pedal powered kayaks

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#16
Jim, do you think it can do Sekiu water?
Thx
Sorry, Mark but I can't answer that - I have no intimate or otherwise knowledge of Sekui or the water conditions there. I use mine primarily in Columbia River backwaters when covering longer distances. The boat is 12' long & 43" wide - very stable with a shaky old man in it. There are a lot of videos on YouTube & the Nucanoe web site that may help answer your question however.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#18
For a wide boat, it tracks well and is fast enough for me. I have 2 raised seats, which makes for easy casting while still remaining quite stable. I can stand in it using the lean bar, but am not comfortable doing so - as I told my Son: "The boat is incredibly stable; your old Dad, not so much."
 
#19
My whole thing is I want something that is fast (I can get to my musky/pike spots two miles from camp) but stable enough to stand up and sight fish. All the options are good so far except length. They're too long. I need something I can put standing up on the rack behind my trailer, or in the bed if my truck. Like 11' max.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#20
in the bed if my truck. Like 11' max.
I haul my 12' in the 6' bed of my Tacoma - I picked-up a bed extender from Harbor freight for ~$60 (https://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?dir=asc&order=EAScore,f,EAFeatured+Weight,f,Sale+Rank,f&q=truck+bed+extender); it plugs into my receiver hitch, I adjusted it out a bit & adjusted the height of the "T" to suit. My Nucanoe is easy to load/unload & rides very securely with 2 ratchet straps over the boat (1 anchoring it to the "T" and another at the rear bed tie-downs), then 1 more from the tail of the boat back to the front of the truck bed. I had no desire to haul it on a trailer.
 

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#21
I haul my 12' in the 6' bed of my Tacoma - I picked-up a bed extender from Harbor freight for ~$60 (https://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?dir=asc&order=EAScore,f,EAFeatured+Weight,f,Sale+Rank,f&q=truck+bed+extender); it plugs into my receiver hitch, I adjusted it out a bit & adjusted the height of the "T" to suit. My Nucanoe is easy to load/unload & rides very securely with 2 ratchet straps over the boat (1 anchoring it to the "T" and another at the rear bed tie-downs), then 1 more from the tail of the boat back to the front of the truck bed. I had no desire to haul it on a trailer.
I'm hauling a 28' travel trailer behind me. I might be able to put a roof rack on the trailer if the boat is light enough.
 

Freestone

Not to be confused with freestoneangler
#23
I'm hauling a 28' travel trailer behind me. I might be able to put a roof rack on the trailer if the boat is light enough.
I would think about putting some type of rack on your truck before I put one on the trailer (Thule/Yakima have all kinds of options even if you don't have a canopy). That way, you could get whatever kayak you wanted and not be stuck paddling a short, tubby, wide barge. A long kayak will always be more efficient to paddle and faster (if all else is equal). On a large body of water, I would want the most efficient craft possible when the wind comes up.

If you'll be mostly paddling long distances, you could also always go with a longer, bit narrower boat and add outriggers you could deploy when you need the stability for standing up or when the waves really kick up.

I have some outriggers for my canoe and they make it easy to stand. This year, I am also going to try them on my kayak and SUP for extra stability when I cast (apparently, I tend to put my whole body into it!).
 

bakerite

Active Member
#24
Thanks for your replies everyone and your kind offer Jim or should that be Gem! Lots to think about here. I almost bought a Nucanoe a few years ago. Will keep looking after I figure out how much I owe Uncle Sam.
 

holtad

Active Member
#25
I love my 12 ft Native pedal yak, but I was 1 year to early to the party and bought the Mariner model. The Slayer is a significant upgrade in terms of rails, a far better seat, and several other amenities. I keep thinking I'll upgrade at some point but its hard to pull the trigger when I have a perfectly good boat.
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#26
I would think about putting some type of rack on your truck before I put one on the trailer (Thule/Yakima have all kinds of options even if you don't have a canopy). That way, you could get whatever kayak you wanted and not be stuck paddling a short, tubby, wide barge. A long kayak will always be more efficient to paddle and faster (if all else is equal). On a large body of water, I would want the most efficient craft possible when the wind comes up.

If you'll be mostly paddling long distances, you could also always go with a longer, bit narrower boat and add outriggers you could deploy when you need the stability for standing up or when the waves really kick up.

