Squamish River

TheAngler

Active Member
#1
I am thinking of heading up to to the Squamish River sometime in the next few months. I am hoping to spend some time swinging for bulls.

Are there any good sources for information on this river and is this a wadable or will I need a boat? Any info would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Benjamin
 
#5
Hey man, come on up here and pop in to Pacific Angler and visit me! I fish that river usually once or twice a week, and between myself and Matt, usually write the report for our website/blog (www.pacificangler.ca)
I won't post any specifics on here, but feel free to message me or give me a ring as well (1-604-872-2204)

Unfortunately, Whistler Fly fishing is closed now as Brian has moved on to guiding and running Skeena Spey, so he's not in the area too much anymore- though he is a very kind and helpful angler, and if reachable, will be helpful.

Hope that helps,

Jordan
 
#6
Hey man, come on up here and pop in to Pacific Angler and visit me! I fish that river usually once or twice a week, and between myself and Matt, usually write the report for our website/blog (www.pacificangler.ca)
I won't post any specifics on here, but feel free to message me or give me a ring as well (1-604-872-2204)

Unfortunately, Whistler Fly fishing is closed now as Brian has moved on to guiding and running Skeena Spey, so he's not in the area too much anymore- though he is a very kind and helpful angler, and if reachable, will be helpful.

Hope that helps,

Jordan
Hey Jordan. Came up for the weekend and Fished the Squamish for chum with no luck aside from a small dolly. Met a local named Stephan who spoke of your shop. Nice guy and talked about how the fishing has been slow for this time of year. Any word from your side? It'd be awesome to hook one of those chrome chum on a spey rod! Any way cheer and hopefully see ya on the water.

-Ian
 
#9
Feel free to message me if you get up. Always looking for fishing partners. Be warned there is a grizzly sow and her cub hanging out on some relatively popular runs.

 
#12
The chum run has been a little slower this year- hence the retention closure, but the Coho and bull trout fishing has been incredible...
The Coho have been fishing since September, with anglers finding success on gear and flies. The Squamish is quite wide lower down, but it thins out and starts to braid as you go higher, creating some amazing back/side channels. Egging/beading for trout on 4 or 5wt rods is pretty standard this time heading forward, as well as swinging and stripping sculpins.
For Coho, swinging flies in moving runs has been pretty good, but the cast-and-strip fishery has been nothing short of incredible. In all honesty, this has probably been one of the best years I've seen in about 7 years- for both numbers and size.
The fish are throughout, so make sure to explore. And yes, be careful of bears. There are a lot of black bears, but the grizzlies are around also. Same with cats: had one run past me and a friend last year and we never heard it, even though it ran past and infront of us. We could see it, but it never made a sound, even while leaping and bounding.
 

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#14
Honestly the chum haven't shown up this year. People are blaming the mixed stock Georgia straight commercial fishery but who really knows. Runs that should be holding thousands have a few dozen. Its that way for pretty much all lower mainland systems so something in the chuck severely hit them this last cycle. Its pretty dire. As for coho fishing and bull, its been fine if you can find where they are holding.

Pmed you about how far up he fished.

Also river is blown.

https://wateroffice.ec.gc.ca/report/real_time_e.html?stn=08GA022
 
#15
@HawaiianInWa I mostly fish the upper section, a ways up where the pavement turns to gravel. The key is finding the fish- which if you know how to read water, really isn't that hard. If it looks like the fish aren't going to hold there but rather shoot through, then that's usually what they'll do. Finding slower side channels, troughs, or buckets (just like on any river) is usually a good idea. There are the more common tributaries lower down that also hold fish- but just like the main stem, you'll want to locate the fish on those as well.
The fish often show themselves, and where you see one or two rolling, there's usually a few more.

Having a variety of flies for swinging and stripping (weighted and unweighted), as well as having a few different tips, can help. There is one spot where the fish will rest on a seam and you need to approach it from above them, swinging your fly alongside the school. For this, I like using a clear intermediate since they will see the tip as it swings in next to them.

At another spot, the angle of the river helps and how you approach from behind/side, you can use a type 3 or 6 no problem as the fish are usually closer to where the fly and leader lands first, and you strip away from them.

The biggest thing is to just go and have fun, and explore, and be safe.
 

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