Two Rod Endorsement?

#16
I stopped using the straps as the were just a total pain. However I did have a fish while chironomid fishing two years ago rocket towards me and dive which brought my line between it and the rod tip in contact with the reel on my second rod which caused it to flip upwards in the holder and fall into 22 feet of water. Luckily I had it pegged shallower than that and the sunk rod dragged my indicator to me and after I dealt with the fish I grabbed it and retrieved my leader, 90 feet of line and 100 yards of backing which created a hell of a mess to sort out. Touch wood...that's the only problem I've had not using the straps on the Scotty rod holders.
 
#18
This is the first year ill really be fishing 2 rods from my tube. I got one set up for bobbers and the other has the business half of an 8wt sa streamer express on a old fenwick glass 6wt for when im kicking from spot to spot. not ever gonna fish them at the same time though.
 
Likes: JS

skyrise

Active Member
#21
2 rods for me all the time. One in the rod holder and the other in my hand from my tube. Like to play with various sink/floating lines during the day.
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#22
I guess I should chime in, seeing how I feel a bit naked if I'm not fishing two rods, it feels a bit like I've lost my child at the mall. In my head I know that they are most likely fine, but there is still that little bit of panic.

I fish a variety of combinations with two rods.

When trolling, I'll fish two different lines and patterns to test different zones. 5-7, 5-Intermediate, Intermediate-Floater, etc...

Last Summer at an Eastern Washington lake, I found that my type 7 on a mid speed troll, just plain out fished the type 5. I switched patterns, but the type 7 kept producing. I slowed my troll thinking that my type 5 would drop down into the zone, but then I think the speed wasn't right and I stopped hitting fish. This is not something I would have discovered just fishing the 5.

In the scenario above, when I dialed in the area the fish were concentrated, I anchored and set an indicator where I thought the fish were cruising. My top and bottom fly were set about 3 1/2 feet apart to work a couple of different zones. I then casted out my type 5 and work a count down method to where I thought the fish were based on my trolling. It took a bit of experimenting, but after a few different counts I hooked a fish. They were deeper than I thought, and that allowed me to move my indicator rig down. Sure enough the indicator started finding some love as well. Again not something I would have easily discovered if I hadn't been fishing two rods. The problem with this though is once the indicator started working, I would have to set the full sink down to set the hook on the indicator. That ruins a count down every time. I will take that problem every stinking time.

So once the indicator is dialed in, it really does make sense to throw to indicators. You may not know this about me, but I reallllllllly like looking at indicators. For some this becomes difficult because it is hard to keep your line tight to the indicator if you are only working one indicator at a time. It always seems to be the indicator on the rod you are not holding at the time. The way to fix this problem is to work both rods at the same time. I've taught myself to finger twist retrieve with both hands and I can hold both rods and work both lines in at the same time. @troutpocket calls this "Ira on point.", I won't share with you what his buddy calls it when I do this and I'm catching a bunch of fish, something like "Slick...."

I love fishing two indicators, but I'm not at all opposed to throwing one indicator and one other type of line depending on my depth when things are moving slowly. I like to stay busy but honestly this method seriously cuts into my beverage time, so sometimes I just have to settle for the indicator/let the other line lay on the bottom technique. Funny enough, this method has worked on several occasions, one particularly interesting stretch out at Lone where the fish were taking bloodworms right off the bottom. I left an intermediate out after trolling into an area and setting up an indicator. After a few take downs something started rattling in the bottom of the boat. I managed to grab my intermediate rod before it sailed over. After landing that fish I casted the intermediate back out and the scenario played itself out several more times that day. A few fish under the indicator, grab the intermediate, rinse, repeat. At some point it dawned on me that the fish must be digging right down onto the bottom in order to find that fly. I dropped my indicator down and even though the action before that had been steady, after that it was non stop. Knowledge, even accidentally acquired while fishing two rods is knowledge none the less.

So yeah, I think two rods are worth it and manageable. But as mentioned before, I fish out of a boat and not out of a pontoon or belly boat. If I did, I might have to only bring 4 rods versus 7 or 8 out with me on the water.
 
#23
Bobber on one, Dry, Dry/Dropper on the other, no better way to dial it in!!! Nothing like watching the bobber go down, then a something slash at a giant Chernobyl or other obnoxious offering on top!
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#24
I guess I should chime in, seeing how I feel a bit naked if I'm not fishing two rods, it feels a bit like I've lost my child at the mall. In my head I know that they are most likely fine, but there is still that little bit of panic.

I fish a variety of combinations with two rods.

When trolling, I'll fish two different lines and patterns to test different zones. 5-7, 5-Intermediate, Intermediate-Floater, etc...

Last Summer at an Eastern Washington lake, I found that my type 7 on a mid speed troll, just plain out fished the type 5. I switched patterns, but the type 7 kept producing. I slowed my troll thinking that my type 5 would drop down into the zone, but then I think the speed wasn't right and I stopped hitting fish. This is not something I would have discovered just fishing the 5.

