NFR Help me find a new home for my dog.

#1
Her name is Gracie. She's a 5 year old Mini Aussie. Great with people/kids. Not good with another alpha.

The wife and I feel like complete failures as dog owners. We have three dogs. Jackie, she's a 11 year old Shelitie. Molly, 10 year old Minni Aussie and Gracie. My avatar left to right; Molly, Jackie, Gracie.

When we brought Gracie home, she and Molly bonded great. Two peas in a pod. The problems started when Gracie decided she was going to be the alpha. For whatever reason, Molly decided to let her even thou Molly is much bigger dog. 15 pounds, 4 inches with much bigger teeth.

Gracie has been a bad alpha. Overbearing and aggressive. Molly put up with it for years. Last year things started to change. Molly started to take issue with it. Fights were rair but very violent. Aussies being almost indestructible almost no injuries were happening. I'd brake them up and they would make up right away. Back to peas in a pod.

This month things changed for the worse. Molly has decided to regain alpha. Fights have gotten far worse. Last week they went at it and after I separated then both dogs continued to try to get back into it for some time. Then Monday night the final straw. Gracie approached Molly from behind. I stepped in and pushed her away with my foot. Molly heard it and went on the attack. The two of them were locked onto each other and I had them pinned to the ground. It took every thing I had to get them apart. Gracie ended up with a gash in her leg to the bone. She spent the night in the E.R. and has been in the kennel with a cone sence then.

We know they must be separated. But it's (almost) like asking a parent to choose a kid. Gracie is younger so she can have a better chance of getting adopted.

We really don't want to just give her to some shelter or rescue place. They have a rule about not letting you know where the dog ended up. We can't abide by this.

When we brought Gracie home, we took on the moral obligation to take care of her for the rest of her life. We can't just let that go because it's not working out.

So here's what we are looking for:
1. No other dogs or only small passive ones. She doesn't ever bother Jackie. Plays with her very gently.

2. Fenced yard. Gracie tends to get selective hearing and can wonder in the open.

3. Cats are a no go. She has been trained to keep them from the yard.

4. No taking her to the dog park and letting her go. She will challenge all the other dogs. We stopped taking them there becouse of her behavior.

5. Kids are a plus. She's really good with them and very submissive. note. She will bare her teeth when greeting. This is a sign of submission.

6. Walks great on a leash. But some backyard fetch will do. Likes to lick. Not a bad chewer. Will recycle poo.

7. No chewie things, rawhide,greenies or alike. She will just try to swallow them whole. No table scraps from plates.We do add some leftovers to their kibbles. (cleaned meat, rice, vegetables) she gets 1/2 cup of kibbles, twice a day.


I'll try to post some pics this afternoon. Any questions, send me a message.
 

Dupher

If you can read this, you are fishing too close
#2
sorry you have to deal with this, I hope you are able to find a some one to take her in
 
#3
So sorry to hear this, we had to do the same thing with a Bull Terrier I rescued. She was well trained and sweet, loved kids and people but started attacking my older pit when food was around. Then it progressed to unprovoked random attacks; had no choice but to surrender her to the rescue I had gotten her from. Broke my heart. She’d probably be a great ranch dog.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#4
That's a tough one, Jeff. Even if I didn't have Hank (also with a strong dislike for cats, which I view as a plus), the little Boston Bull yappers next door would drive her nuts, although over time Hank has been trained to ignore them. Good luck. Sorry I can't help.
 
#6
Her name is Gracie. She's a 5 year old Mini Aussie. Great with people/kids. Not good with another alpha.

The wife and I feel like complete failures as dog owners. We have three dogs. Jackie, she's a 11 year old Shelitie. Molly, 10 year old Minni Aussie and Gracie. My avatar left to right; Molly, Jackie, Gracie.

When we brought Gracie home, she and Molly bonded great. Two peas in a pod. The problems started when Gracie decided she was going to be the alpha. For whatever reason, Molly decided to let her even thou Molly is much bigger dog. 15 pounds, 4 inches with much bigger teeth.

Gracie has been a bad alpha. Overbearing and aggressive. Molly put up with it for years. Last year things started to change. Molly started to take issue with it. Fights were rair but very violent. Aussies being almost indestructible almost no injuries were happening. I'd brake them up and they would make up right away. Back to peas in a pod.

This month things changed for the worse. Molly has decided to regain alpha. Fights have gotten far worse. Last week they went at it and after I separated then both dogs continued to try to get back into it for some time. Then Monday night the final straw. Gracie approached Molly from behind. I stepped in and pushed her away with my foot. Molly heard it and went on the attack. The two of them were locked onto each other and I had them pinned to the ground. It took every thing I had to get them apart. Gracie ended up with a gash in her leg to the bone. She spent the night in the E.R. and has been in the kennel with a cone sence then.

We know they must be separated. But it's (almost) like asking a parent to choose a kid. Gracie is younger so she can have a better chance of getting adopted.

We really don't want to just give her to some shelter or rescue place. They have a rule about not letting you know where the dog ended up. We can't abide by this.

When we brought Gracie home, we took on the moral obligation to take care of her for the rest of her life. We can't just let that go because it's not working out.

So here's what we are looking for:
1. No other dogs or only small passive ones. She doesn't ever bother Jackie. Plays with her very gently.

2. Fenced yard. Gracie tends to get selective hearing and can wonder in the open.

3. Cats are a no go. She has been trained to keep them from the yard.

4. No taking her to the dog park and letting her go. She will challenge all the other dogs. We stopped taking them there becouse of her behavior.

