Any tips for conserving and/or leaving a smaller footprint?

#31
I can tell you that this won't go away any time soon. In fact it's being worse and worse daily. People that were ordering one meal a week are now ordering a weekly supply. And more and more people are ordering. The account of these fresh meals delivered to your door companies are gaining in popularity. Crazy how fast the craze has caught on.
That’s exactly what I was thinking about. The wife signed us up for the blue apron trial deal. It’s nice with a little kid because no store visit and it does get you to cook new things.

But man oh man the plastic! Every ingredient in its own baggie or tub. Then there is the frozen bag of goo to keep it cold in shipping and bubble wrap around that. Then wrap it all up in a giant styrofoam bin.

Total nightmare.

I even see it in the grocery stores now with single serve salads with 8 different compartments.
 

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#32
That’s exactly what I was thinking about. The wife signed us up for the blue apron trial deal. It’s nice with a little kid because no store visit and it does get you to cook new things.

But man oh man the plastic! Every ingredient in its own baggie or tub. Then there is the frozen bag of goo to keep it cold in shipping and bubble wrap around that. Then wrap it all up in a giant styrofoam bin.

Total nightmare.

I even see it in the grocery stores now with single serve salads with 8 different compartments.
I went from seeing maybe 10 boxes a week to over 200 a week and it's growing.
 

JohnB

Active Member
#33
Hot water heater timer switch is another coin saver, easy install and second biggest electrical user for a lot of homes, a timer switch can save about 150 bucks a year on the high end, 60 to 70 on average, depends on kWh costs of course.
Any recommendations on products for this? I'd never thought of this but it seems like such an obvious idea. Do you have any other tips?
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#34
Anybody tried one of those programmable electrical switches Home Depot sells,i’m Thinking this might be the solution for the porch light that seems to never get turned off
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#36
By code, electrical installations/modifications should be done properly & inspected. That covers your butt should there be a problem/fire/or worse. That being said, I have done some of my own work, but I have the competence & am comfortable doing so. I had major upgrades/changes done in accordance with the code by a licensed Electrician. You'll have to make that call for yourself, Swimmy.
 

Swimmy

Riffle > Run > Pool
#37
I can organize with the best of 'em but electrical stuff ain't in my wheelhouse. Sounds like I'd be best served hiring someone.
 

quilbilly

Big Time Hater
#38
You can do it yourself if you know electrical work, but get a permit and an inspection if your jurisdiction requires it.
When in doubt, get a licensed electrician to do the work.
Its a decent money saver...
 

Josh

dead in the water
#39
Reuse. Give a second life to whatever you can to avoid buying new. Plastic bags from the store become poo bags for dog walks, sour cream containers hold leftovers. Wash out ziploc bags and use them a 2nd or 3rd time. If everything we put into the waste stream had been used multiple times, it would reduce the need for a lot of new things to be created.

Compost. Easy to do. Takes waste out of the dump and helps your garden (if you do it at home). If your community offers industrial composting, you done even have to deal with it at your house. Just fill the bin and someone else will take it away and do the dirty work (of course then you don't get the goodness for your garden).

LED bulbs. Not just because they use less energy, but because they are less toxic to deal with than fluorescent (last longer too).

Thermostat. Turn it down at night. Turn it down when you aren't home. Just turn it down a click or two and put on a sweater when you are home.

Save water. Low flow toilets, showers, and sinks. Don't let the water run while shaving or brushing. Don't wash your car every week. Let your lawn die, don't water it all summer. In the northwest, it'll be back green again as soon as the fall rains come. No big deal.

Buy local. Meat/produce that is produced by a local farmer doesn't come at the cost of tons of emissions and fossil fuel use to get it to you that a chicken or tomato raised in the south does. Probably has fewer pesticides/chemicals/hormones as well.

Eat less meat. Specifically, eat less beef. Beef takes a TON of resources to raise. By some counts, 10x more resources than chicken. Creates a ton of waste, may contribute to greenhouse gasses, and is a major part of the public lands debate besides.

Make your electronics last for another year. Yeah, it's fun to update to the newest phone every year. But electronics production/waste is pretty nasty when you get right down to it. Where do you think all that copper/gold from the Pebble Mine will end up?

Drive less. This is a big one, most of us like the fact that we can just hop in our cars and get somewhere quickly. But cutting out a few trips a week by walking or biking or even taking the bus makes a big difference. Maybe pay a little more to buy food from the local grocery you can walk to instead of driving to the store that has the best deals. Or, if you've got a job that allows it, ask your employer if you can work from home X number of days a month.

--------------

One thing that people get trapped into is thinking they have to do ALL THE THINGS. I mean, sure, the more you can do the better. But even doing one thing is better than doing zero things. It's not an all of nothing sort of deal. Decide what is most important to you. Can't fit in a Prius and need that 4x4 f250 to get up fishing roads? Fine, how about carpooling to work a couple days or riding your bike to the store? Hate super low flow shower heads? No problem. How about watering your lawn or washing your car less often?

If we all did a little, that would add up to a huge amount.
 

quilbilly

Big Time Hater
#40
Avoid plastic anything.....there's this stuff called glass, lasts a long time, easy to wash, with a little care you won't break it.

:)

You don't have to eat dirt and live in a cave to make an impact.....anything that's single use packaged is probably easily replaced for cheaper by something else.

Did I mention how doing this can save money.....so even if you hate liberal greenies, despise recycling and laugh at a prius.....they're saving money in many cases, while you're not.
 

Shad

Active Member
#43
We've got to get off plastic.

This is getting more important now, as China (the largest buyer of recycled plastics from the US) is no longer accepting recycled plastic with low level contaminants for manufacturing. It's virtually impossible to get recycled plastics clean enough to meet the new standard. That means no buyer, which in turn means that if we want to continue recycling programs, we have to subsidize them. That makes recycling outrageously expensive, which means it won't be long until it's the next "government overreach" on the chopping block.

Best solution to plastic is to stop using it. Too bad the stuff is so damned useful and versatile. On the plus side, replacing plastics could create a lot of well-paying jobs....
 
#44
We do recycle cardboard, paper, aluminum, and plastic.
I do turn lights off when not being used. Trying to teach the kids to do the same.
I always pick up garbage when on the river.

I should look into LED.
Unplug TV, Computer, and any and all recharging activities to avoid phantom loads.
 

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