Trip Report Finally, the nymph rig proves itself to me.

Lymitliss

Active Member
#1
My nymph rig, or I guess my nymph/chironomid rig was finally successful this afternoon! I have seen people catch nonstop with similar tactics, and heard it is the way to go for lake fishing, but was close to giving up after striking out on several attempts. Today I decided to give it one last shot and I guess I finally got the depth right! Hit my limit today using a small beige colored nymph below a red snow cone chironomid, suspended about 11 feet below the strike indicator.

I landed 5 trout, hooked a couple more that got away and got a hundred other nibbles throughout the day. I am now a believer.

 

Lymitliss

Active Member
#2
Slayed again on Friday. Overall the day seemed much slower, less bites throughout the day but somehow I ended up catching and releasing more fish when it was all said and done.

This guy was the last fish of the day. Not a huge fish, but he was strong. First trout to actually make a few runs and pull line out. Took me a couple minutes to revive him.




They are absolutely loving the red snow cone. Anyone else use this pattern often? Are there any other favorites I should be trying?
 
#4
Or . . .How I Learned to Love my Bobber:)

Isn’t it fun when it starts coming together? Now that you’ve had a little taste of success, the new challenge will be figuring out how to adjust when it stops working.

The bug that works is the flavor of the day. And every day is a little different. You may tap into a pattern of weather, fish behavior, and food availability that lasts for while . . .but eventually it’s gonna shift and you’ll have to make the adjustment or miss out.

A few questions – how did you end up fishing at 11’ down? Where was your bug in relation to the bottom? 6” up? 18” up? Mid column? Were you fishing on or near some type of visible structure like a weed bed or drop off? Were there actively emerging chironomids on the surface? Birds, like Swallows eating bugs in the vicinity? What time of day did you find success? Water temp? Wind conditions? These are some factors you’ll want to pay attention to so you can start creating a mental narrative to connect the dots.

As for favorite patterns, you’ve experienced success with chironomids. Red, black, and various metallic hues (silver, gunmetal) are my standbys. Micro leeches can work better at times. Blood worms, damsel nymphs, callibaetis nymphs, balanced leeches/buggers, baitfish, the list goes on as to what may be the best choice . . . just depends.
 
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Lymitliss

Active Member
#5
What weight is the other Accel? 6? What line you throwing on it?
The Accel pictured here is a 4wt with 4wt Rio Gold line. I recently got another one in 6wt, but haven't used it yet. I'll most likely switch over to it this week so I can cast an indicator setup a bit better.
 

Lymitliss

Active Member
#6
Or . . .How I Leaned to Love my Bobber:)

Isn’t it fun when it starts coming together? Now that you’ve had a little taste of success, the new challenge will be figuring out how to adjust when it stops working.

The bug that works is the flavor of the day. And every day is a little different. You may tap into a pattern of weather, fish behavior, and food availability that lasts for while . . .but eventually it’s gonna shift and you’ll have to make the adjustment or miss out.

A few questions – how did you end up fishing at 11’ down? Where was your bug in relation to the bottom? 6” up? 18” up? Mid column? Were you fishing on or near some type of visible structure like a weed bed or drop off? Were there actively emerging chironomids on the surface? Birds, like Swallows eating bugs in the vicinity? What time of day did you find success? Water temp? Wind conditions? These are some factors you’ll want to pay attention to so you can start creating a mental narrative to connect the dots.

As for favorite patterns, you’ve experienced success with chironomids. Red, black, and various metallic hues (silver, gunmetal) are my standbys. Micro leeches can work better at times. Blood worms, damsel nymphs, callibaetis nymphs, balanced leeches/buggers, baitfish, the list goes on as to what may be the best choice . . . just depends.
Honestly, I just winged it and picked a length to try. My leader is a 9' tapered, so I threw on a few feet of fluoro tippet to a fly, then another 18" and another fly. I understand that ideally the fly should float about a foot off the bottom, but since I'm new and figuring it all out, I just started there and adjusted the bobber slightly throughout the day. Sometimes I raised the bobber 6", sometimes I lowered it 6.

What I did was figure out which way the current was moving, then I moved to the furthest point and let it move me slowly from one end of the lake to the other. That way I could fish the entire lake, and regardless of where I set the indicator, at some point it was bound to be at the right depth.

I plan to try some larger flies in a stripping motion, but I'll save that for my 6wt so I can use slightly bigger stuff.
 

Triggw

Active Member
#9
... My leader is a 9' tapered, so I threw on a few feet of fluoro tippet to a fly, then another 18" and another fly. I understand that ideally the fly should float about a foot off the bottom, but since I'm new and figuring it all out, I just started there and adjusted the bobber slightly throughout the day. Sometimes I raised the bobber 6", sometimes I lowered it 6.
Start by knowing the depth. If you don't have a fish finder, attach a weight to the bottom fly and lower it until it hits bottom. Then raise the line 1 or 1 1/2 feet and set the bobber there. (And remove the weight.) Less guessing, more fishing. A fish finder is actually much better, because you can see where the weed line is. You want to be a foot or so above the weed line.
 

Lymitliss

Active Member
#10
Start by knowing the depth. If you don't have a fish finder, attach a weight to the bottom fly and lower it until it hits bottom. Then raise the line 1 or 1 1/2 feet and set the bobber there. (And remove the weight.) Less guessing, more fishing. A fish finder is actually much better, because you can see where the weed line is. You want to be a foot or so above the weed line.
I have checked depth using my anchor before, unfortunately this lake varies greatly and some spots are way too deep to fish at the bottom.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#11
When I fished nymphs in the Beaverhead, I used two. A San Juan Worm on the top and a Black zebra nymph on the bottom. I would use this set up to catch trout. If I used a red zebra nymph on the bottom I would catch Whitefish. I did this several times and that's the way it worked out. I quit with the red zebra nymph.
 

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