Steelhead vs. Trout

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
#16
As a technical write up, it will lead to a lot of misinformed readers. Steelhead and rainbows are not sub-species of mykiss, they are mykiss. And "rainbow" trout can tolerate salt water quite well, as opposed to what the article claims. My suggestion would be that people not read it, assuming they prefer being better informed.
Wow! I read the thing as some kind of joke! Do you think he's really serious?
 

o mykiss

Active Member
#18
I definitely feel a lot dumber after reading that.

Not sure what you guys were expecting from Flylords given that it appears to be a bunch of college kids from places where there are no real steelhead.
 
Likes: JS

Cruik

Active Member
#19
Actually, I recall that record saltwater 42 pound Steelhead was sterile and had under-developed ability for gonad development..so it was not much different than, or a "natural" Triploid, and the reason it was just living it's life out in saltwater-no urge to spawn..just eat. Probably been more than a few huge salmon and steelhead who did the same. Never trying to come back in to spawn and kept ballooning at sea.
That was my understanding as well, though I also seem to recall reading that the fish had a head wound to the pituitary (do fish have those?) that caused the fish not to "get the urge."

Also, calling the Hoh fish the record is pretty disappointing. Even for that site. I don't think many actual steelheaders give a damn about the IGFA, and would probably consider the pursuit of technical line class records to be pretty antithetical to steelhead fishing. Other than the Bell Island freak fish, the real "record" is contested and hopefully always will be. It's way more fun that the "biggest steelhead" is the subject of stories, debates, dubious photos, and formulas, not officially certified scales. I think calling the Hoh fish the record shows a complete ignorance for steelhead culture.

But it's not just because official measurements aren't fun; that Hoh fish isn't even in the ballpark.
 
#22
I believe that the world record steelhead caught in the salt in SE Alaska by a kid fishing for salmon; the fish was later identified as a steelhead at the taxidermist. If memory serves the fished weight 42#. There has been rainbows (land locked fish) caught that were larger than that record steelhead.

The guys name is David White. He caught it mooching herring from a rubber raft. I believe it was off the mouth of the Kenai. He was my neighbor I remember seeing the mount when I was a kid.

His dad was a dentist with a boat and he would cruise to the native villages to work on their teeth every summer.

Curt
 

Preston

Active Member
#23
Bullshit for the most part. The rainbow trout and the steelhead are, essentially, the same fish: Oncorhynchus mykiss. There are two recognized subspecies, O. mykiss irideus and O. mykiss gairdneri; respectively, the coastal and the interior rainbow subspecies. Both subspecies are capable of adopting a resident or anadromous lifestyle. Both resident and anadromous forms are capable of breeding together and the offspring produced also may choose to adopt either life history. Whether or not these offspring choose to go to sea or to remain in their natal rivers is largely a matter of environmental conditions. There are no "steelhead" or "resident rainbow" subspecies.
 

skyrise

Active Member
#24
Some years ago there was a post on Pisctorial pursuits I think of a picture from a commercial boat up north with a guy holding a 50 pound Steelhead. And a few replies from commercial guys stating that it was not uncommon to haul up very large Steelhead when they were out salmon fishing. Isn’t it the norm for far north Steelhead to spend more time as resident smolt and more time spent at sea as well?
 

Gyrfalcon2015

Wild Trout forever
#26
Here is 2 40# fish from the Skeena test fishery, these are probably the 2 fish I was thinking of.
swe4.jpg

Big, beautiful fish!...but
have seen a lot of 30, 40 and a few 50+ pound salmon, those are not 40 pound steelhead IMHO

even if you go by the stats, they formulate out under:




Not bigger than this 34 pounder

34444.jpg
 
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bk paige

Wishin I was on the Sauk
#27
Other calculators have them up to 43#. Everyone comes up with their onw formula to justify their needs. These fish where weighed, by the way and the are not salmon and carry their shape and weight different.
I too have seen 30 and 40 pound salmon but I sure wish I could see a 40 pound steelhead
 

Gyrfalcon2015

Wild Trout forever
#29
Other calculators have them up to 43#. Everyone comes up with their onw formula to justify their needs. These fish where weighed, by the way and the are not salmon and carry their shape and weight different.
I too have seen 30 and 40 pound salmon but I sure wish I could see a 40 pound steelhead
It really does not matter to me, but I have seen enough fish in 40 years+ on the rivers and unless that guy is a BIG dude, 6'7"+..
I've seen a few out of the Quinault in that 43-44' range that weighed out in the mid 30's-from hatchery workers on the reservation-weighed and measured (from photos).

I just think that since most know how big and rare a 30 pound steelhead is, that when 40 or even 50 pound numbers get thrown around for Steelhead..I get pretty much go into eye-rolling mode.

But, more power to anyone who wants to call them what they want, agreed-love to see a legit 40 pound steelhead in person !
 
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