Chironomid Tips Please

Troutlife

Active Member
#1
I have been reading through a lot of the Stillwater threads and have noticed chironomids seem to be very popular. I will do some research of my own and watch a few videos but was wondering if the WFF had any helpful tips. I fish Stillwater a lot (given how much I get to fish, which isn't very often) and usually troll or strip a wooly bugger or similar fly. Also, chironomids look easy to tie and I was wondering if someone would be gracious enough to share a step by step. Thanks!
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#2
You are about to open up the man hole cover and discover that there is a whole other world down there. This site will yield an insane amount of information.

Start with slip indicators, I use these: http://www.floatsunlimited.com/p100rw-25.html Dual color helps you see micro changes better as does the pear shape.

Next, invest in some good fluorocarbon tippet material.

Learn to tie a non-slip loop knot.

Invest in a cheap pair of hemostats that you can clip to your fly so you can check for the bottom depth exactly.

Tie your patterns with tungsten beads so they hang better in the water.

Tie your pattern either with UV resin or with a clear scud back wrapped over it to make them last longer.

You will want to tie a chromie and you will want to tie a pattern with black body and red ribbing. Those two patterns will be the best start.
http://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/forum/threads/yet-another-chironomid.117172/
http://www.washingtonflyfishing.com/forum/threads/modified-bomber-gunslinger-chironomid.116276/

Find an open seat with someone who knows the game.

As you continue the process, please feel free to ask more specific questions.
 

chromie

Active Member
#8
My vote is for throat pumps and fish finders.

Identify depth, what are fish keying in on, chironomid size and then learn the lake hatch timing.

Catch a couple kick trolling. Pump the THROAT, not stomach, match the size of average chironomid (most likely a chromie or blood worm larvae) and look at your fish finder for the depth fish are hanging out at. Set your indicator. Or you can use the hemostst trick and work your way up. I prefer a fish finder.

Learn to time the hatch. There are morning-mid morning periods that tend to fish better.

Rule out daphnia. If stomach full of daphnia, fish leeches. Most fisherman get hung up here. If fish are keyed in on daphnia, fishing a chironomid feels futile.

That’s a basic blueprint/shortcut to fishing chironomids.
 
#10
@ Irafly, thanks for the indicator tip, I don’t do much indicator fishing where I need a slip indicator but will need some for BC this year; I don’t like the Frog Hair brand, do the ones you reference come with what’s needed for slip setup or is that a separate item?
Found a great price on fluorocarbon tippet, Fenwick; $4.95 for 50 yds.
https://www.backcountry.com/fenwick...6RmVud2ljayB0aXBwZXQ6MToyOkZlbndpY2sgdGlwcGV0
In my experience, not all fluoro is created equal. Over the years I have stockpiled the good stuff when I find a good sale. I trust Scientific Anglers, Airflo Sightfree, Rio Fluoro Flex, and Seaguar 100% fluoro tippet material. One brand to avoid is Berkley!

And yes, those slip indicators come with the peg to set depth.
 
Last edited:

b_illymac

Member Active
#11
In my experience, not all fluoro is created equal. Over the years I have stockpiled the good stuff when I find a good sale. I trust Scientific Anglers, Airflo Sightfree, Rio Fluoro Flex, and Seaguar 100% fluoro tippet material. One brand to avoid is Berkley!

And yes, those slip indicators come with the peg to set depth.
I agree!
A nice flyline and good tippet might be the most important items we bring to the water. Dont skimp on these items.
 

Latest posts