Jack Salmon

wanative

Active Member
#2
A jack is any salmon under the minimum legal length allowing retention of the fish as far as WDFW is concerned.
Jack salmon are considered to be salmon that return to the river after only a year or 2 in saltwater. Usually earlier than the rest of their year class reach maturity.
 
#4
I believe there is no length requirement for hatchery Coho. Area 13 allows two hatchery Coho regardless of length. I'll just report them as Coho on the card. Just wondering if immature salmon are Jacks..
 

Bruce Baker

Active Member
#5
I believe there is no length requirement for hatchery Coho. Area 13 allows two hatchery Coho regardless of length. I'll just report them as Coho on the card. Just wondering if immature salmon are Jacks..
No, they are not immature. They are precocious males that spend one winter or less than the youngest female that has returned to spawn.

For all freshwater areas, Willipa Bay, and Grays Harbor, a coho that is less that 20 inches is considered a jack.

You are reporting things correctly for MA 13.
 

Bagman

Active Member
#7
What about the Jill's? Yes their are Jill's out there as well. While the Jacks don't have a lot of luck with the big females, the Jill's don't have the same problem with the big bucks.
 
#10
Good thread--I'm interested because I used to eat a lot of them. (the males that enter fresh water a year early). Back then, someone told me that they don't spawn and they never will--ie, they are an accident. But then I read a scientific report that says basically what this thread says above... that jacks are actually successful spawners that grab a bit of the action when adult fish are spawning. This success is what keeps them so abundant--they pass on their genes. Since I fish a hatchery run, I guess I could still eat as many as I wanted without affecting the population. I assume they expire after spawning, as do all Pacific salmon.