In the scenario above, when I dialed in the area the fish were concentrated, I anchored and set an indicator where I thought the fish were cruising. My top and bottom fly were set about 3 1/2 feet apart to work a couple of different zones. I then casted out my type 5 and work a count down method to where I thought the fish were based on my trolling. It took a bit of experimenting, but after a few different counts I hooked a fish. They were deeper than I thought, and that allowed me to move my indicator rig down. Sure enough the indicator started finding some love as well. Again not something I would have easily discovered if I hadn't been fishing two rods. The problem with this though is once the indicator started working, I would have to set the full sink down to set the hook on the indicator. That ruins a count down every time. I will take that problem every stinking time.

So once the indicator is dialed in, it really does make sense to throw to indicators. You may not know this about me, but I reallllllllly like looking at indicators. For some this becomes difficult because it is hard to keep your line tight to the indicator if you are only working one indicator at a time. It always seems to be the indicator on the rod you are not holding at the time. The way to fix this problem is to work both rods at the same time. I've taught myself to finger twist retrieve with both hands and I can hold both rods and work both lines in at the same time. @troutpocket calls this "Ira on point.", I won't share with you what his buddy calls it when I do this and I'm catching a bunch of fish, something like "Slick...."

I love fishing two indicators, but I'm not at all opposed to throwing one indicator and one other type of line depending on my depth when things are moving slowly. I like to stay busy but honestly this method seriously cuts into my beverage time, so sometimes I just have to settle for the indicator/let the other line lay on the bottom technique. Funny enough, this method has worked on several occasions, one particularly interesting stretch out at Lone where the fish were taking bloodworms right off the bottom. I left an intermediate out after trolling into an area and setting up an indicator. After a few take downs something started rattling in the bottom of the boat. I managed to grab my intermediate rod before it sailed over. After landing that fish I casted the intermediate back out and the scenario played itself out several more times that day. A few fish under the indicator, grab the intermediate, rinse, repeat. At some point it dawned on me that the fish must be digging right down onto the bottom in order to find that fly. I dropped my indicator down and even though the action before that had been steady, after that it was non stop. Knowledge, even accidentally acquired while fishing two rods is knowledge none the less.

So yeah, I think two rods are worth it and manageable. But as mentioned before, I fish out of a boat and not out of a pontoon or belly boat. If I did, I might have to only bring 4 rods versus 7 or 8 out with me on the water.
Hey, Slick! When you and @troutpocket are in a boat together and you both take your quota of 7 or 8 rods (each, right), that's a lot of graphite!
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
#25
My last excursion with two indicator rods brought me to a new game plan. I use ten foot rods and a pontoon boat. I drop one anchor out the back and keep position with fins. I was in thirty feet and just used thirty some feet of leader 8# fluoro. Hard to cast? Don't know. I didn't bother trying. I just fished with the bobber right under the rod tip.
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#26
My last excursion with two indicator rods brought me to a new game plan. I use ten foot rods and a pontoon boat. I drop one anchor out the back and keep position with fins. I was in thirty feet and just used thirty some feet of leader 8# fluoro. Hard to cast? Don't know. I didn't bother trying. I just fished with the bobber right under the rod tip.
That can work, but it can also be casted and ultimately in the right conditions can be more effective. With the correct winds, the indicator works better casted out and allowed to drift or when worked back slowly. No wind at all, you should use a full sink at that depth and work it slowly up and then let it back down. Both of these methods seriously interfere with beverage drinking though. Go ugly early and you won't need to worry about it.
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
#27
Boy howdy!
I decided to eliminate the large right angle geometry of the hook set and go with the sinking line style of hook set without the sinking line. :) Less line handling, less casting, less time with the fly out of the water, more catching.

I have yet to conquer the two fish at once thing...but it may involve a couple of old automatic reels from my collection.
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#28
Boy howdy!
I decided to eliminate the large right angle geometry of the hook set and go with the sinking line style of hook set without the sinking line. :) Less line handling, less casting, less time with the fly out of the water, more catching.

I have yet to conquer the two fish at once thing...but it may involve a couple of old automatic reels from my collection.
You also forgot to mention that you will now be able to concentrate on the other important things, like beverages.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#29
One other rather lovely and frequent occurrence when you're anchored and fishing two "poles" with indicators is the "shift". That would be the wind shift. Best not to fight it or get angry, just deal with it. Almost a guarantee that once you're set and settled down with your beverage of choice, the "W" will shift and you're going to have to reposition as your indicators drift back at you. Reposition: That's pulling anchors, reeling in one of your lines, rowing or kicking to the lee side of the shoal, resetting anchors and recasting both rigs before your beverage spills, gets too warm (or too cold).......... fun and games. On my favorite BC lake this shift can happen four or five times an hour! :rolleyes:
 
#30
I don't like fishing with more than one rod. I have a hard enough time concentrating on one rod, especially on a nice day with lots of birds around!

But I usually carry two or sometimes three rods, one set up with an indicator, one with a sinking line, and one with a floating line and a dry fly. Sometimes a hatch on the surface lasts only a brief time, so it's nice to be ready. I use a short 7 or 7-1/2' bamboo rod for the dry fly setup, because it's easy to carry, won't tangle as much with a longer rod, and you usually don't have to cast that far.

I like the Scotty rod holders. The Caddis rod holder works well with up-locking reel seats, but not with the down-locking reel seats that I put on many of my bamboo rods. The gap is too big, and there isn't enough rod below the reel seat to hold.

Tom
 

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