float tube waders

#1
I would like to save some wear on my breathable waders. I see these hodgman gamewade packable waders for fifteen dollars. They are .25 mm pvc construction. I wont be hiking in them, just kicking around in the float tube. They weigh one pound, pack down small, should be easy to patch, and, of course, only FIFTEEN DOLLARS. Does anyone have any experience with these, something similar, or another solution to the same problem?
 
#2
I think if I was to get waders just for float tubing (which i do plan to get evetually) I will go with thick (7mm?) neoprene boot foots. but 15 bucks for a pair of waders is pretty much unbeatable.
 
#3
Yes, I may miss the neoprene. I have wet wading socks I could add over or under. I have a cheap pair of water shoes for getting in and out of the tube at shore. Maybe pick up those simms zip up booties? I would wear wool socks and fleece pants under them just like the breathables. Fifteen dollars sure does sound good at first glance, but would a hundred dollar pair of breathables last longer, and be less trouble than 6 pair of these? I guess my main question is durability. If they tear apart at the crotch the first time you bend over in them, like the cheap pvc rainwear they give you at construction sites, that's a tough patch.
Comfort is another concern. In my tube, my rear end is in the water. I think breathables don't really breathe while submerged, so it should be close to a wash there.
You know, this is about as far away as you can get from a dreadful financial decision if it goes bad. I would still like to hear anyones thoughts, but I should probably just pick them up and report back myself.
 

racermo

Active Member
#4
Neoprene all the way. Stocking foot with neoprene zip up booties that have a thin rubber sole. They keep my knees, feet, and rear warm enough so I don't have to trouble with fleece pants or thermal undies. The only things I don't like are the weight when I'm packing a tube to a lake or having to take a leak. These days they're not too expensive either.
 
#5
Those waders sound like a worthwhile experiment. But in my opinion nothing points out problems in waders like a bellyboat, cuz they are fully underwater for so long. I've had teeny leaks in one toe and, over the course of a day, had water slowly fill that leg, then drip down the other side to slowly fill the other one.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#6
My Redington breathables have lasted much longer while float-tubing than any of the neo waders I've used over the years and without being plagued by annoying seam leaks in the crotch & foot areas. My thought is that the breathable material "slides" more easily than the skin of neoprene material saving wear/weakening of seams.
 

nailbender

Active Member
#7
My son has a pair of these hip waders he bought for hunting after packing a dear off an island in a nearly frozen river. He hasn't ever used them, but the construction and quality look about the same as a beach ball or pool toy.
 

Richard E

Active Member
#8
I would like to save some wear on my breathable waders. I see these hodgman gamewade packable waders for fifteen dollars. They are .25 mm pvc construction. I wont be hiking in them, just kicking around in the float tube. They weigh one pound, pack down small, should be easy to patch, and, of course, only FIFTEEN DOLLARS. Does anyone have any experience with these, something similar, or another solution to the same problem?
Buy the best you can buy, and get the crying over with. Consider how much materials and labor one can get really get for 15 dollars. This forum has plenty of posts of folks looking for waders that keep them dry and last. I surely wouldn’t rely on these to keep me dry or last. If you get them, I would ensure the seller has a generous return policy...
 

Richard E

Active Member
#10
My Redington breathables have lasted much longer while float-tubing than any of the neo waders I've used over the years and without being plagued by annoying seam leaks in the crotch & foot areas. My thought is that the breathable material "slides" more easily than the skin of neoprene material saving wear/weakening of seams.
Which Redington waders did you get?
 
#13
Thank you for all the replies. I have almost completely gotten this idea out of my head. These are made of exactly the same material as cheap construction rainwear. The problem is it does not stretch at all. That is why it explosively tears. I believe another problem is the feet. Neoprene booties seem to be for more than just keeping your feet warm. I believe the neoprene makes a more durable sock like material (stretch and give as well as better abrasion resistance).
So in trying to parse out a way to save some wear on my breathables, I decided on looking for something not breathable for float tubing because I believe breathables don't breathe submerged. I nixed neoprene, rubber/vinyl, or canvas because I still wanted lightweight. I do hike the tube most times. I guess I was hoping there was a lightweight, non breathable. durable, inexpensive material that waders are made of. I felt the cost was all in the breathability.
 
#14
I will just pick up a pair of redington crosswaters. They should be light enough, the price is right, and they can serve as a back up or vice versa. A pair of jeans is 50 dollars these days, 100 for waders is not bad at all.
 
#15
Thank you for all the replies. I have almost completely gotten this idea out of my head. These are made of exactly the same material as cheap construction rainwear. The problem is it does not stretch at all. That is why it explosively tears. I believe another problem is the feet. Neoprene booties seem to be for more than just keeping your feet warm. I believe the neoprene makes a more durable sock like material (stretch and give as well as better abrasion resistance).
So in trying to parse out a way to save some wear on my breathables, I decided on looking for something not breathable for float tubing because I believe breathables don't breathe submerged. I nixed neoprene, rubber/vinyl, or canvas because I still wanted lightweight. I do hike the tube most times. I guess I was hoping there was a lightweight, non breathable. durable, inexpensive material that waders are made of. I felt the cost was all in the breathability.
patagonia actually has awesome new pack waders but not at a budget price. i think you made a good choice going with the reddingtons over the beach ball waders. carry UV aquaseal in the pouch for emergency repairs of leaking seems or pinholes from hooks or thorns and dont overthink it. its time to fish!
 

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