Interesting study about ocean fisheries

Tinker

Active Member
#1
This is a good summary of the information posted down on the Northern California Kayak Anglers forum.

http://www.norcalkayakanglers.com/index.php?topic=82817.0;topicseen

"February 22, 2018

"There may be a lot of fish in the sea. But we didn't know much about where the fish were, or who was fishing them.

"Now, by analyzing satellite data that looked at thousands of high-seas fishing vessels over four years, a study for the first time shines a spotlight on fishing’s scope and pattern around the world.

"Scientists used ships’ own emergency beacons to pinpoint their locations and movements.

"A key finding of the study said fishing affects more than 55% of the ocean’s surface — which is over four times the area covered by agriculture. Some parts of the world with poor satellite coverage were not visible. 'The total area fished is likely higher,' possibly up to 73%, said the report.

"Other findings from the study show that just five countries — China, Spain, Taiwan, Japan and South Korea — account for 85% of fishing on the high seas. And by far, China does the most fishing of any nation on Earth.

"The world's hotspots for fishing include the Northeast Atlantic, Northwest Pacific, and some regions off South America and west Africa.

"Additionally, the researchers noted more than 37 million hours of fishing in 2016 and found fishing vessels traveled more than 285 million miles that year alone, a distance to the moon and back 600 times.

“'Most people will be surprised that until now, we didn't really know where people were fishing in vast swaths of the ocean,' said study co-author Chris Costello, an economist at the University of California Santa Barbara. 'This new real-time data set will be instrumental in designing improved management of the world’s oceans that is good for the fish, ecosystems and fishermen.'

"Global fishing patterns are tied more to politics and culture than to climate change and fish migration: For instance, holidays had the greatest effect on fishing patterns in most of the world. Fishing tends to drop on holidays including Christmas, New Year’s and the Lunar New Year, researchers found.

"State-imposed summertime fishing bans had the biggest impact on the movements of Chinese fleets.

"The data from the research is available online at globalfishingwatch.org. 'By publishing the data and analysis, we aim to increase transparency in the commercial fishing industry and improve opportunities for sustainable management,' said lead author David Kroodsma of Global Fishing Watch.

"Study co-author Boris Worm, a marine biologist at Dalhousie University in Canada, said 'the most mind-blowing thing is just how global an enterprise this is. It’s more like factories that are mass producing product for a global market and less like hunters that are stalking individual prey.'"
 
#2
Interesting info; thanks for sharing. Somewhat unbelievable (but totally believable) that we are just now getting a handle on how much humans fish on an industrial level.

Boris Worm’s name rang a bell. This paper made a bit of a splash when it came out.
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#3
My son-in-law has been working on this project for the last several years and on the article for Science for over a year. He was pretty stoked about having it come out in Science last Friday, so my daughter organized a party Saturday evening at the house. Got to meet a bunch of brainiacs, a very different circle than the bunch of fly fishermen I run around with.
 

Charles Sullivan

ignoring Rob Allen and Generic
#4
My son-in-law has been working on this project for the last several years and on the article for Science for over a year. He was pretty stoked about having it come out in Science last Friday, so my daughter organized a party Saturday evening at the house. Got to meet a bunch of brainiacs, a very different circle than the bunch of fly fishermen I run around with.
wHat does ya meen. fisherman are smrt to.

Go Sox,
cds
 
#6
Link to the actual data compiled?

Looking at AIS transponders (only way they can track any commercial vessel)...is only as reliable as the time of day. Most commercial vessels disable their AIS transponders during the day...as they are only required to have them turned on at night for safety purposes.
 
#7
Link to the actual data compiled?

Looking at AIS transponders (only way they can track any commercial vessel)...is only as reliable as the time of day. Most commercial vessels disable their AIS transponders during the day...as they are only required to have them turned on at night for safety purposes.
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/359/6378/904

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smar...ssels-reveals-industrys-toll-ocean-180968250/

I don’t see that being an issue at the global scale. The vessels don’t move that fast, do they? Plus, I’m guessing they might have been able to verify with imagery. (I haven’t seen the full article past the paywall)
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#8
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/359/6378/904

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smar...ssels-reveals-industrys-toll-ocean-180968250/

I don’t see that being an issue at the global scale. The vessels don’t move that fast, do they? Plus, I’m guessing they might have been able to verify with imagery. (I haven’t seen the full article past the paywall)
the high seas factory ships or BMT's that I joint venture fished with in the eightys could travel at 17 knots all day long
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
#9
the high seas factory ships or BMT's that I joint venture fished with in the eightys could travel at 17 knots all day long
Hi BB,
Even if the ship turned off its transponder for 24 hours, that would only put the ship 400ish miles from the last point in a Pacific Ocean that is almost 10,000 miles across. It would simply require connecting the dots..... The scale is the thing....
Steve
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
#10
Hi BB,
Even if the ship turned off its transponder for 24 hours, that would only put the ship 400ish miles from the last point in a Pacific Ocean that is almost 10,000 miles across. It would simply require connecting the dots..... The scale is the thing....
Steve
Yes the problem is they can be fishing in closed water and then magically reappear in permitted waters later in the day. It’s been a ongoing game for years.
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
#11
Yes the problem is they can be fishing in closed water and then magically reappear in permitted waters later in the day. It’s been a ongoing game for years.
Hi BB,
I agree that the data are too coarse (or subject to manipulation) to address the question of illegal fishing inside a closed area. I have the impression that the purpose of the study is just to describe the global intensity of commercial fishing effort, especially on the high seas. It is often hard to grasp the scale of small cumulative impacts from individual vessels but the graphics clearly document the global scale of industrial fishing. And even this estimate is likely on the low side of fishing intensity, especially in coastal waters. Smaller coastal fishing vessels are not required to have the transponders and would not have been included in the data set.
Steve
 

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