BIG Eddy

#1
Just got home from an interesting session. Fished Hammersley outlet on the out going tide, and man was it going! Found where the current rolled into a nice eddy. Set-up so I could cast at a 45 down current and let it slide into the slack, eddyline. Thought I was on a big river, swinging flies to Steelhead. Well as fishy as it seemed I only got 2 thugs and nothing landed. What would you all do? I thought about walking down where there was more of a pool but ran out of time. Saw one rise so I put on the Gurgler. No go. Bristle Worm on the bottom? Think again chump. Squid and Squimp? Haa. No way. Thing is, it was still alot of fun...
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater
#2
There are times when the outside water of a rip is moving faster then fish prefer it.
There might not be anything of interest for them in the softer inside water.
I’ve seen this many times while coho fishing.
Once that outside water begins to slow, the bite can turn on.
Depending on the beach and tide, it can take quite a bit of time over the period of a tide cycle for the water to hit prime movement speed.
SF
 

Clint F

Fly Fishing Youth
#3
like stonefish said I have seen exactly that to be true. I have also seen cases where. you want to be fishing that water right off the point at its fastest part. if there is structure a dip, rock, or anything like that in ther fast water fish will sit there and wait for food to come buy and it will be a hard hit, just like fishing a river. I have only found eddies to produce personally when a giant bait ball gets pushed into it and you cant see bottom through the bait. fish will be all over in the bait and that's when I like a bright fly that stands out from the rest. white clouser tied with red thread has proven itself well in this situation. and also I found it best casting out over the bait and stripping it into the bait. it usually gets hit on the outer edge before getting into the soft water where the bait is.
 
#5
Guys like Roger Stevens always fish at least type 6 sinking lines in the south sound fjords because of the heavy currents. When fishing along side Roger with my standard intermediate I'm almost always outfished at least 5 to 1.

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

Totally agree with this. Im a big fan of the Airflo 40+ type 7 for fishing the south sound especially from a boat
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#6
I launched my old 13' square stern canoe with my electric trolling motor at the Arcadia ramp once early in the morning just before high tide, when it was blowing hard from the south, and I ducked around the corner and soon was out of the wind, shielded by the high bank. I worked the shoreline as I headed West, and only found a couple of fish near logs and downed trees near the shore. I worked my way toward Shelton.
After the tide turned and started moving, I fished off a creek mouth, and had good luck swinging my fly along the edge of the quickening rip. I could see the bottom where I was anchored as tight against the up-current shoreline as I could get, so as to not be fishing in the creek itself, not being certain about the boundaries separating the creek mouth from the inlet. The creek wasn't open for fishing, but I was swinging my fly so that it would end up hanging right along the rip edge. The cutthroat would then come out and grab the fly. Fish on! It was Spring, and it was raining. The creek water was a bit discolored, with only a few feet of visibility, so it was easy to see the "edge" of the inlet's current. I was using one of Bob Triggs' Chum Babies, since some of those creeks have Chum runs. I was using my 6wt clear intermediate line.
On my way back to the launch, I found a couple of cutthroat holding in depressions close to the bottom, and not far from the beach. The current was getting to be too much, though. I recall a huge run out that day. I noticed that a huge eddy had formed behind a point. I checked it out, but the water was very deep there, and the current was difficult to manage, and to me, it actually did not look like a good spot at that time, during max ebb.
 
Last edited:
#7
I launched my old 13' square stern canoe with my electric trolling motor at the Arcadia ramp once early in the morning just before high tide, when it was blowing hard from the south, and I ducked around the corner and soon was out of the wind, shielded by the high bank. I worked the shoreline as I headed West, and only found a couple of fish near logs and downed trees near the shore. I worked my way toward Shelton.
After the tide turned and started moving, I fished off a creek mouth, and had good luck swinging my fly along the edge of the quickening rip. I could see the bottom where I was anchored as tight against the up-current shoreline as I could get, so as to not be fishing in the creek itself, not being certain about the boundaries separating the creek mouth from the inlet. The creek wasn't open for fishing, but I was swinging my fly so that it would end up hanging right along the rip edge. The cutthroat would then come out and grab the fly. Fish on! It was Spring, and it was raining. The creek water was a bit discolored, with only a few feet of visibility, so it was easy to see the "edge" of the inlet's current. I was using one of Bob Triggs' Chum Babies, since some of those creeks have Chum runs. I was using my 6wt clear intermediate line.
On my way back to the launch, I found a couple of cutthroat holding in depressions close to the bottom, and not far from the beach. The current was getting to be too much, though. I recall a huge run out that day. I noticed that a huge eddy had formed behind a point. I checked it out, but the water was very deep there, and the current was difficult to manage, and to me, it actually did not look like a good spot at that time, during max ebb.
 
#8
Thanks for all your insights. I'll be trying my sinking line . My "secret beach" is shallow so Im used to floating line. I need to experiment more, its so easy to get into the lazy rut. Think I want to take the canoe and let the tide wash me out to Arcadia. Oh yea..
 

Latest posts