Favorite Deschutes River Trout Rod

GWJ

Active Member
I'm thinking about picking up a new single handed trout rod, specifically for dry flies on the Deschutes and other northwest rivers. I'm torn between picking up a 4wt or 5wt. I'm considering a used or closeout Sage Circa in 589-4 or 489-4, or a Burkheimer DAL in either 4 or 5wt, essentially a deeper loading road to toss dries. While I'm leaning toward a 4wt, I'm wondering if I'll regret that decision if the wind picks up or if I fish the salmon fly hatch and am tossing bigger bugs. I grew up primarily fishing a 9' 5wt, but haven't chased trout much in recent years, focusing mostly on swinging flies with a two-handers for steelhead. What's your go-to Deschutes dry fly rod? Any thoughts or suggestions appreciated.
 

Mike Ediger

WFF Supporter
There will be others who can chime in and fish the Deshutes a lot more often then I, but I do know the area. I think you hit the nail on the head when you mentioned wind and at times bigger bugs. I think you would be under gunned with a 4 weight or a Circa. I would certainly be considering a 9’ 5 weight and something with a bit of muscle when it’s called for. But again you’ll probably get others who May have other ideas.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Penobscot

Active Member
I will usually a 6 weight on the Deschutes because of the wind, it’s pretty decent sized water, and there’s often a chance for hooking up with a steelhead.
Also those redsides are scrappers, I’d rather get them in and let them go as opposed to a drawn out affair with a 4-weight.
 

Kyle Smith

Active Member
Don't get the Circa for that kind of fishing. Pure spring creek rod right there. The regular trout action Burkie 590 would be sweet. If I was to sell all my shit and get one moderate big river dry fly rod, I would be trying out the Scott GS 886 and Sage Mod 690. Or save some money and find a Hardy Jet 906 or Sage Accel 590.

The Sage X 590 is wonderful, with a true to weight line it virtually forces you to cast 50 feet like the rod is hungry. Took me about 4 days to adjust to, now I can cast 2 feet of line and 15 feet of leader exactly where I want it.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
I think the 5 is the best choice for the Deschutes but i don't nymph much. Well hardly at all really. If i did i might be persuaded to go with the 6 as well.
 

Steve Saville

WFF Supporter
When I go to the Deschutes, I take numerous rods. My rod of choice is a Sage LL 490. I've caught a lot of nice trout on it there. If I want a 5 wt, I use a Loomis NRX LP and for a 6 wt. I have a Winston BIIx. The Winston and Sage in those models are not available any longer except through a third party but the Loomis can be had at a local fly shop for about $750. I also take a 5 wt. switch and a 6 wt. spey rod.
 

jamma

Active Member
I will usually a 6 weight on the Deschutes because of the wind, it’s pretty decent sized water, and there’s often a chance for hooking up with a steelhead.
Also those redsides are scrappers, I’d rather get them in and let them go as opposed to a drawn out affair with a 4-weight.
...although I would go beyond calling them"scrappers",some of those fish have shoulders that go beyond their size.
 

Bob Balder

Willing to learn anything...
I have spent a considerable amount of time on the Deschtes, primarily in the lower canyon between Maupin and Mack's Canyon. I use a 5wt. almost exclusively, spend 85% of my time nymphing. In the evening we have a few favorite spots where we fish dry flys, same 5 wt, different line that has not been drowned all day. Having said all of that, I use a fast action 5 because of the wind, it can get pretty brutal and... I will fish big bugs from tim to time, easier with a 6 wt. Would not consider going down with out a 6wt. with a serious back bone, it will save your day. In my most humble opinioin, it is no place for 4 wt. if for no other reason than some of those fish are pretty strong, and it would be just too hard on the fish.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
Another part of my reason for a 5 wt is that i will not fish in the wind.. it's no fun with any rod no matter how good the fishing is.
If i was willing to fish in the wind a 6 wt might be a good choice.
 
Forget the 4wt. I would be squarely on the 5wt train and would not be afraid of using a 6wt. Because of current and presentation. Not the fish. When those fish head for heavy water you gotta be able to put some muscle on them to get them back out of it. It’s not the size or strength of the fish that’s the problem. It’s that big river current
 

jamma

Active Member
Forget the 4wt. I would be squarely on the 5wt train and would not be afraid of using a 6wt. Because of current and presentation. Not the fish. When those fish head for heavy water you gotta be able to put some muscle on them to get them back out of it. It’s not the size or strength of the fish that’s the problem. It’s that big river current
Some of it is living in that current,though.I have seen those fish rising in some pretty heavy water and they have some tails that put other rainbows to shame.
 

gt

Active Member
old Sage 7100 designed for this specific river decades ago. look for one, you won't be sorry. wind is the issue here and there is normally plenty of that.
 

Nooksack Mac

Active Member
What's the difference between a 10-inch trout and a four pound trout? Both are small and weak compared to an angler. Trout aren't chinook salmon or tarpon; we pursue them for other reasons. So we needn't feel ashamed for catching them with huge, brutal six-weights.

And there's always that desert canyon wind, waiting to pounce.
 

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info

Latest posts

Top