Lone Lake Report 1/18/2018

Starman77

Active Member
#1
20180118_105232 25.jpg


After reading Adrian's thread on Lone Lake recently, I thought I'd give it a try on Thursday after not having fished it since before the summer kill of 2016. When I arrived it was nice and sunny as shown in the photo above, but it soon became really windy (white caps and windrows), heavily overcast and rainy. Maybe that falling barometer wasn't good for fishing, as I only hooked one fish in about six hours of fishing.

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In spite of being really cold and wet, I stuck it out to sunset to see if the evening bite would get the fish active, and as the sun set I started hooking fish and in 45 minutes I had hooked six fish, but then it shut off like a light switch and that was it. But, hanging around till dusk paid off this time and saved my day.

The fish were all 15 to 16 inches in length, mostly a little dark and pretty beat up from being caught so many times, I suppose, but they mostly fought decently enough. All the fish I hooked took a BH Dark Green Simi Seal Leech. Here's a photo of the best looking fish:

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I'm assuming that these 15 to 16 inchers are from the February planting of 450 one to one and a half pounders planted by the various local fly fishing clubs and not the 3,000 catchables planted in March by the WDFW, as it seems that the catchables wouldn't be that large, but I'm not sure about that (I'd expect that the catchables would be more like 12 to 13 inches). However, I didn't hook any fish that were smaller than 15 inches, so I don't know. Anyway, kudos to the fly fishing clubs that contributed to the fish planting!

Had the lake to myself on Thursday; guess no one else was as foolish/crazy to fight the wind like I was. However, my philosophy is that I have a much better chance of catching a fish being out in bad weather than sitting in front of my TV at home. :)

The carp exclusion zones are all gone now. Anyone know if the grass carp got killed off in the summer of 2016 with the trout? Carp are pretty tough, so I'm guessing that they mostly survived.

Signs are still posted warning of blue-green algae, so if you bring your dog fishing with you, don't let it drink the water.

Rex
 
#4
Rex, great photos and obviously I can't say enough about the value in simply "sticking around." I love reports like this.

We'll fish sometime..

-Tim
 
#8
... The carp exclusion zones are all gone now. Anyone know if the grass carp got killed off in the summer of 2016 with the trout? Carp are pretty tough, so I'm guessing that they mostly survived...
They survived - carp are even hardier than bass. :mad:

I am wondering though, does anyone have any info on how the bow fishing has been going? I have high hopes for this... :)
 
#10
Great report Rex,

The fish I caught were all dark too, typically very dark. My observation was not that they’d be been caught before and so messed up but rather they were in full on spawning mode and were just plain ‘ugly’. As an eg, only one fish had a withered pectoral fin, likely a juvenile injury from the hatchery. It will be interesting to see in the next few months how the fish recover.

Dave
 

Starman77

Active Member
#11
Great report Rex,

The fish I caught were all dark too, typically very dark. My observation was not that they’d be been caught before and so messed up but rather they were in full on spawning mode and were just plain ‘ugly’. As an eg, only one fish had a withered pectoral fin, likely a juvenile injury from the hatchery. It will be interesting to see in the next few months how the fish recover.

Dave
Thanks, Dave...

I wouldn't say that the fish I landed were really dark and ugly, but just slightly dark and not in their full spawning colorations. However, most had certainly been caught before, as evidenced by the loss of scales and hook marks on their lips. I'd guess that the appearance differences in the fish you and I were catching would have to do with the location on the lake where the fish were hooked, as I'm sure there are some areas where the fish congregate to try to spawn, like the mouths of the inlet creeks, gravelly shallow areas or underwater springs. Whereabouts on the lake were you hooking these dark fish? I think of Dusty Lake as I write, as in early spring when you fish just off the mouth of the inlet creek on the east shore where everyone launches, you'll mainly catch dark spawners, but elsewhere on the lake you'll mostly catch better looking and better fighting fish.

I've also wondered if the 450 fish that were privately purchased and planted were triploids or diploids. I'm guessing that they were triploids. Since triploids don't go through the spawning process, you'd think that any triploids would be silvery. However, it may be that even if they were triploids, they still might get a little darker to better match the tea-colored bottom. I'd guess that the catchables that were planted by the WDFW were diploids, and those diploids would certainly go through the spawning process.

Rex
 
#12
Hi Rex,

Mine were mainly caught off the point by the shore right off the launch, we call it eagle point as the eagles often sit in the trees there...we call ourselves the originals :) Others were caught to the east side. I don’t know of any tiny creeks or seeps. I was in 13 - 17 ft depth.

Both spots are popular re chiros. I actually think you’re just a lot more observant than me. I looked at my photos and while dark, only one fish has lost some scales. A lot of the fish I land lose the hook when netted and I simply let em go right there.

I don’t look but maybe now I’ll look more carefully for scars.

Dave
 

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