pedal powered kayaks

bakerite

Active Member
#1
I"m thinking about upgrading the fleet and these look interesting. I currently spend most of my fishing time in a fat cat, but fish quite a few larger bodies of water where I need more speed! I'm interested in the perception or the native watercraft.
 

cmann886

Active Member
#3
I have only used a rented hobbicraft pedal power. The only downside that ai found was they don’t work well in shallow water. Other than that they are great.

Cal
 
#4
I'm really close to pulling the trigger on either a Hobie pro angler (lot of weight though) or the Hobie i11s inflatable. In really shallow water I believe you can pull up the mirage drive and use the paddles. I've heard good things about the slayers also. I get the feeling the Native slayer might be able to turn tighter corners?
 
#5
Pro Angler is great lots of storage, stable as heck, very customization, but it is heavy. Depending on your use and fitness, you can get a boat that suits your style.
I have both a Native Slayer and a Hobie Revo 13 (pictured). I find I am using the Hobie the most because it is fast and stable.
Exceptionally fast is the Revo 16, but you cannot stand in these boats, so I got a pair of Side kick Amas that I installed behind the seat. If I am fishing Bass or Muskie, or need sight fishing capability, the Amas are perfect, but if I am out on the sound, I will leave them off. It's a perfect combo for me.

 
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#7
Last year Hobie came out with their new mirage 180 pedals which allows one to reverse... no reverse was a complaint of many based on my limited research. Now I really want the new pro angler, just need 3k to drop in my lap!
Trip, note eyeanglers boat is not the pro angler, the pro is much wider and wouldn’t need the outriggers, it’s also more expensive. You can occasionally find decent deals on the Hobies on Craigslist.
 
#8
Last year Hobie came
out with their new mirage 180 pedals which allows one to reverse... no reverse was a complaint of many based on my limited research. Now I really want the new pro angler, just need 3k to drop in my lap!
Trip, note eyeanglers boat is not the pro angler, the pro is much wider and wouldn’t need the outriggers, it’s also more expensive. You can occasionally find decent deals on the Hobies on Craigslist.
I will say my Slayers Propel drive is perfect for tweaking my position, you simply reverse the pedaling, but the propeller drive fouls easily in weeds and pads. The Hobie drive fouls but is significantly easier to keep weed free. I use the reverse in the Hobie a fair amount, but it is definitely not a big deal if you get a boat without it.

The Pro Angler is a fishing machine, but I would not take it out on the open ocean as it is a bit sluggish on the response time. Its perfect habitat is Puget Sound and Lakes.

The Revo offers speed an responsiveness for rough conditions, I like having the option of outriggers or not simply because I fish many different water types.

The Hobie Outback is a fine compromise between the Revo and the Pro Angler. Fast and stable, you can stand and have plenty of storage.

The new Hobie Compass is one of the best boats of the bunch and its at a price point that is way more realistic. They have trimmed some of the bells and whistles, but IMHO, this boat is one of the best values and had a really sweet hull design. Very fast and I can stand up and sight cast easily.
Check out some of the Kayak fishing pages on Facebook and you will get even more info, plus many fully rigged boats are listed for sale at great prices.

On Facebook, check out:
Lower Columbia Kayak Anglers
Seattle Kayak Anglers

Cascadia Kayak Anglers



A friend of mine has a cool YouTube Channel that gives you some idea of what can be done with these boats. He is one of a growing cadre of fishermen that recognize the usefulness of these crazy boats :)
Richard "Polyangler" Wark on You Tube



Drop me a PM if you have any further questions!

Dave
 
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#11
I will say my Slayers Propel drive is perfect for tweaking my position, you simply reverse the pedaling, but the propeller drive fouls easily in weeds and pads. The Hobie drive fouls but is significantly easier to keep weed free. I use the reverse in the Hobie a fair amount, but it is definitely not a big deal if you get a boat without it.

The Pro Angler is a fishing machine, but I would not take it out on the open ocean as it is a bit sluggish on the response time. Its perfect habitat is Puget Sound and Lakes.

The Revo offers speed an responsiveness for rough conditions, I like having the option of outriggers or not simply because I fish many different water types.

The Hobie Outback is a fine compromise between the Revo and the Pro Angler. Fast and stable, you can stand and have plenty of storage.

The new Hobie Compass is one of the best boats of the bunch and its at a price point that is way more realistic. They have trimmed some of the bells and whistles, but IMHO, this boat is one of the best values and had a really sweet hull design. Very fast and I can stand up and sight cast easily.
Check out some of the Kayak fishing pages on Facebook and you will get even more info, plus many fully rigged boats are listed for sale at great prices.

On Facebook, check out:
Lower Columbia Kayak Anglers
Seattle Kayak Anglers

Cascadia Kayak Anglers



A friend of mine has a cool YouTube Channel that gives you some idea of what can be done with these boats. He is one of a growing cadre of fishermen that recognize the usefulness of these crazy boats :)
Richard "Polyangler" Wark on You Tube



Drop me a PM if you have any further questions!

Dave
Thanks for the info Dave, with the costs of these hands on advice from actual users is vital!
 

Tinker

Active Member
#13
For a different opinion, after putting in hundreds of hours in them, I sold off my Hobie's last year and replaced them with paddle-powered kayaks so I could use all that space between the seat and the pedals that you cannot use in a pedal-powered kayak.

Speed may get you to a fishing spot, just like the folks in bass boats, but after that, what good is it? I never found a use for high-speed trolling - I'm never chasing a tuna - and I can maintain 2-3mph trolling for salmon and kokanee all day with a paddle.

If you need to make fine adjustments to your position or direction of drift, turn around within the length of your kayak, or back away from something quickly, you'll have your paddle in your lap all the time, anyway.

Hands-free fishing is over-hyped because one hand is going to be on the tiller at all times. They don't go in the right direction by themselves.

My only pedal-powered experience is with Hobie kayaks and for all the aggravations I found fly-fishing from them, I am still impressed with their build quality. Hobie uses great HDPE for their hulls.

I think a person should understand that for every perceived advantage of pedal-power, there are real drawbacks to overcome, If you can live with the downsides, no question you'll like those kayaks.

The grain of salt in my opinion is that I use my kayaks to fish in the ocean 90 percent of the time and I fish with fly rods 100% of the time, so your mileage may vary in lakes or with conventional gear.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#14
Jeff, I considered them before I finally settled on my Nucanoe Frontier 12. I was leery about using pedal power in the ofttimes shallow & weedy areas I like to fish, plus I like the exercise paddling provides, especially since I work both my arms & legs via my elliptical machine. And like tinker, I prefer having the additional space that pedals would occupy. Since my primary goal was stability versus speed, I opted for the Nucanoe and have been extremely pleased. I also prefer the elevated seats. If you would like to take mine out, you are more than welcome to do that @bakerite .
 
#15
Jeff, I considered them before I finally settled on my Nucanoe Frontier 12. I was leery about using pedal power in the ofttimes shallow & weedy areas I like to fish, plus I like the exercise paddling provides, especially since I work both my arms & legs via my elliptical machine. And like tinker, I prefer having the additional space that pedals would occupy. Since my primary goal was stability versus speed, I opted for the Nucanoe and have been extremely pleased. I also prefer the elevated seats. If you would like to take mine out, you are more than welcome to do that @bakerite .
Jim, do you think it can do Sekiu water?
Thx
 

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