asking for a lot

#1
so, as I am new to this saltwater flyfishing and doing some scouting via Google Earth,
My question is......... what am I looking for? flats and steep dropoff? beach and steep dropoff?

many thanks
Fence
 
#7
Google Earth is an okay place to start but it has many limitations mostly the fact that a bunch of that good water is going to be on private property man.... the very best advise (as has been stated many times) is choose a particulate region and then go spend a full day or two scouting the area and finding access points and looking at tide changes and all that man.... then just go fishing.... the only way to know for sure is a put a fly in the water and see what happens man....
 
#8
Points are great, but remember that what appears to be a beach on a map may be made up of many small points! Hence, different beaches fish well on different tides. My biggest sea-run (26”) was hooked in about 10” of water (early morning!) behind a small point. Most folks don’t notice it. I thought I was casting to two small fish but turned out to be tip of tail and tip of dorsal fin. Always step carefully when wading! Bigger points also fish well as previously noted! But don’t ignore the “small” stuff.
 
#9
Google Earth is an okay place to start but it has many limitations mostly the fact that a bunch of that good water is going to be on private property man.... the very best advise (as has been stated many times) is choose a particulate region and then go spend a full day or two scouting the area and finding access points and looking at tide changes and all that man.... then just go fishing.... the only way to know for sure is a put a fly in the water and see what happens man....
another question, in Georgia "private land" only extended to the high water line, is that the same case in Washington? for example start at a boat ramp on a falling tide and follow the waterline then head back before the tide comes in?
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater
#10
Some tidelands are owned, so you'd be trespassing in some cases.
Most folks are pretty cool, but you'll run into folks that don't want you on their property.
If that happens, apologize and just move on.
Don't be afraid to chat up some homeowners and ask for permission to fish on their property.
Tell them you'll be quiet and pick up any litter you see. Offer them a salmon or a good bottle of booze or wine as a token of appreciation for access.
The worst they can say is no.

As far as points go, look for rips and micro rips off of them.
The main thing with beach fishing is to find moving water and have confidence in what you are doing.
SF
 
#11
Some tidelands are owned, so you'd be trespassing in some cases.
Most folks are pretty cool, but you'll run into folks that don't want you on their property.
If that happens, apologize and just move on.
Don't be afraid to chat up some homeowners and ask for permission to fish on their property.
Tell them you'll be quiet and pick up any litter you see. Offer them a salmon or a good bottle of booze or wine as a token of appreciation for access.
The worst they can say is no.

As far as points go, look for rips and micro rips off of them.
The main thing with beach fishing is to find moving water and have confidence in what you are doing.
SF
Thanks SF
 

rotato

Active Member
#12
moving water over cobble with few larger stones can be juicy, but you will find fish in all sorts of environs. Cutthroat will rarely hang over sand or mud but coho don't seem to care.
Have fun exploring
 

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