Sea-Run Cutthroat Trout rules.

#76
I love nymphing in the Sound. Catch lots of SRC that way. Have done it a long time. Really crushes mature coho as well. I’ve had trouble from beaches but from the boat it can be much more productive than stripping flies. I’m sure it works from the beach just as well, I just always had problems with backcast and losing my second fly on the beach behind me. From the boat it’s just like any other nymphing. I like to use a worm pattern and egg pattern combo. Of course the egg seems out of place but they eat it a bunch.
 

miyawaki

Active Member
#78
. . . I’ve had trouble from beaches but from the boat it can be much more productive than stripping flies. I’m sure it works from the beach just as well, I just always had problems with backcast and losing my second fly on the beach behind me . . .
Yes David D., "What about a "single barbless hook and no bait" rule for sea-run cutthroat trout fishing?"

Leland.
 
#79
In the summer we fish for coho outside and inside the kelp lines. I’ve done this from friends boats and my own boat for some time now. During this time of year it’s not uncommon for us to be fishing in 30’ feet of water. Particularly in 2017 we caught SRCs. In fact they were some of the biggest trout I saw last year. Took a bright pink/chartreuse steelhead nymph which was under the same pattern with reverse colors. Both barbless hooks. Really trying for coho. Caught a good few SRC in the same area which makes sense as much bait was concentrated in MA 11&13 that we caught big coho, big blackmouth (+legal), cutts, perch in the same area under and around the same schools of fish. All fish were caught within 20’ of the surface and released with minimal handling except for the coho we kept and I think my buddy kept one of the big blackmouth. A few years back I was in a friends boat and we were checked pink fishing at browns/dash while stripping 2 flies. 2 officers in a boat had been watching multiple boats in the area (I’m sure you can imagine that there were many) and we were 1 of a few boats they checked. They looked at our rigs and had nothing bad to say.
 
#82
You can get a couple casting bubbles then just use your flies behind it. That way you can just take your fly box and no need to buy lures.
Bubbles can be ok in some fisheries for spin fisherman to use flies, but I don't think our fishery is one of them. No way you could fish the right depth or presentation with a bubble IMO. Best bet might be a little spoon or something with a bucktail hoochie tied on a single point hook. Then I can still feel like I'm tying flies. :D
 
#83
Bubbles can be ok in some fisheries for spin fisherman to use flies, but I don't think our fishery is one of them. No way you could fish the right depth or presentation with a bubble IMO. Best bet might be a little spoon or something with a bucktail hoochie tied on a single point hook. Then I can still feel like I'm tying flies. :D
They work just fine in our fishery, sure an intermediate line is preferred, but we've all caught plenty of fish on a floater. Guys fish this setup a ton for area 13 coho

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 
#85
Emphasizing a point I made earlier about resident fish spawning with steelhead, and why ALL native trout should be CnR statewide....
I just was listening to one of April Vokey's podcasts where she interviews John McMillan,(
)and he describes a wealth of information regarding these resident fish, with some noticeable points:
-Some years (on some river systems), 50% of the returning steelhead were offspring of a resident rainbow trout, typically males spawning with mature female steelhead
-Many females, especially late in the spring, find no adult males to spawn with, so resident fish fill the gap
-Resident trout play increasingly viable roles in increasing the gene pool and diversity of steelhead
-Resident "steelhead" that occur in some rivers can produce just as many, if not more eggs than returning female steelhead over the course of their lives

Seems like pretty compelling evidence to me...
 
#88
I strongly believe that the biggest harm to SRC comes from commercial netting particularly in the Hood Canal area. Focusing on increasing net sizes and implementing beach buffer zones would have much greater impact on SRC protection than a recreational fishery closure of any kind at least at this present time.
I don't believe this is the case. I fished commercially in Puget Sound for 30+ yrs and can recall one or two Searuns I saw in that time. One reason is the depth of the nets, you can't get close enough to the beach with a seine net where cutthroat travel to get them. And another is the gill nets used during the chum fishery are 5.5"+ mesh nets, which cutts wont gill in. The last few years I fished there was a regulation keeping us 500' off the eastern shore of the canal. That was almost 20 yrs. ago, don't know if it is still in place.
 

Smalma

Active Member
#89
Chris -
The incidental commercial take of sea-runs is generally associated with beach seines which can be pretty deadly on the sea-runs. Historically that was a problem with the Tulalip beach seine fisheries and now with "experimental" beach seine fisheries on Hood Canal non-treaty commercial fishers I can see a potential for some problems.

Curt
 

Kfish

Active Member
#90
While it's good to visit the topic from time to time I do not think closures are warranted for sea runs in our Sound IMO. There are not a whole lot of anglers out there that I can see and public beach access is very limited vs the seemingly endless amount of private beaches.
Besides rubber nets and barbless hooks we all could contribute to this fishery by submitting data to www.coastalcutthroatcoalition.com
Right now they are welcoming parasite (argulids, copepods) info from your fishing encounters. Would be cool if they can chime in here and give a brief state of the Sound report, I know they do beach seine counts as part of their research.
Going to tie up some jungle cock soft plastics now :)
 

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