5. Kids are a plus. She's really good with them and very submissive. note. She will bare her teeth when greeting. This is a sign of submission.

6. Walks great on a leash. But some backyard fetch will do. Likes to lick. Not a bad chewer. Will recycle poo.

7. No chewie things, rawhide,greenies or alike. She will just try to swallow them whole. No table scraps from plates.We do add some leftovers to their kibbles. (cleaned meat, rice, vegetables) she gets 1/2 cup of kibbles, twice a day.


I'll try to post some pics this afternoon. Any questions, send me a message.
Hey Jeff, thats a tough one having to make that decision. She sounds like a great dog despite a few issues. My wife and I have been involved in dog rescue for many years most of that evolved around the newfoundland breed. I can imagine as popular as aussies are there is a rescue program and people willing to help find her the right home. If nothing else it might be an option. Sounds like she would be perfect for a single dog family.
 
#7
Sorry to hear about your problem. Giving up a dog is really hard. I have been a vet for 37 years and this is such a common problem. Maybe a little advice might help. If not, ignore it and I wish you the best. Alpha dogs are all about control. They get nervous when not in control and use anger/aggression to restore control. Sort of like a bully in school. When you have two dogs that want to be in control in the same pack, aggression and fighting is usually the result. Alpha dogs, like some aggressive people, are really good at what they do, lead the pack, but when they are "out of balance" then their worst traits come forward, aggression. I suspect that Molly always had a bit more confidence than Gracie, but it appears that something has shaken that and she now feels the need to step up and regain her dominance. When I deal with this situation as a vet, I like to use a Chinese medicine perspective as it gives me the best options of getting things under control. In Chinese medicine each individual falls into one of five categories (five element system). Alpha dogs are usually wood element dogs. Imagine General Patton. He was a wood individual. He was a great leader but his temper got him in trouble all the time. Wood element individuals dominant organ is the liver and the emotion associated with the liver is anger (makes sense), so when we have an individual who is displaying too much anger (you said that Gracie is overbearing and aggressive) then her liver is out of balance. Instead of dealing with it as a behavior problem, we deal with it as a liver problem. If we get the liver back in balance, often the aggressive tendencies diminish and they are more confident in themselves. This makes the entire pack more harmonious. Even if you find her another home, the aggressiveness will likely continue and could be displayed in other ways. I had a client give his dog away for the same reason as yours, gave it to a couple without a dog and the dog ended up biting the wife. Not a good outcome. There is a Chinese herbal formula called Xiao Yao Wan that is the gold standard for aggressive liver dogs. I have seen it help many dogs over the years, often some that were headed for euthanasia. It will take several weeks to kick in, but you might want to consider it. You can find it on Amazon.com. The company I like is Plumb Flower tea pills and the dose for dogs is 1 pill per 10 pounds of body weight 2-3 times a day. Take care and good luck.
 
#9
No dog should be alpha imho, u should
Believe me, I am the enforcer of the rules. I've broken up at least a dozen dog fights between these two and never been bitten.

There is a difference between us and them. They still have a hierarchy amongst themselves.

I wish the bigger, older Molly would have just put Gracie in her place right off the bat and settled the matter. We tried to encourage this by treating her as alpha in front of the puppy. It just didn't work.

I guess if she would have had pups of her own, she may have came to the point where she instinctively started to scold the puppies aggressive tendencies early on. But she didn't and now it's biting her ass.

Update on Gracie. We had found her a possible home but had to postpone for two weeks. Follow-up with the Vet. lead to another surgery. Her wound was pulling open. Lots more stitches and another big bill.

We've rigged up a bigger cage in the living room so she can move around without dragging her cone across the bars like a prisoner at Alcatraz.

Molly and her are still waiting for a chance to settle things. Growling going on both ways. Just hoping to get Gracie out of here without making a mistake and letting the two of them come in contact.
 

Krusty

Active Member
#10
Believe me, I am the enforcer of the rules. I've broken up at least a dozen dog fights between these two and never been bitten.

There is a difference between us and them. They still have a hierarchy amongst themselves.

I wish the bigger, older Molly would have just put Gracie in her place right off the bat and settled the matter. We tried to encourage this by treating her as alpha in front of the puppy. It just didn't work.

I guess if she would have had pups of her own, she may have came to the point where she instinctively started to scold the puppies aggressive tendencies early on. But she didn't and now it's biting her ass.

Update on Gracie. We had found her a possible home but had to postpone for two weeks. Follow-up with the Vet. lead to another surgery. Her wound was pulling open. Lots more stitches and another big bill.

We've rigged up a bigger cage in the living room so she can move around without dragging her cone across the bars like a prisoner at Alcatraz.

Molly and her are still waiting for a chance to settle things. Growling going on both ways. Just hoping to get Gracie out of here without making a mistake and letting the two of them come in contact.
Had two female Norwich terriers who just couldn't get along. Tried everything. Amateurs recommended we just let them settle it out. That led to bloodbaths and vet bills.

Finally, in desperation we found one of the females another home. Solved the problem just as you're trying to do. The very best of wishes.
 

mbowers

Active Member
#11
Best of luck, I feel for your situation. My two are really well balanced but my girl is very dominant whenever there's another dog around the pair. I like to think I could, but no idea if I could actually maintain the peace in the house if a third dog were added.

Sent from my Moto Z2 Play using Tapatalk
 

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