The white rock trick!

#1
Remember reading about it in a salmon magazine years ago, can't remember if the idea came from Norway or Scotland? But in a pool in a spot where you know that a salmon might usually be sitting, put a white rock on the bottom! When you get to that pool, if you can't see the white rock? There just might be a big fish there! Thought about doing it at my local river, but the water is normally the colour of coffee, colour of chocolate milk when blown out & the clearest it gets is the colour of tea, but at that time the water is so low it's not worth fishing! Just thought I'd pass the idea on!
 

SilverFly

Active Member
#4
Remember reading about it in a salmon magazine years ago, can't remember if the idea came from Norway or Scotland? But in a pool in a spot where you know that a salmon might usually be sitting, put a white rock on the bottom! When you get to that pool, if you can't see the white rock? There just might be a big fish there! Thought about doing it at my local river, but the water is normally the colour of coffee, colour of chocolate milk when blown out & the clearest it gets is the colour of tea, but at that time the water is so low it's not worth fishing! Just thought I'd pass the idea on!
Hi Adam,

Yes but never really thought about it as a technique (or trick). In my youth I did a lot of summer steelhead fishing on smaller, high-gradient streams. Lots of hiking, wading, bush-whacking, clambering over large boulders, falling in, stitches afterward, etc... Chasing steelhead in these types of canyon streams is extremely visual, and more like fish hunting. Mostly a cat-and-mouse game of spotting, sneaking-up, and presenting delicate, laser-accurate, non-spooking casts (not easy with shaky hands). So for the most part, it wasn't so much about seeing the fish, as stealth and presentation.

However, some blind, or mostly-blind casting was involved, and occasionally this "trick" was useful. Spots like shadowy pockets, plunge pools and the few runs or slots that had a significant combination of depth and current to provide cover. In these places light colored rocks can be useful to reveal fish hovering over them. Submerged wood be useful in this way as well. Beaver are common on many these streams and their water-logged sapling leftovers can show up like glow-sticks laying on the river bottom. Really bright fish also reflect the bottom, so an undulating line of matching color to the side of such a contrasting bottom feature can reveal a fish (not exactly a common thing to see). Or, if you know the spot well enough that no light rock equals a pod of fish over it.

Thanks, for the reminder about those days. I'll blame you if I break a leg sometime in late June or early July. ;)
 
#5
No GPS for me. I'm going with the white rocks. I fish a number of coastal rivers of the spate variety...summer flows are low enough to be called frog water. I could easily place the rocks in the runs that are good holding water later in the season. Right now I have several buckets of washed stream rocks drying off their coats of non-toxic waterproof white paint, each with a wee shamrock stenciled on by my daughter. She is very proud of our Hibernian heritage.
 
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#8
Well excuse ME. We Hibernians live in a granite landscape...our supply of white limestone is and has always been zero. Sporting? Have you never heard of the method used by several famous US steelheaders to stir up disinterested winter fish? Called "stoning the pool"? I learned that from Jim Teeny. Immortalized on one of his videos. I am at least as sporting as Jim Teeny. Very sporting indeed.
 
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#10
You are including the enhancement of spawning beds, addition of spawning gravel, removal of impeding dams, and saving near-extinct populations with hatchery programs in your anythings, I presume?
 
#12
I have been a member for just a few years. If you are referring to an historical post, I haven't seen it. BTW, you can edit a post if you have an error. I couldn't believe the pool-stoning segment on the Jim Teeny video when I watched it decades ago. Do you chaps across the border actually do stuff like that? Up here in Soviet Canuckistan a pool-stoning offender would soon follow the stones into the pool. And to all of the anglers outraged at my support of the white rocks, can you not realize when someone is pulling your leg? My daughter and I had a good chuckle. Wee shamrocks. Indeed.
 

Dizane

Coast to Coast
#13
A particular run on a particular river I fish for summers used to have a white colored rock on the bottom right in the bucket where fish would usually hold. It was very easy to spot fish in that bucket while the rock was visible and I caught several there after spotting them. It lasted for a few years until the rock disappeared, presumably covered by gravel from winter floods. I still catch fish in the run, but the holding spot has changed. I never thought of putting my own rocks down and the gradient of the river is such that any rocks would likely be blown downstream after the first fall rain.
 

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