I have some outriggers for my canoe and they make it easy to stand. This year, I am also going to try them on my kayak and SUP for extra stability when I cast (apparently, I tend to put my whole body into it!).
I agree with Freestone. Excessive width, although more stable, isn't the best for paddling. I'm probably going to just buy some of those inflatable amas made by Hobie for my Tarpon 140 (14' SOT). My Tarpon is heavy at around 80# or so with all my add-ons, and requires a cart to transport to water. However, its only about 29" wide, and is too unstable to stand up in for sight fishing. But it paddles fairly well. I have a rudder installed, and a downwind sail rig that I can pop up for a downwind run, and it holds a good running reach.
If I were looking for a new fishing yak for fishing in the Salish Sea, I'd get something foot-powered. My old traditional paddle powered Ultimate 12 is a good size for one person to handle, if I need to carry or cart it to the water's edge. I try to avoid having to paddle it too far, these days.
I might be in the market for an ultralight day-touring yak (not designed for fishing), but first I'll have to see if I can get back in shape to paddle all day. I should know by the end of this Summer.
For inland waters of any size, I might opt for my 12' skiff, if I know that I'll be launching at a boat ramp.
 
#27
I would think about putting some type of rack on your truck before I put one on the trailer (Thule/Yakima have all kinds of options even if you don't have a canopy). That way, you could get whatever kayak you wanted and not be stuck paddling a short, tubby, wide barge. A long kayak will always be more efficient to paddle and faster (if all else is equal). On a large body of water, I would want the most efficient craft possible when the wind comes up.

If you'll be mostly paddling long distances, you could also always go with a longer, bit narrower boat and add outriggers you could deploy when you need the stability for standing up or when the waves really kick up.

I have some outriggers for my canoe and they make it easy to stand. This year, I am also going to try them on my kayak and SUP for extra stability when I cast (apparently, I tend to put my whole body into it!).
Can you add the outriggers after you've reached your destination....that way you're not having to travel with them on?
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#28
Can you add the outriggers after you've reached your destination....that way you're not having to travel with them on?
I saw on a kayak angling forum how a guy launched his yak on a coastal beach through the small shorebreak, and then paddled to his fishing spot, opened his hatch, and pulled out his inflatable amas. He inflated them, quickly attached them to their boom, and was then able to stand and cast. Myself, I would only do that back in the calm waters of the estuaries, or on small waters with no wakes and not much wind chop. When I'm fishing for bottom fish out along the jetty here at the harbor entrance from my Tarpon, wearing a wetsuit, I'm content to remain seated. I used to sometimes hang my legs over the sides for stability when fishing, but now I avoid this if there may be any sea lions around.
A little bulb went on in my memory...I think the curved boom that holds the amas can be rotated 180 degrees, so that the amas are "up" for paddling, then rotated back down for fishing stabilization.
 
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Freestone

Not to be confused with freestoneangler
#29
Can you add the outriggers after you've reached your destination....that way you're not having to travel with them on?
Mark, I have the Spring Creek solid floats. I have an older model but they function the same in that the floats are adjustable in height from the water. The float system can be attached to the boat and the floats can be raised out of the water while paddling and then easily lowered once you get to where you are going. Theoretically, at least on my canoe, I could wait until I was where I wanted to go to put the whole thing on but I would not want to as 1. I might drop an important part and 2. it would be my luck that I would flip over while fiddling with and putting them on, LOL.

https://www.springcreek.com/shop/paddle-sports/

(Note: this company is not Spring Creek Prams so don't call Jim asking for outriggers, LOL.)

Here is a picture getting ready to launch. When I get out to where I want to fish, I will extend the arms and lower the stabilizers. And while this canoe is very stable/wide (~39"), I feel more comfortable standing with the stabilizers. Empty, the canoe only weighs 38lbs, so with the stabilizers, it becomes a sort of ultralight car-toppable pram.

IMG_1845.JPG


Wenonah Fisherman in the UL Kevlar layup
 
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Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#30
Looks like a nice add-on, Freestone.
I still have a low-priority unfinished ama project out in my shop, languishing underneath the dust and detritus accumulated after many moons of benign neglect. Maybe I should blow off the dust and finish what I started, although it kinda resembles a dead end right now...I had started it off semi-realistically dreaming of going big (wild delusions of grandeur)...so that I could rig a decent sail, giving the Hobie Adventure Island a run for its money....now my ideas are drastically downsized into something more reasonable.
 

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