Starting up

#3
Drop in at your local fly shop and see what they have. Spend as much as you can on quality tools and perhaps some lessons. That would be the best starting point I think.


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#4
Check around at your local fly shops - see if one offers informal tying classes (like the Tie One On Tuesdays or Bugs and Brews), and go check it out. Once you have the basic skills down, you can tie pretty much anything. Pick a couple of flies, get the necessary materials, and tie up a few dozen of each (Elk Hair Caddis, Hare's Ear nymph, clousers etc). Expand from there...pretty soon you'll be "saving money by tying your own flies" ;)
 
#6
DJ,

Where do you live? There may be someone in your area that would help you get started and be a mentor.

I live in the south end of Seattle and I would help you if that would work for you.

Dave
 

jasmillo

Active Member
#7
If you fish streamers, start with those. If you fish saltwater, even better.

I am a fairly new tier myself. I have flyfished for roughly 20 years and never really tied anything outside of the basics (elk hair caddis, woolly buggers, etc.). Trout bugs are tough, especially small stuff. What got me into tying is saltwater fishing. You can really get creative on a bigger scale, using funky colors and materials while still learning the basics. For me, tying some bigger stuff was what really what turned me around on tying.

Have fun and be careful! It can quickly devolve into a whole new hobby to obsess over....
 

TJ Fisher

Active Member
#9
Have fun and be careful! It can quickly devolve into a whole new hobby to obsess over....
I can attest to this, I have to get creative with explanations to my wife as to why I need more material and have started carrying most things with me in the truck to tie at work when I'm not busy. :D
 
#11
I would forget about the kit, there are some good not to expensive vises out there, get one of those! Buy the standard TMC ceramic bobbin holder, it's the best cheapest high end bobbin holder, learn to suck the thread through! Buy the small Fiskars scissors & make a bodkin by putting a sewing needle into something! Buy veevus thread, it's strong! If you live near flyshop's & they have half price bargain bins? Then you are lucky, i love the bargain bins!
 

NCL

Active Member
#13
YouTube has numerous videos that help in many aspects of tying. Watch the tier closely because sometimes it is just a matter of watching for techniques which are sometimes not mentioned. Check the classified section and you will sometimes find used vises, materials, and tools. The suggestion of a mentor is a great one.
 

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