediately.

Jay
 

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dld

Active Member
#32
So, in terms of cookery, would there be any reason not to cook sous vide at 160F ?
This is still well below water boiling temperature at 212F, and well below grilling or frying temperatures?

But it is a temperature one can be more confident about with regard to food safety.

At 160F, would you still gain a lot of the slow cook, sealed bag, advantages of sous vide?

I am attaching another article, on smoking fish safely, that says a lot about temperatures and food safety. Once I knew this, I discovered that my small size Little Chief Smoker, even with extensive insulation put around ti, does not generally reach much above 140F, so once the fish is both well smoked and dry, I move it into the house oven for a final spell to make sure it is over 160F in the meat for 30 min.

In the food smoking case, we not only want the bacteria to not be multiplying, we want to make sure they are dead, or at least not going to multiply at refrigerator temperatures, if you are not going to eat the food immediately.

Jay
If you cook proteins in sous vide at 160F, you will be cooking it well-done. While a well-done steak in sous-vide is, apparently, juicier than a well-done by other means, it is still going to be dry...and I wouldn't eat it.

I've done tons of pork chops at 140F and had no problems. I've done tilapia and shrimp at 130F and 140F, respectively. I've done steak at 129F (it was a bit too rare, I've gone to about 132 now).

I haven't gotten sick on any of the food.
 
Last edited:
#33
Dld, would you please share some additional info that you've discovered on temps and times for cooking various proteins via sous vide? Do you also make adjustments for thickness?
 

dld

Active Member
#34
Dld, would you please share some additional info that you've discovered on temps and times for cooking various proteins via sous vide? Do you also make adjustments for thickness?
I usually just google 'sous vide **', for whatever I am doing. If a 'Serious Eats', or 'Food Lab result shows up, that is what I follow--Kenji is very scientific about his approach.

For instance, his steak guide: http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/06/food-lab-complete-guide-to-sous-vide-steak.html

From the article:

"Timings are all given for steaks one-and-a-half to two inches thick. For steaks one inch or less, initial cooking time can be shortened to 40 minutes. Steaks cooked under 130°F (54.4°C) should not be cooked longer than two-and-a-half hours at a time for food safety reasons"

One thing I find is that I do tend to cook a little more on the 'done' side for my stuff. I generally order medium-rare for steaks, but I adjust a bit towards medium.

*I misrepresented my steak temps originally in my previous post, now corrected.
 

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#37
Holy shit, this is a legit method????? I've been doing this for years actually. Especially in camps where people had specific meals. I would use my vacuum sealer to seal up prepared meals and then just boil the bags to desired doneness. After reading this a little more in depth I like the idea of grilling a little after heating to Temp to get a nice crust.
 

dld

Active Member
#38
Holy shit, this is a legit method????? I've been doing this for years actually. Especially in camps where people had specific meals. I would use my vacuum sealer to seal up prepared meals and then just boil the bags to desired doneness. After reading this a little more in depth I like the idea of grilling a little after heating to Temp to get a nice crust.
Totally legit, Jerry. The water isn't boiling, tho--the water is held at the final temperature that you want the food.

The sear after is great and quick. A cast iron, or carbon steel pan usually works best.
 

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#39
Totally legit, Jerry. The water isn't boiling, tho--the water is held at the final temperature that you want the food.

The sear after is great and quick. A cast iron, or carbon steel pan usually works best.
I didn't use boiling water, why I was surprised by the technique after reading it. I would use a clip on thermometer in the pot to bring to temp then shut off. I just used boiling as a general term to heat water, not literal.
 

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#41
Do you use the same bags as for vacuum packing.
FoodSaver bags?

j
Yup. I would prep the special meals and seal them up. Then I would heat up the water and cook in the bag. Especially when some people couldn't have food prepared on surfaces that had meat cooked on it. Since I wasn't boiling the bags they held up well.
 

Trapper

Author, Writer, Photographer
#43
I have cooked thousands of meals for hunting spike camps. But those meals were cooked, vacuumed sealed, and frozen. The guides would simply fire up their JetBoil or other stove and heat the water and meal in the package. It shortens the time needed as they typically get back to spike camp late and tired. It also cuts down on the amount of fuel needed and pots and pans needed.

I haven't had anyone requesting Kosher or meals that no part could be cooked on a pan previously used to cook meat.

I would like to use this method for several situations but many places I cook don't have power. Some places I cook have a generator, but it doesn't run all day.

I'm expecting the product to deliver today.
 

smc

Active Member
#44
Have used this (Sous Vide) for turkey breast & prime rib so far. Brown for crust before immersing. Absolutely perfect every time; done to perfection, tender and moist.
 

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#45
I have cooked thousands of meals for hunting spike camps. But those meals were cooked, vacuumed sealed, and frozen. The guides would simply fire up their JetBoil or other stove and heat the water and meal in the package. It shortens the time needed as they typically get back to spike camp late and tired. It also cuts down on the amount of fuel needed and pots and pans needed.

I haven't had anyone requesting Kosher or meals that no part could be cooked on a pan previously used to cook meat.

I would like to use this method for several situations but many places I cook don't have power. Some places I cook have a generator, but it doesn't run all day.

I'm expecting the product to deliver today.
I can't remember what it's called Trapper, but it's either a lifestyle or condition where they couldn't have their food cooked on anything cooked with meat. It was odd and a pain. I'm sure you've seen the food allergy part a lot. I always request all allergies before hand so I can adjust.
 

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