Heat Trearment Ovens

Bajema

Active Member
#1
I’m working my way through rough planing my strips and I’m hopefully going to be ready to heat treat them soon. Any advice or recommendations for a heat treatment oven. I’ve seen Frank Neunemann’s design recommended a lot, so that’s what I’m leaning towards, but any other ideas would be appreciated.
 
#2
Darrell Hayashida's method was to flame the inside of the half culm first, scrape the chared surface with a wire brush, then split and plane. I did it that way on my first couple of rods and they turned out fine. You sound like you are past that option though. My oven is a lot simpler, double wall pipe with a heat gun on one end. If you like you can swing by and check it out sometime. Not real high tech but it get's the job done well.

Heck if you like you could bring your strips over to my place and we could cook them here.

Just a quick question, are you just rough planning or planning to taper, you really want to heat treat in the rough planning stage.

Mike
 
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#4
As with almost everything in rod making, there are lots of options for heat treating. The simplest way is to flame the inside of half-culms to drive out moisture but avoid scorching the power fibers on the outside. You can also buy or build an electronic oven with a fancy thermostat to automatically keep the temperature constant. In any case, the purpose of heat treating is to remove moisture and alter the cane so that it's stiffer and only recovers slight moisture in the future.

Pardon the pun, but us rod makers often have "heated" arguments about the right temperature, timing, and processes for heat treating.

The one I made many years ago is a simple heat gun oven, consisting of a 3" stove pipe with a folded rat screen inside, wrapped with insulation and enclosed in a 5 or 6" diameter stove pipe. I put a 3" elbow on the end, with a baffled vent. Three thermometers are installed to determine the temperature. I put a piece of sheet metal with a hole on the variable temperature heat gun, prop it up on a piece of wood and run it until the oven temperature is 400F, or pretty close to it, on all three thermometers. I insert the sections, and constantly adjust to keep all three thermometers between 350 and 400F for 7 minutes. Then I flip the strips in the oven and heat treat for another 7 minutes, which compensates for the temperature difference in the oven. After this process, I'll lower the temperature to 200F for an hour, to get all the moisture out. The sections then need to sit in the garage for a few days to regain some moisture.

I attached a couple of poor pictures so you can see what it looks like. Though not perfect, this set up is inexpensive, easy to make, and has served me well for over 15 years.

Hope this helps.

Tom
 

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Bajema

Active Member
#5
Thanks for the input. I like the idea of keeping things simple. Sometimes it's hard to turn off the engineer in me.

@Mike Monsos I’m rough planing, just using my steel forms rather than making separate rough forms.
 

Tim Cottage

Formerly tbc1415
#8
I’m working my way through rough planing my strips and I’m hopefully going to be ready to heat treat them soon. Any advice or recommendations for a heat treatment oven. I’ve seen Frank Neunemann’s design recommended a lot, so that’s what I’m leaning towards, but any other ideas would be appreciated.
I think if the engineer in you likes Frank Neunemann's design then build it. It is a very simple, low cost and apparently effective design. Especially if you are going to use epoxy where you will need to hang your sections so they don't touch anything while the epoxy cures.

TC
 
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