NFR A taste of home

#61
Being from Connecticut, i feel youz North-easterners missing the goodies from home! I love the The downhome cooking in the Southeast (Tn, where my wife is from) but miss real NY style pizza, whole belly fried clams, and good “grinders” (subs, hogies, heros, whatever ya call em)!

Speaking of pizza, some of the best I have ever consumed were made by Greek descendants, not Italian. Non the less, folks up there understand that in order to make a good pie, you need first a well seasoned coal or gas fired Blodgett or old Vulcan oven, capable of temps up to 900*F! Electric convection ovens are incapable of getting just that right amount of ‘char’ to the crust. Real first press olive oil from the old country. Sauce made with certified San Marzano tomatoes. Real, I mean actual Mozzarella cheese made with whole milk, or better, Goats milk. Dough made fresh, hand spun and pie done 5 minutes after you order it! A good pizza needs NO toppings!!! Maybe a shake of garlic, oregano, and/or parm & some crushed red pepper...dats it!


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jamma

Active Member
#62
Remember a comic,don't remember who exactly,who stated"even a bad pizza tastes pretty good".Most of the opinions stated here are from Easterners who moved west.I wonder how that would work in reverse?If someone is willing to fly me back East,I'd love to do a taste test.;)
 
#63
Adding to the pizza conversation, there is a pizza place in Olympia that I think has come closest to the New York style pizza. The owners actually went back to NYC to learn how to make it.
 

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#65
Remember a comic,don't remember who exactly,who stated"even a bad pizza tastes pretty good".Most of the opinions stated here are from Easterners who moved west.I wonder how that would work in reverse?If someone is willing to fly me back East,I'd love to do a taste test.;)
I've done it. What's funny is I don't compare them to which is better. West coast pizza is similar to an Italian calzone that wasn't folded and sealed. I've had West coast, Chicago, East coast, and real pizza in Italy. All are different. It seems that farther west you go the more stuff they put on it. There were a couple Italian restaurants here that made authentic Italian pizza. Including they imported tomatoes and meats from Italy. One of the shops were owned by actually Italians from Italy (not descendants). Again, different beast than East coast. @Freestone funny I was going to say that East coast pizza was simplistic. More in quality than quantity. But same goes for most pizza in Italy. It's even more simplistic than East coast pizza.

Again I just loved traveling the world. I always went away from national chains and ate local. How I developed my BBQ that a lot of you enjoy. I took a mix of what I learned traveling to Texas, Memphis, Kansas, and the Carolinas and mixed it up to create what I eat.

I think the biggest problem is we have such a smorgasbord of cultures here, we're overly diluted. Not in a bad way, just that the influences are so diverse for being such a young area, we don't have the set traditions like you'll see in the Italian, Irish, German, etc communities that have been in existence over there before we were even a territory.
 

jamma

Active Member
#66
I've done it. What's funny is I don't compare them to which is better. West coast pizza is similar to an Italian calzone that wasn't folded and sealed. I've had West coast, Chicago, East coast, and real pizza in Italy. All are different. It seems that farther west you go the more stuff they put on it. There were a couple Italian restaurants here that made authentic Italian pizza. Including they imported tomatoes and meats from Italy. One of the shops were owned by actually Italians from Italy (not descendants). Again, different beast than East coast. @Freestone funny I was going to say that East coast pizza was simplistic. More in quality than quantity. But same goes for most pizza in Italy. It's even more simplistic than East coast pizza.

Again I just loved traveling the world. I always went away from national chains and ate local. How I developed my BBQ that a lot of you enjoy. I took a mix of what I learned traveling to Texas, Memphis, Kansas, and the Carolinas and mixed it up to create what I eat.

I think the biggest problem is we have such a smorgasbord of cultures here, we're overly diluted. Not in a bad way, just that the influences are so diverse for being such a young area, we don't have the set traditions like you'll see in the Italian, Irish, German, etc communities that have been in existence over there before we were even a territory.
I would also like to try an authentic Philly cheesesteak as I really like them.This all rather reminds me of the M*A*S*H episode about Hawkeye's obsession for Adam's Ribs from Chicago.
 

