Spey Rod for Beginner

#1
I am looking to purchase the IMX Pro Short Spey in the 6 WT or 7 WT , I am also considering the Echo 3 Spey Rods in the 6127 or 7130 for fishing in September and October Alaskan Rainbows in the 24” to 31” class on the NakNek River and other rivers in Alaska throwing large flies. I have no idea how to spey cast and hoping to learn between now and the my trip to AK at the end of September. Which rod do you think would be easier to learn on? Which would be the better rod?
 
#2
I haven't cast either, but I have cast the Echo 3 8110 and Echo 3 8134. I am not an expert or a great caster, but I have enjoyed both of those rods.
 

4sallypat

Active Member
#3
The G Loomis IMX Pro short spey are great rods that are very capable to cast many different lines of varying weights. Price point is higher. I test casted the IMX and loved how much lighter in hand the rods are and how they can cast way more types of lines at a wide range of weights.
I'm a G Loomis fan now that I have a short trout switch rod and a 15' spey rod that casts so sweet from SH to Mid belly lines and everything in between.

The Echo 3 spey is a moderately priced rod $100 less than the IMX that has great backbone. If you compare the shorter Echo 3 rods (11') against the short spey, they are very comparable as they are switch rods. But the 13' rod is a spey rod and will have different tip action..

If you are a beginner, I would suggest the Redington Chromer - casts like a laser, shorter 11' and 12' versions as well as spey lengths, and they are priced at $400...
 

Bjorn

Active Member
#4
From my own experience I found the shorter rods difficult to cast, others will no doubt disagree. I have a 7130 and casting that rod is coming along fine-I am still a beginner. The 7130 is great for big flies; but not stiff enough for heavier weighted flies-IMO. The eight weight-works wonderfully for those. I found that spey casting lessons were essential for me, you may feel differently. Please post some pics from the Naknek!
 
#5
I am looking to purchase the IMX Pro Short Spey in the 6 WT or 7 WT , I am also considering the Echo 3 Spey Rods in the 6127 or 7130 for fishing in September and October Alaskan Rainbows in the 24” to 31” class on the NakNek River and other rivers in Alaska throwing large flies. I have no idea how to spey cast and hoping to learn between now and the my trip to AK at the end of September. Which rod do you think would be easier to learn on? Which would be the better rod?
The 13ft rod is going to be the easiest to learn speycasting for a beginner of the rods you mentioned. Once you get a handle on the cast you can pick up a 9ft 5wt and make all the casts single handed if you like.
Alot of casters make the mistake of going ultra short on two handed rods thinking it will be easier, its not. Timing is more precise even with all the short heavy skagit type lines available now. Pick a rod in the 12 1/2ft to 13ft range and learn to cast. Find a head thats in the 40 to 45ft range thats capable of turning over a moderate sinktip and can also be used as a floating head for summer and also practice casting. Your going to need some practice. You should be good to go for your trip up north in the fall.
 

the_grube

Active Member
#6
I'm relatively new to spey casting; started winter season of 2016. I agree with Brian, and Bjorn the smaller spey rods (3-5 wt) are harder to cast on than the 7wts and up. The smaller rods take discipline to keep things inside the box, and better timing. You might consider an inexpensive 7130 or 8130, get the basic moves down, then buy an inexpensive trout spey. You could probably find both those pieces on this board for around the price of one new rod.

That said, I wouldn't get too wrapped around the axle over finding a rod that is just right for you. At this point, you don't really know what you like or want in a spey rod action or feel. I think it's more imortant to learn what a 'successful' spey cast feels and looks like with any gear. If you're set on buying new, go to a reputable shop, tell them how you want to fish with it. You'll wind up with a matched rod and line. Then fish and practice your brains out with it. Doesn't matter what gear you buy if you don't get it wet at least twice a week for a few months.

Most of all, have fun, enjoy the process and be safe. Start w/o a hook until you have high confidence in your ability to keep the fly away from your body.
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#7
A 7 wt rod about 13' long is an excellent choice for the Naknek River. It handles the heavy rabbit fur streamers, either leech or flesh fly patterns, usually weighted or with cone heads, quite well. And it might be windy. I fished my CND Solstice, a 7 wt at 13' 4", and it suited me well for that fishery. Hmmm, been thinking about doing it again.

Sg
 
#9
I also just started spey casting and the learning process is really fun. I have an 13'6'' 8 wt and a 11'3'' 3 wt. I don't know enough about my cast as to whether they are the wrong rods or not....but I know that a lesson really helps and the type of line is just as important as the rod. When you nail a nice cast it's the same feeling as hitting the sweet spot of 5 iron. Right now I'm having fun stringing up different lines on spare spools for different types of fishing. A floating vs intermediate, floating leader vs sink tips...it's all fun. I especially like that spey casting is so efficient...strip and cast....strip and cast.
Have fun! My local fly shop was a lot of help.
 

4sallypat

Active Member
#10
I also just started spey casting and the learning process is really fun. I have an 13'6'' 8 wt and a 11'3'' 3 wt. I don't know enough about my cast as to whether they are the wrong rods or not....but I know that a lesson really helps and the type of line is just as important as the rod. When you nail a nice cast it's the same feeling as hitting the sweet spot of 5 iron. Right now I'm having fun stringing up different lines on spare spools for different types of fishing. A floating vs intermediate, floating leader vs sink tips...it's all fun. I especially like that spey casting is so efficient...strip and cast....strip and cast.
Have fun! My local fly shop was a lot of help.
^^^ yes this is so true!
Well you are certainly ready to fish for big winter steelies and small trout!
A good choice of rods to keep you busy all year!
 

longstick

Active Member
#12
If you get the IMXPro for Nanek,get the 71111 it will handle any bow on that river. As for as calling it a switch... it is not a switch. This rod is horrible at single hand casting or tossing indicators. It is a progressive action with a stiffer tip. A true switch rod is a fast action with a softer tip. Also the old theory of go long because it’s easy to learn on was true 7 Plus years ago. Now that we have a variety of lines that match rods better then ever that is not a true statement with today’s short speys. Decide on the rod that works best for you. I just got done doing a Spey Clave today and more casters were liking all company’s shorter speys sub 12.5 ft due to easy on body and learning curve. Come to one of the shops casting days and try everything out.
Recap for ak bows go with a 7wt Spey from 1111 to 13 ft and you will be dialed.
 

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