Pesticides killing salmon.

KerryS

Ignored Member
#16
I read an article years ago (by years I mean over 20) where some researchers tracked certain pesticide and fertilizer compound levels in the waterways and the level of those same product sales from retail garden centers. Not to surprising when graphed side by side the graphs were nearly identical. As the sale of fertilizer and pesticides increased so did the levels of those products increase in the water.
 
#18
Avoid Scott’s and Monsanto products. Bad for the fish.
When I had a yard I never used fertilizer or pesticides, I would put lime down once in a while to keep the moss and butter cups down. Had a tool that would pop out broad leafs without bending over and left the clippings on the yard most of the time. I had 10 beds for organic veggies, surrounded by wood chips,but I moved and left all that behind. My new yard is all rock, I will build a few beds for veggies.
 

Skip Enge

Active Member
Staff member
#19
When I had a yard I never used fertilizer or pesticides, I would put lime down once in a while to keep the moss and butter cups down. Had a tool that would pop out broad leafs without bending over and left the clippings on the yard most of the time. I had 10 beds for organic veggies, surrounded by wood chips,but I moved and left all that behind. My new yard is all rock, I will build a few beds for veggies.
white vinegar will kill most yard weeds...with repeated applications...
 
#20
E

Shop at the COOP and local/organic grocery stores. .

If not to keep yourself from getting cancer and being infertile, do it for the the fish at least.
fully agree, unfortunately, most folks don't have the budget to eat organically, nor the time or access in many cases. And the air itself is a bigger issue for most.

Ran a project in Mountain View, CA, heart of Silicon Valley, the build-out of a 17 acre high tech campus on a former chip manufacturing site that due to an underground tank spill of TCE during the 80's had been designated a Fed Superfund site. At the beginning, I brought in a renown environmental engineering firm to run 24/7/7 air monitoring tests to determine what exactly was the exposure risk before we started the project, so we could mitigate any negative findings through building construction and systems.

So the outcome once all the data was collected, analyzed and presented? The exposure readings for TCE pretty much untraceable. The overall results? The general air a toxic stew of over 120 known carcinogens, the most dominant of the Class 1 carcinogens particulates from diesel exhaust.

Part of the final presentation was comparing local air exposure readings with the 24 most populated cities in the US. And in every city, the dominant Class 1 carcinogen - particulates from diesel exhaust. Combined with the other primary and background carcinogens, the cancer risks of living in those 24 cities was, no surprise, considerably higher then living out of them.

It's just not what you eat, it's perhaps even more so what you breathe.
 
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_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
#21
Not to be smarmy, but genuinely curious. Do home organic gardeners do anything about air pollution, and do you water with city water (chlorine)?
 
#24
Man, I wish I had an answer on the air pollution.

I don’t know the extent to which my practices remediate the air pollution. But, in general I think my practices may be a plus overall on the local watershed and air quality. Permaculture principles , brotha.
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
#25
I was thinking more about the air your plants are growing in. You see photos of community gardens on rooftops in the midst of some pretty foul looking air which gives me a mind's eye of hydrocarbon fallout settling onto the plants and soil. I suppose it's impossible to mitigate everything.

My wife had a garden for awhile. In recent years our neighbor to the rear has taken to screaming obscenities towards us at the top of her voice. It often goes on for hours until her voice gives out. So gardening has fallen to the wayside. Other folks around her have no contact orders. Our court date is next Monday so maybe we can try a little gardening again...if she stays on her meds.
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#27
Our local water system is ground water from a couple of wells. Once in a great while it gets mildly contaminated (one time a cover was loose on top of a tank, and bird feces got in). The water quality is regularly tested at various points throughout the system, and usually is free from coliform bacteria. So, most of the time it requires no chlorine or other chemicals, which are only used when necessary to correct a problem. We receive a notification about it.
I had a couple of rain barrels going on the back side of my garage, but I removed the rain gutters there, and now just let it run off the edge. I may reposition the barrels on the front side.
I buy organic produce when I can get it (local market has a small, spotty offering), and eat locally caught fish.
Sounds like Skip has the organic gardening supplementation down to a science! I'll be setting up my raised beds and containers again.
 

Skip Enge

Active Member
Staff member
#28
Don't have that hat, however a cold one will be in order later today.

Painting a broad "Republican" brush stroke was baseless, clueless and most of all...pointless.
Keep the carp in the carp forum. ;)
The environmental concerns fall by the wayside currently...rolling back "abuse" controls...China stated at early stages of their economical revolution that while there is a concern about their massive pollution issues they would fix it later as the United States has...we are in a denial cycle...concern and legislation will return but in the meantime and until that happens we are stacking the cards against reparation progress through policies and emphasis that feed the rich first...Process and regulation were a beginning and additive toward environmental healing. So in this thread I have to say, comments are viable and important to recognize. Science is not some liberal religion...Contrarianism seems to be.
 

Skip Enge

Active Member
Staff member
#30
we have a couple rain barrels with spigots...gravity feed spot watering...and of course we have a great well...there are so many alternatives to gardening amendments that are easy to do. The problem is often folks buy questionable products that harm the environment and set one up for an endless cycle of feast and famine in the soil...I garden with the emphasis on soil ph balance and rather low nitrogen...keeping the soil healthy...Our garbage pick up is very minimal as is our recycling...composting is a big deal for us...and not difficult. as for concerns for the air...Yeah I drive an internal combustion car. Electric would be an option if affordable but even with electricity though it does not pollute directly...we have all read about dirty electricity ...Anyway solar has become viable but still not for the average home owner...all about the money...Our problem is a complex ecocultural one. I just try to do the best I can, and even with that I have stained the environment plenty. The ecological movement that needs to happen is precycling...realize what you are buying and the ramifications.
 

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