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#68
I would also like to try an authentic Philly cheesesteak as I really like them.This all rather reminds me of the M*A*S*H episode about Hawkeye's obsession for Adam's Ribs from Chicago.
Never had those when I had visited Chicago. Is it really a place? I know sometimes they make up things for a show.

Philly cheese steak in Philly is indescribable outside of pure heaven. I know I tried a couple versions in Philly. They were all good. My ex had friends in New Jersey, so I'd make the 2 hour drive to explore some history and eat every time we flew there. Which was often.
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#69
Adding to the pizza conversation, there is a pizza place in Olympia that I think has come closest to the New York style pizza. The owners actually went back to NYC to learn how to make it.
What place is that? I'd like to try it.

My favorite pizza is a deluxe combo - everything but anchovies and pineapple. All the meat and all the veggies, on thin crust, I gotta' watch my carbs.
 

jasmillo

Active Member
#70
Being from Connecticut, i feel youz North-easterners missing the goodies from home! I love the The downhome cooking in the Southeast (Tn, where my wife is from) but miss real NY style pizza, whole belly fried clams, and good “grinders” (subs, hogies, heros, whatever ya call em)!

Speaking of pizza, some of the best I have ever consumed were made by Greek descendants, not Italian. Non the less, folks up there understand that in order to make a good pie, you need first a well seasoned coal or gas fired Blodgett or old Vulcan oven, capable of temps up to 900*F! Electric convection ovens are incapable of getting just that right amount of ‘char’ to the crust. Real first press olive oil from the old country. Sauce made with certified San Marzano tomatoes. Real, I mean actual Mozzarella cheese made with whole milk, or better, Goats milk. Dough made fresh, hand spun and pie done 5 minutes after you order it! A good pizza needs NO toppings!!! Maybe a shake of garlic, oregano, and/or parm & some crushed red pepper...dats it!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I agree! I am from CT and love the pizza from the Greek places you seem to find in every strip mall in the state. I can rattle off a ton of those spots.

Besides my family, the pizza, the grinders (that is what they should be called!) and the Farmington River, I don’t miss much else about the state though....
 
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#71
TJ, first off, welcome to Washington. Now if you are missing some eastern potato chips, that is just because you have not tried Tim's Cascade Potato Chips. There is nothing better. Word is that he started in Renton with a recipe of thick chips home cooked in peanut oil and he took them to parties or pot luck dinners. It became a cottage industry and then a giant success story. I believe he has sold his business but the chips are made the same. Every store, truck stop or mini mart has them in a multitude of flavors.

The scrapple sounds good. You also need to get to a Mariners game and eat some garlic fries. Amazing
 

TJ Fisher

Active Member
#72
Thank you! I'll have to give the chips a try, as for the Mariners game I'm not a baseball fan. Been to 1 game with my grandpa years ago, Pittsburg pirates and I think I slept thru most of it.

Football? Go Ravens!
 

jamma

Active Member
#73
Never had those when I had visited Chicago. Is it really a place? I know sometimes they make up things for a show.

Philly cheese steak in Philly is indescribable outside of pure heaven. I know I tried a couple versions in Philly. They were all good. My ex had friends in New Jersey, so I'd make the 2 hour drive to explore some history and eat every time we flew there. Which was often.
I don't know.The time frame for the show was the fifties so perhaps there was an Adams.I do know that the writers for the show drew from their experiences serving in that war,so it's a possibility.Was just referring to their ordering takeout from halfway around the world.
Portland has a healthy food/restaurant culture with many transplants serving home style cooking,esp. pizza.Might be worth checking out.
 
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Skip Enge

Active Member
Staff member
#75
Remember a comic,don't remember who exactly,who stated"even a bad pizza tastes pretty good".Most of the opinions stated here are from Easterners who moved west.I wonder how that would work in reverse?If someone is willing to fly me back East,I'd love to do a taste test.;)
I wouldn't trust this guys taster...he thinks fish all taste the same...;)...it's an ongoing discussion.